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  1. Yesterday
  2. Spaghetti

    Turn-in point techniques

    There are several reasons why you would want to apply throttle before the apex, but the very important point before considering any of this is that adding lean angle while accelerating put a lot of stress on the tire. In this situation the tire can react unpredictably, losing and regaining grip uncontrollably and shaking the rider out of the bike. At any rate, when giving gas in a turn we transfer the bike weight to the rear making the front easier to handle. In a chicane, peaking up the throttle in the middle of the turns helps with the fast direction changes (but definitely not while giving the first strong lean input). Also when riding on bumps ideally you want to open the throttle, for the same weight transfer reasons. Another reason is engaging traction sooner. Racers tend to give some gas before the apex to start engaging traction and power up immediately after the apex. This is a lot more obvious in flat track or dirt riding when riding through the turns with a smaller displacement bike. Finally in very long turns we have no choice unless we want to park the bike somewhere in the middle of the turn. I prefer the expression "picking up the throttle" to "maintenance throttle", because it the former gives better the idea of a minimal input.
  3. Earlier
  4. AdamZisa

    Turn-in point techniques

    As Cobie stated, there won't be one single answer as every road/ track will have variations of turns, angle of the road, surface differences, etc. I was at Thunderhill West in June and learned that I was accelerating through a turn that I could have just used my momentum to get through and I was faster in doing so. Some people might call it "coasting" or engine braking. I just know that down the straight I would see Turn 1, enter Turn 1, and would not get back on the throttle until exiting Turn 2. My momentum carried me through. When I used the throttle at the exit of T1 and into T2, I would have too much speed and have to move around a lot to try to catch my already missed apex and try to set up for the next turn. It was too much! A lot going on and more reacting rather than having a plan. The track/ road itself does not move around or change much. It is the rider that is the unknown variable! Have a plan for each turn you take. Hope your first track day went well!
  5. RoyShepard

    Steering Video No Bs Bike

    Content is great. I wish I could convince more people to do actual research and learning, and y'all make it so easy too!
  6. The Bridge Builder

    Dunlop Q4!

    Awesome info. Thanks Dylan.
  7. Dylan Code

    Dunlop Q4!

    Sure if it's cold the Q4 would probably be a better choice than the slicks but the slicks will grip better when they have warmed up. Yes if someone wants to upgrade to the Q4 that's no problem.
  8. ducatmh

    Dunlop Q4!

    Bummer! Perhaps you guys can provide them as an option for the Code RACE? I typically opt for the slicks on those days, but would be nice to have an option for something stickier than the Q3+ that will heat up a little faster than the slicks.
  9. ducatmh

    2018 S1000RR Setup for Success

    Reporting back after a full day on track. Wow! Maybe it's all in my head (the power of suggestion) but by making a few of the adjustments, I found that braking later felt noticeably smoother, more controlled, and less distracting than before. I also found that the bike did in fact hold the line better on faster exits. Confidence levels were high! The only issue I have found in trying to set up the suspension so far is that I can't quite get in the ideal "Rider Sag Range" with the OE springs. It's still off by about -4mm up front with the preload backed out. It clearly handled well regardless so I will have to decide if I want to make the swap in the off season or leave it as is.
  10. Cobie Fair

    Our man Travis Wyman

    That's pretty dang cool...if there hadn't been a second red flag, wonder where he would have ended up? 11th to 5th in 2 laps! I'm not biased though.
  11. The Bridge Builder

    Turn-in point techniques

    What's up JP_636. I took the Level and Level 2 course at NJMP. I went back and read TOTW2 again and it talks about how the suspension while exiting the turn. I used to describe it a "squat" but the technical term is "weight transfer" according to the book. LOL.... You want a transfer of 10-20% of weight off the front to the rear. Once you get the bike on the line you want "GET IT ON" meaning you want to get the throttle on so that the weight transfer happens. Accelerate smoothly and enjoy the sensation. My 2 cents
  12. The Bridge Builder

    Our man Travis Wyman

    http://www.roadracingworld.com/news/motoamerica-even-more-from-the-races-at-pittsburgh-international-race-complex/
  13. Lnewqban

    Corner Exit Body Position/Street BP

    About your #2 question: Your priority for street riding should be safety, which has more to do with high alertness, with good judgement of entry speed, with understanding of traffic situations and with proficient visual skills. Your body position should be such that it serves as a good base for those things, it should be comfortable, it should keep you in total control of the machine. The extreme body positions that you see in track practices and races are not really necessary if you ride within or not much above legal speed limits. The lean angles and cornering forces on your tires should be moderate, so you will always have a safety margin or reserve to use in unexpected road hazards or traffic emergencies. You can experiment with leaning only your torso and head into the turn or even hang off your hips some, finding your most comfortable and safe body position. I would avoid dragging knees on public streets, but would know how to increase leaning angle and assertively swerve as emergency maneuvers.
  14. Hey everyone! After watching TOTW 2 i have a lot better understanding of cornering and body position, etc, i've done a lot of research and feel i have a good grasp on most it except for when it comes to corner exits, as well as your body position for twisties. So! 1. For corner exits, you shouldn't lift your butt off the seat to position yourself for the next corner or to center yourself back on the seat until your bike is straight up, but it is safe to center your torso, head, and arms while standing the bike up, you just have to wait till the bike is completely straight up and down to adjust your lower body so you don't risk de-stabilizing the bike. Is this correct?? 2. When you hit up the twisties (intermediate riding, nothing too aggressive) is it necessary to stick your leg out/butt off the seat when cornering, or should you only be using proper your upper body position (outside arm across tank, inside arm pointing down, kissing mirror, and proper vision etc.). I was told it wasn't necessary on the street to move your lower since you wont be dragging knee (my goal on the street isn't to drag knee anyways, i just want to practice proper body position, throttle control, vision techniques, and lines). My confusion is because on some videos i see riders who aren't in steep lean angles stick there knees out anyways, and others who just stick their upper body out. With only the upper body pushed out, are you still shifting the center of gravity? I just want to know what you guys do/recommend is proper. Thanks again for any input/recommendation!!
  15. JP_636

    Turn-in point techniques

    Thanks to all that replied! I finally watched TOTW 2 and i definitely have a better understanding now. I plan on getting the book and reading it here soon too 🤘🏻
  16. jcw

    Turn-in point techniques

    The reason given was that the suspension works better loaded rather than unloaded. I suppose it is similar to TOTW2. the idea of the best weight distribution coming from slowly rolling on the throttle, but the way it was presented is confusing.
  17. Track day TRACK YAYYYYYYYYYY I will be at Chuckwalla September 22-23, riding on the 23rd. If anyone is out there and wants to meet up, LETS GOOOOOOOOOOO! Arizona Motorsports Park October 21st! Riding in A-Group, must ride with faster people and realize I can keep pace. Let me know if you will be there, we usually have a large crew of my family members eating and hanging out....but none of them ride on track!!!! It would be great to ride with people I know! Chuckwalla November 10-11, riding on the 11th! Come play!
  18. AdamZisa

    VIR August 8/9

    As soon as I saw the photo, I was shouting (in my head), "GET IT GET IT!!!!" Glad you had a great time! It is definitely an amazing learning experience. Go forth and conquer!
  19. Hotfoot

    Turn-in point techniques

    I can see why that would be confusing, especially if there was not a exact explanation of specifically WHEN to roll on the throttle and WHY. What, exactly, was the stated purpose of that before turn roll-on you describe in that mantra you mentioned? "Maintenance throttle" is s term that is thrown around a lot but different people seem to have different ideas of what it is supposed to mean. I personally have heard at least three different definitions. Twist of the Wrist II gives a detailed and straightforward explanation of good throttle control, might want to have another look at that if you haven't in a while.
  20. jcw

    Turn-in point techniques

    OP, I see where you are coming from. David Moss has this mantra I've been seeing on his facebook videos- brake- throttle- turn. And it confused me at first. Unless you think of it as maintenance throttle rather than actually accelerating. Still, even then I'm confused a little. My impression of TOTW and reading here is that you simply don't want to get into the habit of accelerating and adding lean angle Even if at your speed and skill level you are far from the limit of the tire. As you get faster, it's simply too easy to shoot right past the warning signs of approaching the limit. At the same time you want that throttle control where you are gradually rolling on the throttle while trading off lean angle. Ideally you want to set up your corner so you can accomplish this. Obviously, it's not always possible on the street. At least that's my take... I mean when you are really lapping around a track and feeling fast and you set up the corner right and make your pivot steering input, I can't imagine rolling on the throttle at that time as well. It seems like too much is going on with the chassis much like you don't want to be moving around in your seat at this time either. Once you release the inside bar pressure, settle down in the seat, then I can see rolling on maintenance throttle. Then it's a gradual roll on the throttle while coming out of your lean.
  21. Cobie Fair

    Our man Travis Wyman

    Anyone been keeping an eye out on Travis and his racing?
  22. ducatmh

    2018 S1000RR Setup for Success

    I'll let you know for sure. Thanks for getting me in touch with Johnny on this!
  23. Cobie Fair

    2018 Predictions- WSBK, MotoGP

    Saw a pass on a coach the other day at NJMP that was a bit suspect, was it that dog you are holding?
  24. Cobie Fair

    2018 S1000RR Setup for Success

    I'll be interested to hear too...
  25. Cobie Fair

    Turn-in point techniques

    Hi JP, Your questions are good. There are a number of factors that come into play, and one answer won't work for all turns/situation. The one that will give the most problems is increasing throttle and lean angle together, that's usually a big no-no. Have you read any of Twist of the Wrist 2, or seen the video? That will give you some great guidelines. Best, Cobie
  26. JP_636

    Turn-in point techniques

    Once the weather cools off more, i'm looking into doing my first track day! In the meantime, i'm researching cornering and body techniques but im confused when in comes to what you should be doing with the throttle once you hit your turn-in point. According to the multiple sites i've visited and videos i've watched people either 1. Engine brake through the turn-in point, until they finish leaning over then they gradually/smoothly apply throttle through the apex and exit. 2. Use "Maintenance Throttle" through the turn-in point, again until your at your desired lean angle then gradually apply throttle through the apex and exit. 3. At the turn in point gradually start applying throttle through the entire corner and exit (Although i thought when you apply lean angle you shouldn't be applying throttle at the same time?) Are these just different cornering techniques used? Is it safe to engine brake through a corner? Is one more effective/practical (such as for Street vs Track?) I'm as new as it comes to this, any feedback would be greatly appreciated, Thanks!!
  27. Dylan Code

    Dunlop Q4!

    No we are going to be sticking with the Q3+ on the fleet bikes due to its all around versatility, durability, etc.
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