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Showing most liked content since 12/07/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    There’s an article with an objective performance data comparison of vintage vs modern sportbikes. Maybe later today I’ll see if I can find it again.
  2. 2 points
    That would look like me getting out of the driveway - LoL
  3. 2 points
    Simon possibly thinks he knows what CSS teaches but only has former students' information about CSS to try and glean what is taught. That's the dictionary definition of the word hearsay. He never did any of our schools. Often these students who hop around to different trainers misunderstand pretty much anything they are told and then give each subsequent trainer a foul impression of other trainers who came before them. The biggest problem/confusion is that there is not one. Simon says to turn with the throttle off, Keith says to get the throttle on when the steering is completed. Those two are the same thing. Now to take up your points on anti-squat and "better" steering geometry. It appears that your surface understanding of a truly complex subject of motorcycle geometry will only get you tangled up in a ball of yarn unless you seek to further educate yourself--outside motorcycle forums. Your biggest clue would be to seek out what "trail" is and what "normal trail" is and what happens to it when the front brake is applied, and seek to differentiate between "turning", "leaning" and "carving an arc". Also what an increase in trail mid turn would do for a motorcycle.
  4. 1 point
    I've been thinking about this new chapter (I could almost swear it wasn't in my book before- LoL) and it seems that there's a jewel in there about the bike steering about the rear wheel (once leaned over). And it makes sense to me. But there's a part of me that having a hard time with it and it's the mantra about 40/60 F/R weight distribution and using the throttle properly to arrive at that ratio and NOT exceeding it. Then that chapter goes on to point out that one could lift the front while leaned over and the bike will continue through the corner. I've seen it done many times (on TV, haven't experienced it myself). So if this is the case, why do we care about 40/60? Looking through the forum, I came across another thread where I somewhat asked a similar question regarding roll-on rates...which tells me that I've got plenty to understand about the topic of throttle management.
  5. 1 point
    To those who have ridden a lot of bikes over the years - if you took the best sport motorcycles from yesteryear and put them up against the current bikes of the same size but less sporty, fitted them with the same tires (where possible) and sent them around a race track, which would win? I'm asking because people have told me for quite some time that modern bikes, even budget bikes, are so much better than the stuff just a decade old. In my experience, my FZ07 has suspension no better than what many bikes could offer in the 80s, so I do not buy this. However, I could very well be wrong. So what if you teamed up something like these pairs, do you reckon the latest would beat the oldest every time? Or would it be the older sport bikes taking the honour? 1992 CBR900RR vs 2017 CB1000R 1993 GSX-R750 vs 2017 GSX750S 1994 ZX-9R vs 2018 Z900 1994 FZR600 vs 2017 FZ6R 1994 916 vs 2017 Multistrada 950
  6. 1 point
    Thanks, but not really. If you compare an old superbike to a new model, the older will be slower. It may be better at some details, but overall the modern bike will reign supreme. That's why I wonder how and old superbike would stack up against a current standard or sports tourer. Is the suspension better or worse on a 1992 CBR900RR than what you find on the CB1100RS of today, for instance? Or the new Z900. What about brakes? Handling? I'm curious because I personally believe 25 year old superbikes, as they were new, can still beat many current "normal" bikes when it comes to suspension and handling, and match them when it comes to the brakes. But I cannot be sure.
  7. 1 point
    We got some winter here and I took my Virago-come-scrambler out for a spin. Hard work! I have been riding a lot on winter roads on bicycles when growing up, as well as 3 winters on motorcycles before, but this - at about 530 lb - is by far the heaviest two-wheeled vehicle I have taken onto snow and ice. The tyres didn't impress, either, and combined with my limited skills when it comes to playing made things less than elegant. But at least I got to spin up some figure eights for the first time in my life, although they also proved the expected lack of talent. Still, I had fun, but during my commutes I stay away from playing since the front tucks every time the rear starts to spin up - I'd rather stay upright than topple over trying to look cool
  8. 1 point
    The bike on ice was very interesting...and funny The last video...what made it change direction like that? This is why race bikes should always have a dead-man switch.
  9. 1 point
    Any of them. Just see the Off-Track coach for the day and schedule a time to ride it.
  10. 1 point
    I know sometimes it feels like you're pushing down on the bars to turn but you're not. You're pushing forward which makes that side of the bike lean down which makes your hand feel the downward motion. I know some people claim they're able to turn with foot pressure and/or body english to cause the bike to lean but both methods are simply riding no hands. A) it's way way less effective than with hands. You claim 60% as effective but this is easily disproved on a skid pad or an obstacle course. Estimating based on how you feel is not useful and of course, it varies on speed. Try changing lanes no-handed at 60 then repeat the process using push-pull. B ) riding no hands still requires counter steering. It just happens with less force and happens in reverse. Instead of turning the bars left to lean right, you lean right to turn the bars left. To the foot-peg steering method, the only thing outer peg pressure achieves is enabling you to put more inner bar pressure. Just like you jump from your left foot to make a right handed layup, when you push on the left peg, you effectively harness your body's ability to push on the right bar with your right hand. If you ever doubt it, take your hands off the bars, push with your left foot and stick your head out over the right. You will probably list lazily to the right but it's a quite a bit less effective than what you're actually doing (even if you don't realize it). These facts are true on a sportbike, a Harley, and my 15 lb road bike.
  11. 1 point
    So this might be a dumb question, and I apologize if it is..lol I sometimes have issues trusting my front tire when I am at lean and need to make a steering correction (tightening up the turn). I have really been practicing the hook turn technique and while it helps in situations where the correction is small, on situations where I need to lean the bike over more, I find myself reluctant to countersteer further. It's really a matter of trusting the front tire. So my question is: while I am maintaining throttle, in say a 40 degree lean angle, can I countersteer further? Does the rate of speed matter (Am I able to at 50mph and not at 100mph)? This is something that has kind of plagued my growth as of late. I get into the corner with some speed, get on the throttle and if a correction needs to be made, I cease roll on and maintain throttle and get my head and shoulders lower to the inside of turn. This obviously works because this isn't a story of a crash I had, but can I just use the handle bars and countersteer further? (or do both) I know that counterseering is used to set lean angle at the beginning of the turn, but is it smart to do it mid corner as long as you aren't on the gas? And where's the limit? I hope I've explained this right. I'm working on getting to you guys in April at Streets for the weekend.. stoked.
  12. 1 point
    My....how things have changed in 27 years
  13. 1 point
    Cool story. Read this: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-bicycle-problem-that-nearly-broke-mathematics/#
  14. 1 point
    He's not the first world champion to demonstrate with his words that he doesn't understand much about the physics of how how a bike actually steers. It's just proof that actually understanding how bikes work is not a prerequisite to becoming one of the best riders on the planet. Strange but true.
  15. 1 point
    I wonder whether that 25 Correction Points is listed/mentioned somewhere? I did the Steering Drill during a 2-Day Camp - and I think several points to "fix."
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