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  1. Today
  2. Dylan Code

    How Much Weight On The Seat?

    I can't tell if you are serious or joking with this post. Tensing your gut to steer the motorcycle? Turning your head to steer it? Pull the inside bar outwards? Regarding you comment about the No BS bike, the further you are from the center of mass of an object, the more leverage one has on it. The No BS bars are quite high, therefore have more leverage and still can't get the bike steered with any efficiency.
  3. Johnno down under

    Seems you do not need wide radials

    And it would wear like a bugger in Highway use due to the lack of serious corners unless the centre tread was a very hard compound.
  4. Johnno down under

    Wished-for bike?

    I’d like modernised 1987suzuki gsx 400x. Impulse. The unfaired version with the larger tank. Modern suspension and tyres. This has a low seat a shortish wheel base at 1346mm on 17” hoops. And when well tuned provides 55-57 hp and a top speed of 240kph. Even the stock cheap-as 1980s suspension is adequate, and I often wonder what it would be like to have a modern adjustable suspension system. The seat is unique, wide at rear and narrow at the tank. Hanging off is easy as, but one can still ride long distances comfortably. The engine is unburstable, full time oil pump, seriously over cooled ( air, water, oil jacket) , and the brakes are phenomenal for a bike this size. Indeed, if any thing, it’s over braked. To get the brakes truly hot requires serious abuse. In the late 1980s these were the formula three bike of choice, not only because the were cheap but because with few refinements they could compete n equal terms with two strokes the RD350, and th more race orientated TZR250, and the NSRs. Not bad for a sports commuter favoured by courier riders. the engine is unburstable, with a full time oil pump ( doesn’t disengage with the clutch) and very well cooled. I had one that did over 580 kilometres without much more than plug and oil changes, -before it was stolen ( immediately after my fifth replacement of chain and sprockets, and new rubber). Adding modern odern suspension would make the bike more amenable to my present weight, the original suspension is unfortunately tuned for a 65kg rider. The original suspension also was quite entertaining during hard braking into corners as the entire front end wriggled furiously, and jumped side to side all the way to the apex, every single corner. Stiffer, more compliant suspension would improve predictability enourmously. Shortening the wheelbase by straightening up the fork angle to about 1297mm makes this bike turn more like a GP bike. The steel frame makes this mod easy with nothing more than a car jack. Building the frame in a modern lightwieght rigid and straight ( the original factory frame was built with the wheels not in line by 30mm) would be a good solution. Replacing the stock rear suspension rose joint with a nylon brush stiffens the rear up to an amazing degree and makes steering from the rear reliable. in the meantime I’ll continue riding my 30 year old hack, that I obtained after 17 abusive previous owners. One day, it will have a very expensive birthday, if I can find a good engineer.
  5. Johnno down under

    Wide Vision

    One could describe this vision as ping pong vision. In ping pong one focuses attention on the opponent and use wide vision/peripheral vision to track and return the ball. One never focuses on the ball at all. Another description that is relevant in hard focus( long sight) and soft vision ( in the near/ wide zone). Rather than think of this as being zoned out, it is more useful to think of it as an active meditation. Note it is quicker to shorten ones gaze than to lengthen it. When focusing on near objects the distant objects are more out of focus, than near objects when looking afar due to the optics of the eye. note also the brain handles movement in peripheral vision much better than at the focus of ones gaze, that is why ping pong players attend to the opponent rather than the ball. When riding using peripheral vison to watch the near field actually means the brain processes all the seeming fast moving near objects much more swiftly, even if they are all out of focus.
  6. Johnno down under

    Can Weight Shift Theory be debunked?

    I have had precisely one set of road tyres ( 1980s super sport radials) that seriously exaggerated the pro steering component. This meant the bike sat far more vertical through hard turns. They also taught me the value of being loose on the bars. Countersteer hard at turn in then let the bikes front end do its thing.then gas on at the right point. Easy as.
  7. Johnno down under

    How Much Weight On The Seat?

    I’ve always wondered what the effect of the no BSbike would be if the fixed bars were set at or lower down, and perhaps slightly forward of the regular bars. This set up would be more akin to a normal riding position, and leverage. In my hard out riding I pull the inside bar outwards, more than push a countersteer. It is a countersteer, but is focused more on setting my weight and leverage consistently post initiating countersteer effort. And yes I am loose on the bars. On my old 1980s suspensioned sports commuter bike, allowing the front to wriggle and jump is crucial to maintaining control. On a gsxr900rf I barely move or countersteer at all, all I need do is turn my head to follow the vanishing point of a corner, and tense my gut left or right. The pace I achieve doing just this seems phenomenal and is substantially greater than can be achieved on my gsx400x. The riding position is the biggest difference. The 900cc ought to initiate corners slower due to a significantly longer wheelbase, and higher mass, but the more upright seating position of the 150kg 400cc slows it down significantly. But then again I’m super confident on the 400 at its limits and beyond because I’ve got over a million Km on it, and it has immense breaking ability. despite all this, Keith Codes point about accuracy via countersteering is well made and very useful. If a person doesn’t understand countersteering they will end up hurt.
  8. Johnno down under

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    A skill I learned as a young rider, is best explained by an anthropology text discussing the relationship between research and imagination. It spoke of “soft vision, hard focus”. Ones hard focus is on the road well ahead, this is maintained while also allowing oneself soft vision out in the periphery of ones vision. on your bike this means that one remains actively aware of what’s going on outside the focus of ones attention. Thus although my focus is often ( on rural roads) two corners ahead watching for oncoming vehicles, landslides and road debris. In my soft vision is placing me on the road, alert to surface and random animals walking out in my immediate viscinity. In terms of cornering it is my soft vision that marks my arrival at the turn in point already. I can tell by three or four inches whether I hit my mark. When navigating blind corners. The hard focus varies between 2000-300 metres ahead to the next corners, right down to 30 metres on those nasty closing radius blind corners. On those corners the eye follows the vanishing point alert to the need to radically change my chosen line. But.soft focus deals with all the little details of road placement. It is all very active and meditative, especially when I’m fully in the groove. Dodging unexpected sheep, and oncoming trucks that cut corners is handled almost entirely by the soft vision aspect. The hard focus in those instances looks to those avenues of escape that I spotted previously: hunting and tracking the gap. Hard focus turns my head. Soft vision looks everywhere else. another comparison is player of ping pong, or boxers neither focuses on the ball, or the fist, they look hard at the opposing player, and rely on soft vision to hit the ball or block the fist. hope this helps those who get lost vision wise.
  9. tt675

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    Email sent.😀
  10. Yesterday
  11. TonySilva

    Steering Video No Bs Bike

    Jim Papadopoulos is a great researcher. I like the name of the email list he founded and moderated - "Hardcore Bicycle Science". Great inspiring story.
  12. Last week
  13. Lnewqban

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Excellent post, Hotfoot. 😀 It very well explains the "throttle should be open as soon as possible" line in the book. Prior reaching maximum lean or slidding state, the bike is always following the trajectory that the rider commands it to follow via steering and throttle. Good visual skills help me with the spatial awareness regarding where the bike is located at any time in a succession of turns and helps me decide about the proper moments to brake, accelerate and turn in.
  14. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Okay. I’ll go out to specifically observe this. Thank you.
  15. Hotfoot

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Yes, it could be that you are at your desired lean angle (steering action complete) but not yet pointed in the direction you want the bike to go. Sometimes there is a pause as you wait for the bike to come around onto the desired line. Turn 2 at Laguna is a GREAT example of a turn where it is VERY easy to get on the gas a little too early in the second part of the turn and miss the apex - which is punished immediately upon the exit because it is tight and forces the rider to make a correction to avoid going off track. It is also really easy to come on the throttle a little bit too early when chasing a faster rider, trying to catch up, or keep up.
  16. Earlier
  17. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Thank you. I think Hotfoot was getting at that same idea. I'll have a go at it. Question: Are we saying that steering can be complete but yet the bike is not pointed in the desired direction?...there's a time delay between relaxing the steering input and bike on line???
  18. trueblue550

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    My coach at Laguna Seca noticed I was getting on the throttle too early in the second part of turn 2. I told him the same thing, I begin a smooth, even, continuous roll on after steering is complete. He advised me that because a throttle roll-on tends to make a bike hold its line, I should begin roll-on when steering is complete and the bike is pointed where I want it to go. The little bit of extra time off the throttle did help me get a better line and drive out of the corner.
  19. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    That was a typo on my part. I meant to say: I leave some lean angle margin. Regarding my original issue: I think the solution could be: The Two Step Drill
  20. Hotfoot

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    What do you mean, when you say you leave some turning margin?
  21. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    I turn the gas on as soon as I'm done with the steering input. I do leave some turning margin. In this particular instance it was a new bike, new track and different tires so my confidence was low on knowing where where the roll limit was. I was conscious that I probably had lean angle reserve.
  22. Hotfoot

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Speaking of timing... something else to take a look at is exactly WHEN you crack the throttle on. If a rider is running a little bit wide a little before the apex (not able to make it to the desired apex) what could that tell you about the rider's throttle timing? Next time you ride pay attention to when the throttle comes on - is the bike on its line (fully leaned and pointed in the direction you want it to go) before you start to roll on the gas?
  23. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Yesterday I received in my email, a Keith Code article, Speed and Direction and I think the article struck a chord with regard to what I’m trying to solve. The article isn’t yet posted in the articles section, so it must be new. From it, this particular section seemed relevant and as I slept overnight I awoke with a different idea on how it applies to my current barrier ”Any rider's true skill level can only be measured by his ability to determine exactly WHERE to change or maintain speed and direction and execute the right AMOUNT of each. There are no other components to skill.“
  24. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Thanks for chiming in. Point #1 How do I know that I'm hitting my marks (or not) if I do not observe my results? Well to help solve the problem of diverted attention, I will mount my action camera to the bike and review the footage later that way I can focus more on what I'm doing IN THAT MOMENT. I agree that I'm still working on moving my vision further away. I'm also working on smoothing my visual flow after so many years of snapping my head and eyes to the next point of interest. After a recent school I "got it" about visual flow. Point #2: Once I'm in the turn, I don't fight it with many-mini inputs I just try to get it next time around.
  25. Lnewqban

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    It could be that you are not following two fundamental rules of cornering: 1) Looking deep into the turn: You can only know that your trajectory is one foot off if you are looking close in front of your bike. 2) One steering for the whole turn: You may be adjusting your steering along the turn in order to achieve your goal trajectory. Think of the unintended consequences that you are creating if you are doing so, like diversion of attention, disorientation, over-stressing the front tire, etc. The way I visualize cornering trajectory: to me it is like shooting a ball into the basketball hood from a distance, you feel the cross-wind, you estimate the distance and the angle, you gut-calculate the whole flight of the ball and then you impart your best directed push hoping for the best. Sometimes you miss for little and sometimes you nail it. The hard mental, visual and calculation work in cornering happens prior the turn-in point, which is equivalent to the moment of actually pushing the ball. Let the bike "fly" describing that natural arc, free of unnecessary minute steering inputs and lean angle adjustments. Missing an apex for 12 inches may add a few feet to the corner's total trajectory, which is not a big difference for a bike that moves 88 feet per second (60 mph). Distracting your attention from proper throttle control and from reference points and from spatial location may slow your bike much more.
  26. tt675

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    It was awesome seeing u again Cobie...ttys.lu veneziano
  27. Hotfoot

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    Yes, applications are still being accepted.
  28. trueblue550

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    I have this problem with some corners as well and I'm interested in hearing what the experts have to say. I would try transitioning visually from your turn in reference point to your apex reference point a bit earlier. Also try looking at the apex reference point a little longer until you're sure you are going to hit it, then transition to the exit reference point.
  29. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    I'd been working on my accuracy. It seems that the product of that has been consistency. This means that I tend to get consistent placement on where I want to be, just not as accurate as I would like. I'm a foot or less from where I want to place my wheels, and it seems that closing that distance to apex for example is a battle with self. Best I can come up with is that it's a vision deficiency but I don't know what to do to correct it. I latched onto a faster rider, but was just unable to duplicate the lines or keep enough pace to be able to follow for more than a few corners. But I did learn something by doing so. Looking for ideas of what I can try differently. Next trackday in 2 weeks.
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