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  2. And look at the massive field compared to today 😲
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  4. Hi folks, I hope everyone's looking forward to a great 2019! I'm here to learn as much as I can before I visit CSS this Spring and probably a lot afterward too. Thanks for having me and I'll see you in the pits real soon. -Scott
  5. Spaghetti

    Turn-in point techniques

    The 250cc reaction to throttle is slower than a 600cc, especially on dirt: the engine engages traction, then it has to go up enough in rpms to develop some power, then it has to transfer power to the wheel, then the tire has to come to grip with the uneven dirt surface. All this process takes time (in fractions of a second) and it's slower the smaller the bike displacement and the surface grip (ignoring two-stroke engines of course). The extreme version of this example is a low powered go-kart. I'm sure you felt the urge to apply gas a bit before the apex if you drove one, once you got the wheels pointed correctly. None of the examples in my previous post describe an application of throttle and increasing lean at the same time.
  6. Spaghetti

    Off camber corners

    The lower grip on off-cambers is due to the bent on the track increasing the outside force (gravity) and putting slightly more pressure on the side wall. If there wasn't any difference in forces, then the bike and rider would just be on a different plane and the knee would still work as a lean angle reference point. Imaging pivoting the image of the bike+rider at lean from a flat surface to an off-camber one. The profile is exactly the same, you're just tilting the surface line. There is one small grip advantage though: when riding towards an off-camber apex the bike is going slightly uphill ("climbing" towards the apex). It's not always the case, depends how the turn is designed. This is more obvious on a sharp off-camber turn. The uphill ride loads the rear and reduces braking distance, so changing the racing line to maximize the uphill ride can improve bike stability.
  7. https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/motogp/how-i-ride-andrea-dovizioso
  8. Do not let the snow keep you away from our sport, lads and lasses! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJessYxu8CE
  9. faffi

    Off camber corners

    I would expect it to be more than just the angle between the road surface and machine/man that comes into play since you are now also facing gravity in a negative manner; it's like standing on a slope. Hence you cannot just use your knee as a guide to how far you can safely lean. Perhaps it's a case of going faster until you crash and then back off a little 😄 Personally, I treat them as I would a surface with less grip, but I only ride on the road. On a track, if you want to find the limit, I would suggest being smooth and add a little bit of speed while feeling for the tyres starting to slide. It may also be wise to square the corner off a little more than typical in order to keep apex speed lower and also the period of maximum lean shorter. All that said, you really should not listen to me because I do not actually have a clue 😔
  10. Riding with one hand forces the rider to both push and pull on the bar... The push is in my opinion more accurate but the pull can help overcome the resistance for higher speed turns. Less necessary for a light responsive bike.
  11. You must believe me when I say that I was extremely cautious before asking about this, painfully aware of how the topic of steering has generated an infinite volume of counterproductive babble. Jaybird, I do have potential riding conditions. I might even test this today. I have tried the push-pull method. In my initial attempts I inadvertently generated excessive grip/tension in the pulling hand. I find that feeling the pressure of pulling on the throttle was particularly disconcerting and made me question if I was altering the throttle (I do not think I was, I think it was a mental block, but I also shudder to think of potential problems that I may generate with the more sensitive throttle on a race replica.) Also, I read all of Hotfoot's advice with enthusiasm and she provided this: http://forums.superbikeschool.com/topic/2856-countersteering-push-or-pull/ "Having said that, I try to use only pushing when riding hard on the track, because I can get a more consistent input using a push with pivot steering. If I try to pull, I am more inclined to yank on the bar and get a bit of a wobble at the end of the input." Admittedly somewhat uninitiated, but with the above input so far, it seems counterintuitive to me that one would steer more accurately by introducing two hands into the process that a single hand could otherwise accomplish. It is most helpful for me to hang onto what you said Dylan, that you have witnessed every combination of how riders address bar pressure.
  12. No, instead of going to try it (and besides it's in the 30dF temperature range here) we'd rather discuss it ad-nauseum online until the thread is at least 500 posts. LoL (point taken, Dylan)
  13. I think this topic is simple enough to where someone can just go out and try it. In my experience I have seen every combination of rider with regard to preference on bar pressure but it does make sense that using both a push and a pull will give the most control.
  14. Finally found an almost perfect helmet - for me. I ended up with an Arai Axces 3, the cheapest in the shop. If you can call a USD500 helmet cheap. Pinlock not included, another 40 bucks. Unfortunately the cheap one, I may add; I wanted a higher level helmet with a sun visor. But those had a slightly different shape that was narrower. My head is probably of a rather unusual shape, because even the model I got should ideally have been 1/4 inch wider and a 1/4 inch shorter - and it is the widest and shortest helmet I have ever tried. Anyway, I bought one size above ideal for this very reason. The helmet is still very snug, but easier to put on and remove than anything I've owned or tried before. Also a plus is that while the head moves with the helmet, I do not bite my cheeks when I close my jaws. With the perfect size, M (57 cm or 22.45 in) the helmet was just tight enough on the sides that I knew it would feel uncomfortable after an hour or two. The L (59 cm or 23.23 in) just sits snugly with no pressure, but if I pull the helmet firmly forward, the sales-woman could get 4 tiny fingers between my forehead and the liner. However, since the helmet didn't drop down over my brows, not even when pulling on the chin bar, the sales-woman agreed to sell it to me, although she would have preferred me to go for the smaller version. I told her I would be more likely to crash if I was in pain, to which she agreed, and also since the helmet sat firmly in all directions it was deemed safe. The Arais, all of them, also work splendidly with glasses. I also tried a Shubert, and while not as painful as a Shoei, it felt "bony" like a Shoei. And the ear cavities were placed too low for my ears. So what I have learned is that Arai helmets fit me the best, with AGV helmets a clear second. And that Shoeis are still the worst for me, both in fit and also comfort; the interior feels harsh to me. Also, there are differences between one Arai to the next, and that goes for every helmet brand out there. Take your time and you should eventually find just the helmet your head need. BTW, the costliest Arai helmet on offer was the RX7V Carbon with a sticker price of NOK 31.999, or 3800 American dollars 😲
  15. Dylan, I have only found fleeting statements in TOTW where Keith writes that one can use pulling of the bar when steering. Can you expound a little on the topic? Is there a need to become skilled at push-pull steering, particularly if pivot steering is working well?
  16. How much awkwardness have you seen from students trying to change their techniques to push-pull with both? How long does it take for this to become habit in the average rider? Otherwise, I would think this could consume valuable mental processing capacity until it becomes second nature.
  17. Not detailed, but I still found it very interesting. May also explain why succeeding in one class doesn't automatically guarantee success in the other. https://www.crash.net/wsbk/news/911327/1/debutant-bautista-riding-ducati-world-superbike-250cc
  18. It's what I've been doing instinctively since I first began riding in 1980, and I find it difficult to push - or pull - only. I believe I did it like that from day one because it must have felt balanced when riding ultra-light 100cc streetbikes of the day; with no place to really anchor oneself against the forces going through the handlebars, pushing and pulling - albeit gentle - would ensure a fair balance of forces reaching the body.
  19. Dylan Code

    Newb From Ca

    The schedule is up but the Laguna dates are not finalized yet. Should be up in 24-48 hours hopefully.
  20. Regarding ease of steering: you can push the inside bar (push right bar to go right...) but you can and should also pull the opposite bar. Some people have a hard time coordinating this if they have not done so before.
  21. Dylan Code

    Off camber corners

    Generally speaking you would want to apex it where it is the most off-camber.
  22. Jaybird180

    Track walkthrough? Library

    Not exactly what you asked for, but there are a ton of YouTube videos available; some are pretty good.
  23. May seem ridiculous, are track specific photos posted anywhere in here? At. Barber for the first time and in would love to be able to flip through still shots of each corner with turn points on each photo.
  24. Hotfoot

    Turn-in point techniques

    Can you be more specific in your question? The basic throttle rule (see Twist of the Wrist II) is the same. If your specific question is in regards to Spaghetti's comment above about adding lean angle while accelerating - that action is not recommended, as it is a classic way to overload the rear tire and lose traction, but generally speaking a smaller displacement bike (assuming good tires and suspension) would be easier to manage because it has less available power to feed to the rear tire. It is pretty easy, on a modern 600 or 1000cc sport bike, to break the rear tire loose by adding throttle and lean at the same time. It is tougher to do on something like a 250cc or 300cc bike, but certainly not impossible, if you lean it over far enough and especially if you are abrupt with the throttle application. The traction control available on the S1000rr helps a great deal in avoiding applying too much throttle while leaned over, as it manages the power based on measured lean angle, however if a rider aggressively ADDS lean angle and throttle together, it is still possible to overwhelm the rear tire. I must say, though, the S1000rr is amazingly easy to ride, even for a rider new to high HP machines, the electronics in it are amazing, it has been an incredible training tool for the school.
  25. CarltonGi

    Turn-in point techniques

    What is the difference between a smaller displacement bike and a larger displacement bike in these kinds of situations? Which one is easier to handle?
  26. trueblue550

    Newb From Ca

    I had no idea the 2019 schedule was out until you posted this. THANK YOU SO MUCH. Also, welcome! Laguna Seca is a great place for a 2-day camp. Have you driven at that track?
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