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  1. Today
  2. tt675

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    Email sent.😀
  3. Yesterday
  4. TonySilva

    Steering Video No Bs Bike

    Jim Papadopoulos is a great researcher. I like the name of the email list he founded and moderated - "Hardcore Bicycle Science". Great inspiring story.
  5. Last week
  6. Lnewqban

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Excellent post, Hotfoot. 😀 It very well explains the "throttle should be open as soon as possible" line in the book. Prior reaching maximum lean or slidding state, the bike is always following the trajectory that the rider commands it to follow via steering and throttle. Good visual skills help me with the spatial awareness regarding where the bike is located at any time in a succession of turns and helps me decide about the proper moments to brake, accelerate and turn in.
  7. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Okay. I’ll go out to specifically observe this. Thank you.
  8. Hotfoot

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Yes, it could be that you are at your desired lean angle (steering action complete) but not yet pointed in the direction you want the bike to go. Sometimes there is a pause as you wait for the bike to come around onto the desired line. Turn 2 at Laguna is a GREAT example of a turn where it is VERY easy to get on the gas a little too early in the second part of the turn and miss the apex - which is punished immediately upon the exit because it is tight and forces the rider to make a correction to avoid going off track. It is also really easy to come on the throttle a little bit too early when chasing a faster rider, trying to catch up, or keep up.
  9. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Thank you. I think Hotfoot was getting at that same idea. I'll have a go at it. Question: Are we saying that steering can be complete but yet the bike is not pointed in the desired direction?...there's a time delay between relaxing the steering input and bike on line???
  10. trueblue550

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    My coach at Laguna Seca noticed I was getting on the throttle too early in the second part of turn 2. I told him the same thing, I begin a smooth, even, continuous roll on after steering is complete. He advised me that because a throttle roll-on tends to make a bike hold its line, I should begin roll-on when steering is complete and the bike is pointed where I want it to go. The little bit of extra time off the throttle did help me get a better line and drive out of the corner.
  11. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    That was a typo on my part. I meant to say: I leave some lean angle margin. Regarding my original issue: I think the solution could be: The Two Step Drill
  12. Earlier
  13. Hotfoot

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    What do you mean, when you say you leave some turning margin?
  14. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    I turn the gas on as soon as I'm done with the steering input. I do leave some turning margin. In this particular instance it was a new bike, new track and different tires so my confidence was low on knowing where where the roll limit was. I was conscious that I probably had lean angle reserve.
  15. Hotfoot

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Speaking of timing... something else to take a look at is exactly WHEN you crack the throttle on. If a rider is running a little bit wide a little before the apex (not able to make it to the desired apex) what could that tell you about the rider's throttle timing? Next time you ride pay attention to when the throttle comes on - is the bike on its line (fully leaned and pointed in the direction you want it to go) before you start to roll on the gas?
  16. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Yesterday I received in my email, a Keith Code article, Speed and Direction and I think the article struck a chord with regard to what I’m trying to solve. The article isn’t yet posted in the articles section, so it must be new. From it, this particular section seemed relevant and as I slept overnight I awoke with a different idea on how it applies to my current barrier ”Any rider's true skill level can only be measured by his ability to determine exactly WHERE to change or maintain speed and direction and execute the right AMOUNT of each. There are no other components to skill.“
  17. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    Thanks for chiming in. Point #1 How do I know that I'm hitting my marks (or not) if I do not observe my results? Well to help solve the problem of diverted attention, I will mount my action camera to the bike and review the footage later that way I can focus more on what I'm doing IN THAT MOMENT. I agree that I'm still working on moving my vision further away. I'm also working on smoothing my visual flow after so many years of snapping my head and eyes to the next point of interest. After a recent school I "got it" about visual flow. Point #2: Once I'm in the turn, I don't fight it with many-mini inputs I just try to get it next time around.
  18. Lnewqban

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    It could be that you are not following two fundamental rules of cornering: 1) Looking deep into the turn: You can only know that your trajectory is one foot off if you are looking close in front of your bike. 2) One steering for the whole turn: You may be adjusting your steering along the turn in order to achieve your goal trajectory. Think of the unintended consequences that you are creating if you are doing so, like diversion of attention, disorientation, over-stressing the front tire, etc. The way I visualize cornering trajectory: to me it is like shooting a ball into the basketball hood from a distance, you feel the cross-wind, you estimate the distance and the angle, you gut-calculate the whole flight of the ball and then you impart your best directed push hoping for the best. Sometimes you miss for little and sometimes you nail it. The hard mental, visual and calculation work in cornering happens prior the turn-in point, which is equivalent to the moment of actually pushing the ball. Let the bike "fly" describing that natural arc, free of unnecessary minute steering inputs and lean angle adjustments. Missing an apex for 12 inches may add a few feet to the corner's total trajectory, which is not a big difference for a bike that moves 88 feet per second (60 mph). Distracting your attention from proper throttle control and from reference points and from spatial location may slow your bike much more.
  19. tt675

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    It was awesome seeing u again Cobie...ttys.lu veneziano
  20. Hotfoot

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    Yes, applications are still being accepted.
  21. trueblue550

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    I have this problem with some corners as well and I'm interested in hearing what the experts have to say. I would try transitioning visually from your turn in reference point to your apex reference point a bit earlier. Also try looking at the apex reference point a little longer until you're sure you are going to hit it, then transition to the exit reference point.
  22. Jaybird180

    Consistent vs Accurate Lines

    I'd been working on my accuracy. It seems that the product of that has been consistency. This means that I tend to get consistent placement on where I want to be, just not as accurate as I would like. I'm a foot or less from where I want to place my wheels, and it seems that closing that distance to apex for example is a battle with self. Best I can come up with is that it's a vision deficiency but I don't know what to do to correct it. I latched onto a faster rider, but was just unable to duplicate the lines or keep enough pace to be able to follow for more than a few corners. But I did learn something by doing so. Looking for ideas of what I can try differently. Next trackday in 2 weeks.
  23. tt675

    2018, need more riding coaches!

    Hey Cobie, are u still taking apps for this position? Regards,lu
  24. Jaybird180

    When to upgrade

    My mechanic and I agreed that I will ride the stock suspension this weekend. The vendors that I talked with have assured me that the stock suspension will be bottomed during most of my ride. I hope that I don't break anything especially me. I've also decided that I should have bought a CRF125 instead just for the fact that it opens up an additional racing class. Maybe next year?
  25. Jaybird180

    Anticipated 34 yrs ago, still not here

    Almost there https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2017/12/05/2018-kawasaki-ninja-zx-10r-se-electronic-suspension-model-usa/ 4. The forks and shock have built-in stroke sensors that provide real-time stroke speed and compression information. The sensor coils provide input to the KECS ECU every millisecond. This is complemented by information provided by the IMU (acceleration/deceleration) every 10 milliseconds, and the FI ECU (vehicle speed) every 10 milliseconds. The KECS ECU then directs current to the solenoids to adjust damping as required by the situation.
  26. Jaybird180

    Geometry and Handling Effect of Damaged Components

    I got lucky (fingers crossed) on a set of new lower tubes and plan to change them out tomorrow. He adapted to the bike's "eccentricity" without care. I'll make the correction and won't mention it to him except casually.
  27. Jaybird180

    Development

    He cared nothing about going through the oil-dri.
  28. Jaybird180

    When to upgrade

    I just started MiniMoto racing! Trackday Father’s Day weekend on a loaner TTR125 got me hooked and I came back straightaway and bought a 97 XR100 to run the stock 100/125 class. My first race is in a week. The rules allow springs and internal modifications to the OE suspension only and I’ve been racking my brain on what to do. I have an appointment Monday to do a maintenance catchup and we were going to flush the forks but if I come with springs we can do that too. It’s too late to order the springs but I’m also wondering if I should run the stock suspension because it will force me to be smoother and improve my technique. I really felt it in the transitions on the TTR with my 200lbs upsetting the chassis every time I flinched wrong. It even put me on my butt once in a tight hairpin trying to lower my body- really my shoulder and hip. Monday morning I have a chance to stop by the store and pickup some fork oil..or not touch the forks at all- for now. But I need to stop obsessing over the research.
  29. mugget

    We Got An HP4 Race!

    I didn't really think it would be that special until I saw the below video and after reading your post there it all makes sense. Like you say - what they have done is amazing, you end up with a completely different machine building from ground up as a track/race bike rather than trying to turn a street bike into a race bike. Ducati Desmosedici RR used to be my "dream bike", but the way technology is advancing so quickly and with all this being available to Joe Public (if you have the cash...) well let's just say it's a great time to be alive!
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