faffi

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About faffi

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  1. I still think the benefit of hanging off is portrayed as far too beneficial in that pohot-comparison. A little time ago I posted this I have included the original content further below for your convenience. But what we see here is that hanging out will reduce the combined lean about 3 degrees, and hanging off will gain about 3 degrees, giving a difference of 6 degrees in bike lean between the two. So the difference in those pictures should be 6 degrees, not 16. Also worth noting is that the motard will corner equally fast with the rider leaning out and sticking a leg out as by hanging off. The German test I refer to were done during constant cornering speeds to erase issues like turn-in that can create big variations depending on the technique used. in other words, hanging off alone doesn't make a huge impact. It matters, but I am positive other issues carry more importantance, like quick turn-in, throttle and brake control and more. On the road, when visibility is limited, hanging off will give you a significantly reduced observation of the road ahead compared to hanging off, for instance, meaning one have to ride according to the conditions on public roads more than anything. ORIGINAL POST Slowest and fastest: Ducati Diavel, rider pushing bike down, bike lean 41 degrees, combined lean 38, corner speed 47 kph Marq Marques on his MotoGP bike, hanging off, bike lean 62 , combined lean 66, speed 78 kph Honda Fireblade, rider sitting straight, bike and combined lean 45, speed 55 kph Honda Fireblade, rider pushing bike down, bike lean 46, combined lean 43, speed 53 kph Honda Fireblade, rider hanging off, bike lean 48, combined 51, speed 61 kph Honda FIreblade, Pirelli SBK Qualifier, hanging off, bike 51, combined 53, speed 65 kph Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, rider pushing bike down, bike lean 57, combined 51, speed 62 kph Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, rider sitting straight, bike and combined lean 47, speed 57 kph Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, rider hanging off, bike lean 46, combined 51, speed 62 kph
  2. Ah, my mistake - I thought this was about motorcycles Even at my age (53) and not too great a shape, I can do 45-60 min at 178 bpm on a stepping machine. Max bpm for me is 190. I cannot reach the heart rate on a bicycle because my legs gets full of lactic acid well before my heart rate gets up there. Again, though, max heart rate can vary a lot between individuals and doesn't really say anything about the shape you are in. From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_rate Maximum heart rate[edit] The maximum heart rate (HRmax) is the highest heart rate an individual can achieve without severe problems through exercise stress,[16][17] and generally decreases with age. Since HRmax varies by individual, the most accurate way of measuring any single person's HRmax is via a cardiac stress test. In this test, a person is subjected to controlled physiologic stress (generally by treadmill) while being monitored by an ECG. The intensity of exercise is periodically increased until certain changes in heart function are detected on the ECG monitor, at which point the subject is directed to stop. Typical duration of the test ranges ten to twenty minutes.
  3. I just mentioned COTA since it was the most recent race, but if you are a motogp.com member and watch races from the 90s and compare them with races of today, it seems like the bikes currently seems closer to the ragged edge. In 1992 the 500GP bikes probably had around 190 hp and weighed just 130 kg, so power-to-weight was in the ballpark.
  4. I just watched a few races from 1992 and was stunned by how much smoother and in control they looked back then compared to today! I remember the 1980s, when the big two-strokes were bucking and weaving and protesting - especially Gardner's Honda - but by 1992, all was calm. Hardly a wheel off line at any point, nor a wobble or a weave. The only thing similar with today was that there seemed to be next to no warning before they lost the front or, in a few cases, got high-sided. If you watched the COTA race, you will have seen many riders sliding, wobbling and bobbing quite a bit, lap after lap. Now, do you think this is a result of the electronic aids allowing them to be less accurate, or that they race closer to the ragged edge today or something else?
  5. Amazing!
  6. The cause of the high bpm rate is that they are scared silly. Senna had a similar high bpm during races. F1 drivers, and probably riders as well, only breathe on the straights, never under braking and cornering. The brain constantly scream "you are going to die if you continue like this", hence the high bpm simply out of pure fear. They are that close to the limit. Mika Hakkinen once said that when he braked for the chicane at Monza at the 130 metre mark, going from 353 to 80 kph in that short distance, he had to fight his survival instincts every single lap all weekend. Because the brain refused to accept that it was possible, even after doing it repeatedly. Senna said that every time he got back in his F1 car after the winter break, he got petrified because everything happened so quickly that no matter how hard he had driven his Ferrari on the streets, he was in no way prepared for the shock of the speed of the F1 car. I also remember they said Rossi was special because his bpm stayed around 150 whereas the rest sat in the 180-190 range. Not because he was in a better shape, but because he had more in reserve. Hence he had more brain power and awareness to cope with the unexpected. Whether or not that's still the case, I cannot tell - this was commented on cirka 2003. BTW, a high bpm rate doesn't mean you are out of shape - max bpm is genetics more than anything. But even you could sit at max bpm for an hour of you were convinced you were going to get killed if your concentration lapsed for just a fraction of a second and you were already basically operating beyond your abilities.
  7. Don't have any video, but you can get similar results adding a quart of oil for old style automatic transmissions. Also helps to free stuck hydraulic lifters.
  8. Brno on the Yamaha 500 - yes, that was close to being a complete flipover
  9. Those are the best kind of crashes Colin Edwards had something similar some years back in MotoGP.
  10. It is very easy to understand that must have been a fantastic experience - good for you
  11. I have several moments that have stuck to mind that differ quite a bit. The ride home after picking up my brand new CB100 back in 1980. The sound, the look, the pride. Sliding the rear wheel of my CB1100F all the way around a loooong 100 mph sweeper. Riding a gnarly, hairpin-infested unfamiliar backroad on my VT500FT, raised for much more cornering clearance, and still touching down stands/exhaust in every corner. Touring on a beautiful day, no wind and not a cloud in sight, standing on the pegs, arms punching the sky, screaming from the top of my lungs inside my helmet from pure excitement of being alive, riding the XS500. Passing cars virtually every morning on snow and slick ice on my Z400G, riding on the normal tyres. Cruising on my VN800A and for the first time really enjoying the straights and seeing how nice the landscape was instead of thinking about when a corner would pop up. Trundling along on my VS1400, finding the road blocked by a huge tractor and being able to stop in time, knowing it would have been an accident with a sportier bike. When finally cracking the code of riding the way I've been told through this forum and by reading TOTT2 on my Z650B, and again being able to ride relaxed and intuitively. Yet the best moment of all came at the start of the 2015-season, when I finally lost all my urge to push and take risks on the road. Luckily, this coincided with a year when we experienced a huge amount of near-misses; roads blocked by vehicles, oncoming cars using our side of the road, cars not stopping for us at intersections - you name it, we got it. Due to the reduced speeds, we had no issues. But had this been some years earlier it would have ended with fatality at least 5 times and in hospital a dozen more times. Looking forward to many more safe and fun riding seasons.
  12. If you want to google-translate from German, or read German, you can read it all here http://www.motorradonline.de/fahrtechnik-und-fahrsicherheitstrainings/alles-ueber-schraeglage-mit-motorraedern.706154.html For those who will not do that, here are a few facts: Slowest and fastest: Ducati Diavel, rider pushing bike down, bike lean 41 degrees, combined lean 38, corner speed 47 kph Marq Marques on his MotoGP bike, hanging off, bike lean 62 , combined lean 66, speed 78 kph Honda Fireblade, rider sitting straight, bike and combined lean 45, speed 55 kph Honda Fireblade, rider pushing bike down, bike lean 46, combined lean 43, speed 53 kph Honda Fireblade, rider hanging off, bike lean 48, combined 51, speed 61 kph Honda FIreblade, Pirelli SBK Qualifier, hanging off, bike 51, combined 53, speed 65 kph Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, rider pushing bike down, bike lean 57, combined 51, speed 62 kph Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, rider sitting straight, bike and combined lean 47, speed 57 kph Husqvarna 701 Supermoto, rider hanging off, bike lean 46, combined 51, speed 62 kph
  13. Fun

    Interesting to see how the 40hp single reels in larger bikes, despite the rider not being perfectly consistent'
  14. http://www.superbikeplanet.com/2015/Dec/151209mncs.htm
  15. Guintoli was champ in 2014 on an Aprilia.