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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/25/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I went to Thunderhill West this past weekend with my dad. I was doing level 4 for Saturday and Sunday. Saturday felt great, I learned the track, I felt fast, and left feeling like I could get through the track comfortably. Sunday came and for some reason it was a different story. I went off track three times and would let my SR's take over in Turn 1. I could not figure it out. I felt like I was only adding 10-15 mph down the straight just to up my pace. Why was this such a big deal?! First of all, after consulting with Johnny, adding that much speed is too much. I needed to add it gradually, 1 mph at a time even. Gerry was my coach for Sunday. We found that my vision was hindering me. By adding that much speed, I had to PLAN for my turn point earlier. I just kept focusing on the turn point itself and by the time I hit it, I was already beyond it and therefore turning in late with a new sense of speed....I would panic and become stiff on the bars. Gerry coached me to look WAYYY ahead. Go at my normal pace, and look wayyyyy ahead at Turn 1. I did and suddenly the track felt slower. I felt like I was scooting along on a pedal bicycle down the straight and going into Turn 1. I got my lap times recorded for Sunday. My fastest lap time of a 1:40 was during my second session, when I was still affected by my vision. Surrounding that time was a bunch of 1:50's or even 2:00 +. Crazy variance..... After listening to Gerry and using my vision to slow things down for the last session, my lap times were consistently 1:43 1:44 and staying in that range. I know it is slower, but the consistency is important. This shows me that if I can stay consistent, I can begin to work on my speed. I was doing the same thing every single lap and talking to myself in my helmet, "2 step, no greys." This meant use the two step and look way ahead. No greys meant to not hit the gray curbing at all and to look 4-inches to the side of the curbing so I could place my front wheel there. I wanted to thank Gerry and Big Andy for their coaching on both days as well as Johnny for his consulting between sessions both days. We came up with a plan every time and after execution, the results were showing in timed laps as well as overall confidence on the track. Gerry also taught me how to use my peripheral vision to sense movement. This would help with passing others and my goodness it made such a difference to my whole experience!!! I was passing other riders safely and with enough space and speed. It really changed things. I cannot wait to implement this at my next track day/ race. I will take time today to write down my plan for my home tracks and how to approach different corners. I really like that once you leave a track with CSS and go to your home track, you can apply what you learned to your home track. You did not have to sit there and say, "okay I learned the track with them...why don't them come here so I can learn my track with them?" It is more like, "OH! This turn is JUST LIKE turn 2 at Thunderhill! I know how to do this!" Thank you all for the great weekend and learning. We will be back and my dad wants to do Level II! The photo below is of my dad and I. I caught up with him for the photo op to look like a doofus (I am on 21 and he's on 22).
  2. 2 points
    I have never been to the California Superbike School but I have read and watched Twist Of The Wrist 2 so many times it is engrained in my brain. Keith Code's instruction on the 2 Step Vision Technique is by far what has improved my riding the most. Everything has slowed down for me in my mind resulting in the bike going faster. I live in Banff National Park (Canada) and there is a one way mountain road which is very track like. I have ridden this hundreds of times not worrying about oncoming traffic. I use this road to work on body position, trail braking, flick rates, throttle control and of course VISION. Yesterday I ran off the road at a good speed. I do wear all the gear including an Air Bag vest which worked very well. Just like a Moto GP rider I was more mad at myself than hurt and was worried about my bikes condition. I have been going over the incident in my head all night and all day today trying to figure out what I did wrong. I now know what it was. On this particular corner I did not 2 step properly (look ahead into the turn early enough) and all my survival reactions took over. I panicked because of my speed and hit the brakes bringing the bike up. I then target fixated on the side of the road and I froze on the bars. Nothing could help me now as I flipped the bike in the ditch. This could make someone not want to ride for a while but when you can identify why things went wrong it makes it much better. I owe this confidence to Keith Code and his teachings. It is important to note that even after doing something hundreds if not thousands of times we can still fall victim to our survival reactions. They can creep in any time but as long as you know what the causes are you can deal with them and learn. I must confess that I really don't feel like riding right now at all but hope that changes soon. Thanks Keith and to the female truck driver who helped me pick my bike up. Don Dagg
  3. 2 points
    Bottom line up front: the bike is extraordinary, awesome, phenomenal. Why: It is build bottom up as a track-specific bike. Different from a World Superbike that started out as a street bike, this was built as a track bike from the bottom up. Somehow it was incredibly user-friendly. Any intermediate level and up rider will love it. Handling: Zero changes on the suspension, the bike would not only hold a line, it went anywhere you wanted it to go. Very easy to set it on a line. Rough pavement (at Willow Springs) was no problem. At our race school I was able to make passes over a bumpy outside section where other riders would avoid. Power: Super linear. Never really hit hard suddenly. The mapping it came with is very manageable and a perfect balance of outright power and user-friendly delivery. 3rd and 4th gear power wheelies are easy and very progressive--not sudden. It definitely is far more powerful than a stock S1000RR. Gearbox: This was something that surprised me. Super-smooth and positive shifts. The stock gearbox is just fine but this one was even better with a very positive feel and great travel. Electronics: The traction control is audible; you can hear it coming in with a fluttering sound which is very helpful to get the immediate feedback on what the bike is doing on that. The dash is a race dash with a very simple interface and easy to control and change settings. Launch control: just like the GP bikes! So cool. Used it today at our Race School. Took off like a scalded cat. Finish: Every thing is so tidy under the seat where the battery and datalogger are. Nothing missing, nothing extra. Most bolts are drilled titanium. Wiring harness is custom with nothing xtra, but there are jacks for additional sensors like brake pressure and suspension travel. Brakes: Zero fade. Excellent feel. Some travel but not too much, very linear. Weight: Holy sheet. It's 6lbs lighter than a 300 Ninja when it's fully wet. Wow so easy to transition. I have video of two women lifting the bike completely off the ground. HP4R Price: $78,000. Engine replacement at 3,100 miles. Yoshimura superbike: $300,000. Engine rebuild at 700 miles. Graves Superbike: +/- $150,000 estimated. Engine rebuild at 1,200 +/-. BMW World Superbike: $120,000. Engine rebuild/replacement at 1,000 +/- Privateer MotoAmerica Yamaha Superbike: $60,000. Engine rebuild/replacement at 1,000 +/- and lots of bugs to fix and iron out, lower spec brakes and components. Any true superbike price is very hard to nail down because the development is the real cost. The parts are reflected above, but double, triple, quadruple is spent in development and testing at the track. Just one weekend testing is serious dollars. What you get with the HP4R is significantly more that you could ever get if you started with a stock S1000RR and tried to build a superbike from there. It's really a totally dialed in and balanced package. I had the owner of a local performance shop ride the bike from Motorsports Exotica, who said after getting off the bike: "I've ridden bikes with twice the money into them that don't even come close to this bike."
  4. 1 point
    How's the suspension on this bike? I imagine the ohlins feels great. What changes have you had to make from going from one track to another across the country? Did you even bother setting sag? The HP4Race is much lighter, is the chassis size the same? Or does the adjustable seat height, rear sets, clip-ons make it feel different in comfort from an s1000rr? Do you notice a significant difference in drive for the different tracks at different elevations? I heard the world superbikes are really sensitive to this. How have you adjusted your riding for this lighter, easier steering, deeper braking bike? Are you hanging off differently? Are you carrying more brakes into the corners because you feel more stable? Since it can handle higher corner speeds than a regular 1000cc, are you prioritizing going around corners faster like a 600cc or are you riding it just like the school teaches with focus on exit drive? Or perhaps just a mix of both?
  5. 1 point
    Not only is this very entertaining, it gave me some good ideas to share with my son for next year's science project!
  6. 1 point
    This is pretty funny
  7. 1 point
    Here is some info from Dylan that you might find interesting: Dunlop just released a new sportbike tire, the Q4. This tire is different from what many think it is. It is NOT an improved Q3+ but rather a whole new category of tire. Its purpose is to provide a street legal tire with excellent grip, no need for warmers, that is at home on the track or on your favorite twisty road. Essentially it fills the gap between the Q3+ and the street legal race tire, the GPA Pro. So the progression looks like this: Q3+. Best all purpose tire. Harder center band for commuting, with sides well suited for cornering. Q4. Best for trackdays and canyons/twisty roads. Warms fast, less sensitive to pressure settings. Single compound across entire tread. Any loss in overall mileage is gained in grip compared to Q3+. GPA Pro. Essentially a race slick with grooves. Warmers strongly recommended particularly when cool and pressures checked and set before riding. Street legal. Poor choice for commuting but good for twisty roads and very much at home on the track. Slicks. Pure track only tire. Warmers strongly recommended with pressures checked and set before riding.
  8. 1 point
    Do you know how that pressure was determined? Was the goal best grip or was there a trade off for better tire life? No wrong answer here and I wouldn't at all fault for trying to get a bit more life out of them for the school. And, I know at that pressure my tires perform really well but just wondering what the method was of determining that pressure?
  9. 1 point
    Hey, this picture looks much better, hear head, neck and shoulders look more turned into the (imaginary) corner and more relaxed, your knee is more open to the right so your elbow looks less crowded, and the angle of your wrist looks more comfortable as well. Does it feel better? "Rotating around the tank" (not a desirable situation) is when you are sitting TOO close to the gas tank, so that when you try to shift your hips to the side to hang off, your upper thigh bumps into the tank and tends to force your hips to turn the WRONG way, so that instead of opening your hips into the corner, you end up twisting them away from the direction of the turn, which tends to pull your outside knee away from tank and mess up your lock-on. When you see riders with their butt hanging WAY off but their upper body crossed back over the tank and their head ending up in the middle or even the wrong side (and/or holding themselves up with a stiff inside arm) that is often the cause. The easiest way to understand it is to try it - scoot ALL the way forward so you are up against the tank. Then try scooting your hips to the side and see how the tank restricts your movement or forces you to twist the wrong way. Then try moving back a bit in the seat (typically about a fist size space between tank and crotch is a good starting point, might need to go back more if your legs are long) and try it again and see how much easier it is to move your hips over, and to rotate your hips the INTO the turn instead of the opposite. Let me know if that makes sense.
  10. 1 point
    The additional photos do help. To me, your right shoulder looks like it is pushed farther forward on the rights than your left shoulder on the left turns, which goes back to possibly having your butt over too far on the rights, and not being able to rotate your body (shoulders and hips) towards the turn. The hips want to counter rotate, loosens the grip of the outside knee, creates a feeling like you are falling off to the inside, pushes the right shoulder forward and creates tension and an awkward position on the right side. Are you clear about what I mean when I say "rotate your hips/shoulders into the turn"? If not, let me know and I have some better ways to explain that. Another thing I see is that your wrist looks a little awkward on your throttle hand. For some, changing hand position on the throttle to more of a "screwdriver" grip can make it easier to turn the throttle in right hand turns. Instead of having your wrist straight and having to make a motion where you move your hand up and down at the wrist, you can hold the throttle more like you'd hold a screwdriver, allowing you to rotate at the wrist instead of flexing it, does that make sense? It changes the angle of your forearm and can give you more freedom of movement and allow you to drop your elbow more easily. Something worth trying, to see if it helps.
  11. 1 point
    It's a little hard to tell just seeing it from the back side so take this with a grain of salt, but it looks to me like you are hanging your butt/hips off just a little bit too far on the right versus the left. On the left side you look comfortable and secure, and you are rotating your hips a bit to the left (into the turn) which sets you up nicely to get your upper body and head low and off to the left. Comparatively, on the right side, it looks to me like you scoot your butt over farther, and can't rotate your hips as much into the corner, which seems to compromise the lock in of your outside knee and make it more awkward to get your upper body down and to the right. Some things to check: 1) Are you too close to the tank to be able to rotate your hips towards the inside of the corner? Try scooting back just a little and see if it makes it easier. 2) Can you lock in your outside (left) knee as solidly on right turns as you can your outside (right) knee of left hand turns? If not, try not moving your hips quite so far to the rights on your right turns, rotate your hips a little more to the inside (right hip more toward the rear of the bike), and see if that pushes your left knee more solidly into a lock position on the tank. 3) Have you attended a school and done the "hip flick" exercise from Level 3? Making a smooth, consistent movement of the hips without bouncing on the pegs or adding any bar input is a benefit of that drill. I know you said you are not holding onto the bars... but that would be one of the most common reasons for the bike feeling like it "wants to abruptly tip over", either during the transition or once hanging off - a really small amount of input can make a really big difference. One obvious thing that is different on rights versus lefts is that you have the throttle control in your right hand. Any chance that when you roll on the throttle you are putting some forward (steering) pressure on that right bar, causing the bike to lean over more (or faster) than you expect?
  12. 1 point
    Nice post, Lnewqban. Jaybird, what is it that you are trying to fix or figure out? We know from riding our no BS bike at the school that you can get a bike to drift to one side by hanging weight off to one side - as Lnewqban addresses quite well above. But we also know that it is slow and imprecise, and anyone who has ridden the no BS bike recognizes immediately that they are not in control of the motorcycle when their hands are on the fixed bars. Given a slow enough speed and enough time and space to accomplish it, you can get the bike to turn, but it is hardly effective enough to get one around a racetrack or avoid an obstacle. You can see a clear demonstration of this in the Twist II DVD, you can see the effects of weight shift, how the the bike reacts and how the bars react. I'm not quite clear whether you are trying to address hanging weight off to the inside, or talking about weighting one peg without moving the Center of Mass, the effects are different. More importantly, what challenge are you facing in your riding that has you asking about this? (Or is it all just an academic dicussion ? )
  13. 1 point
    Most discussions of steering and "weight shift", "loading" and "helps it to steer" are riddled with illogic, and the people discussing will not reach a conclusion predicated on so many errors in thought. Rather, going to the basics of logic is the best way forward lest they get entangled permanently in confusions. Forums have become a popular platform to air ones flawed thought process, while other visitors try in vain to overhaul their whole logical approach to problem solving. Not saying I've got logic down myself, but some statements and articles have so many flaws, it's like: "where do we start?..." and just skip it. Remember when you have contrary facts, one or both are false. Some things to consider: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consistency https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Validity
  14. 1 point
    Well I think you've read enough data here and there to have plenty of food for thought. Really the rest is up to you to experiment with. It seems to me that a person like you is all about the journey vs the destination so enjoy your journey!
  15. 1 point
    That’s ironic you link the wiki article. I have read it. they describe countersteering by weight shifting and being able to initiate turns by making the bike lean right or left through peg weighting. You may not change the center of mass very much, but the fact that bike is now leaned, it induces the front wheel to swivel and create the countersteering input. ‘They point out that the movement is minor the heavier the vehicle is, but might this be what is best in the middle of a turn to hold a line if needed? its not that I don’t believe in countersteering, it obviously is the most effective way of getting to your lean angle quickly. I just wanted input on how much weight I should have on the seat vs crouching on the pegs. Now that you’ve made it somewhat clear, I can make my adjustments. i went out for a ride and found a nice feeling of stability cornering when firmly seated on the bike. And I was surprised at how much I was actually squatting on the pegs before and how hard it was to break the habit the faster I entered. I still felt like I wanted to be up on the pegs as it felt I was in better control of the bike, but I know this is not my goal. Maybe it’s a survival reaction, like I’m ready to jump off if I slide. Lol. my goal is to be in position before the corner. Enter the corner firmly seated in good position to apply the initial countersteering input. Get to my lean angle without moving my body position around to upset the bike. Then, pick up the apex and apply gradual throttle to settle the suspension, then the exit point, maybe at this point move the upper body or weight the outer peg or counter steer to get the bike up and out of the lean.
  16. 1 point
    Bashir, In 1 above: it might be needed to roll off...true double apex is in essence 2 turns. Some might just need to pause on the throttle. In 2 above: have a look at your quote from T2--he's talking about fully and correctly control the throttle at the exit. Make sense? CF
  17. 1 point
    May I suggest that the issue isn't the need to tighten the line, but something going on with line selection and plan execution? Otherwise, what are the reasons why someone would want to tighten a line mid-corner? Immediately what comes to mind are decreasing radius (DR) turns, but I'm sure there are other reasons.... In a DR, adding another steering input is necessary because it's really 2 turns in rapid succession. Is your speed and trajectory set for the 2nd turn or are all of your eggs in the 1st turn's basket? Is the bike's steering geometry working for or against you? How do you change the equation?
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