shakabeemer

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Everything posted by shakabeemer

  1. My short take on this question is that "perfection of one's thinking can lead to great outcomes". An example of this is "I will stay on the bike, safely, during this race/event, be smooth, and in the lead at the end", in lieu of "oh expletive, I'm out of control and going to crash".
  2. Having started Catholic Racing Group on Facebook... <This post has been MOVED to a new thread in the Cornering section called "Beliefs and Riding">
  3. Its been a long and challenging road for me back to New Jersey Motorsports Park since my unfortunate incident in 2014, yet i succeeded and CSS deserves a lot of credit for sticking by me, even though I also had another bad per incident with Penguin Road Racing School. Ken Hill, Nic Ienatsh, Chris Peris, Kyle Wyman, Mark Schellenger and the rest of the Yamaha Champions Riding School class that I graduated from on May e helped me tremendously over come and identify my bad habits, and to help me start to create champions habits. California Superbike School is my birthplace as a racer, which I have yet to make come to full fruition, but without all of you, this would not be possible. Special thanks to chase, Hotfoot, Trevor, rainman, Tyler, Eirik, The Prairie Dogs, CSS in the UK, Dylan, and who else, but Keith Code, Ride well and ride safe!
  4. Hi Again Phil, Would you please contact me at 347-804-6952. Thanks, Jesus, I Trust In You!
  5. Hi Hugh, Sorry to hear of your difficulties. Things could get better and I hope they do. My wife and I have had many bitter discussions about motorcycles and racing. I have to concede that many of her concerns are correct. The emotional and financial tolls in this realm are heavy. My plans are also scaled back this year, but I'm cautiously optimistic that I can do three days on the racetrack including Limerock. The centerpiece of my effort is to do a day with Yamaha Champions School, first, on May 3rd, where I feel like I can learn a lot from Nick and his staff. I'll try to finish up with Penguin at Loudon and finally get my license. If I can stick in a a Tonys Track Day, I'll be happy, because my sponsor, Todd, at Heroic Racing Apparel, has told me that he really puts his riders above money. I also love that little racetrack at Thompson Speedway, in Northeastern CT. I had huge expenses on my bike due to an accident on the street, and upgrades, and I too, am spending this year trying to get on the plus side of the balance sheet. I may be able to do some more track marshalling which will help me learn, get safer, and pay my expenses. The money at NJMP is pretty good for this, and they always need marshalls. MotoAmerica last year taught me tremendously, and I think this is going to help me in the future. I was, of course, saddened by the passing of Glen Frey, because with him goes my dream of singing with the Eagles. His family and friends, and other band members are still there, so I have hopes left for a closer relationship. I may turn my focus a little more in this direction because of advancing age. I've had a nagging thought to quit motorcycling, and racing altogether, but I feel the sport has given me so much, that its undeniable that I should continue and overcome my fears. Having been a professional bicycle racer in the past, it is helping me with my fitness goals, and I have learned from Roadracing World and Motorcycle Technology, that rider fitness and mental acuity are supreme in this sport. The Long Island New England Sport Bike Meetup Group holds lots of possibilities, including an escorted fund raiser for the Suffolk County Police Athletic League, and the track days. We are also doing Sturgis this year. I'm amazed at how this Group has taken off. I thank God for all of this. Good luck with your job, as I know how increasing responsibilities can be a big challenge and very rewarding. Wishing you the very best, and look forward to hearing more from you, about your career. Thanks for asking about my plans.
  6. I finally followed through and started a racing blog since way back when Laura (Hotfoot) suggested so. Its like me, a little disjointed but, getting better all the time. Here's the link. I'll also post the link on my racing blog on this site. Thanks to everyone and have a great 2016 season! http://nicsmotorcyleracingblog.blogspot.com
  7. I cannot wait to see my first MotoGP. If all goes as planned, I will see the races at NJMP after a track day on 8/10/2015!
  8. Great news, I rode two-up with Eric Wood yesterday and had a wonderful experience in my third School including my ill fated ride with CSS in May a year ago. Things are changing for the better and I am now looking forward to getting my CCS license in less than two months. I have a fully prepared Ninja ZX-650 at my disposal for the next two years at Loudon and New Jersey Motorsports Park. My sponsorship package is coming together now and I can see my way clear for 2015. I hope to see some of you at NJMSP soon. Best Regards to everyone. P.S. I also met Scott Crago, drummer for the Eagles yesterday because he was the celebrity guest of ours, His twin brother, Jeff, is also a great guy and we became fast friends. Scott and I sang "Take It Easy" together captured on my iPhone. I'll have to put the link up to my You Tube Channel on Nic's Motorcycle Racing blog. Happy Days everyone!
  9. Nice going Hugh. I'm moving forward too and rode two-up with Eric Wood yesterday. Looking forward to meeting you. Nic
  10. Hugh, I will be more present for your racing career. Go Dogs!
  11. Watched your forks in action with interest in the video you posted on your racing blog. A light bulb went on and the thought was, "Oh yeah, that makes more sense now after digging into the book". A lot of the above is over my head for the time being, especially as I scramble to absorb everything I learned at Penguin 6/9/15. However, I'm determined, and I'm going to learn enough to get my suspension set properly and change it as needs change. Thanks again for opening my eyes with Andrew's book, your book, and and your writing, I will continue to follow your blog. Go Dogs!
  12. I agree 100% that staying off your rear brake is the way to go except for the circumstances noted. The point I'm trying to make is what are you going to do when your back tire locks up in a panic stop? Believe me, you are in trouble. That was one of the main contributing causes of a nasty crash I had during a CSS Level I School. It also caused me to get squirrelly a couple of times before but not enough to make me give up my stubborn and foolish attachment to the rear brake. I knew the teaching on this but I chose to ignore it and it bit me hard.
  13. Thank you for all your help. Now is the time for me to put it to the test as I get ready for my school at Penguin. The biggest thing for me is to relax and enjoy. Really, thanks for your help and sticking by me though thick and thin Laura. Thanks to everyone for all the help you gave me to get me here to my little plateau. Good luck Hugh. I look forward to reading more about your career and exploits. BTW, the book on suspension is gorgeous. I can't wait to get into it. It already has me thinking in the right direction. I've come to the point of being able to give feedback to the pit crew at my school about suspension. That's a big part of the suspension game, i.e., know what you have at your disposal, and that's a lot!
  14. This will vary based on the rules of the organization or club you are racing with. If your seriously considering club racing you should download a copy of the rule book for the club / org you are going to compete with and read it front to back 3 or 4 times Thanks T, I appreciate the information.
  15. This *really* depends on the person. Honestly, "getting into the motor" isn't the most important thing for racing. Most novice racers change the pipe and maybe the intake, get a fuel map made, and maybe add a quickshifter. Or just run the motor totally stock... What really makes the difference is learning about chassis tuning - brakes to some extent, but even more so suspension, ride height etc. This is where racers really differ. Some will take the bike to a professional suspension tuner, have them set it up, then never touch an adjuster again all season. To me, that's crazy. I have done more reading about suspension tuning than any other motorcycle-related topic, and I am always making adjustments and, in the off-season, even hardware changes (springs, valves). At the very least a rider should be comfortable monitoring travel and adding or removing preload. Experimenting with ride height and attitude (either directly or via preload changes) can also be really useful. I am actually always a bit surprised how little understanding many riders have about suspension adjustment. Check out Andrew Trevitt's book on Sportbike Suspension Tuning as an excellent starting point. Thanks Hugh, I ordered the book.
  16. Thanks so much! I'm starting to get excited about that first race in the fall. I hardly know what to expect but I know its going to be exciting and exhilarating. I also have some healthy fear. Additionally, I'm really glad you encouraged me to do the blog. I just need to start writing and send you all the link. I'm going save the rest of my comments for the blog. I did, however, want to offer up my gratitude to you again for being such a great example in racing, as a coach, and a moderator for everyone. One question (a little off topic, but I'm pretty sure Hugh will be interested and not mind) that I have for you is what do you think is holding back women in racing and getting to the GP level? I know there is always still the glass ceiling in most professions, and also, especially in the more distant past, a sheer lack of interest. What do you think? Thanks! Thank you for your kind words, I really enjoy coaching and helping out with the forum, the more questions the better! It's tough to answer the question about what is holding women back; especially since I am one of the ones that IS out there racing. I can tell you two things that keep me from trying to advance farther - one is age, I started riding in my late thirties, and the other is finances - racing is expensive and I can earn a lot more money doing other things. Plus there isn't much job security for a racer - if you get hurt and can't ride, you're out of a job! I think racing is more appealing to boys than girls overall, just because boys are boys - motorcycles are cool, racing is cool, great way to impress women, plus it is daring and competitive and dangerous and I think all those things appeal to men more than women. It's not the easiest sport for a young girl to get into; parents tend not to want their little princesses risking their necks, plus the bikes are tall and tend to be a bit heavy for ladies, women's gear is hard to find, and the racetrack environment is not terribly female friendly. You definitely have to be willing to be in a man's world - with sweat and grease and bad language - and you can't expect to be coddled, you better be able to pull your own weight, and that can be intimidating. I do notice that in motorcycles (as in most areas) the people who are the MOST competent also tend to be the most open-minded and welcoming. The owners and coaches at CSS, for example, have always been extremely supportive and they made me feel very welcome from my very first day on a racetrack; that is a huge reason why I got into it and kept at it. Thanks Laura, I appreciate you taking the time to explain all of the things that go into making this kind of decision. A fair amount of it applies to men as well and will help me make my decisions about racing going forward. Being a track enthusiast is one thing and racing is entirely another!
  17. Thanks so much! I'm starting to get excited about that first race in the fall. I hardly know what to expect but I know its going to be exciting and exhilarating. I also have some healthy fear. Additionally, I'm really glad you encouraged me to do the blog. I just need to start writing and send you all the link. I'm going save the rest of my comments for the blog. I did, however, want to offer up my gratitude to you again for being such a great example in racing, as a coach, and a moderator for everyone. One question (a little off topic, but I'm pretty sure Hugh will be interested and not mind) that I have for you is what do you think is holding back women in racing and getting to the GP level? I know there is always still the glass ceiling in most professions, and also, especially in the more distant past, a sheer lack of interest. What do you think? Thanks!
  18. R, Thanks for the info on Roebling. Only a true trackie could know that...Ha! I'm trying to convince my wife to move to Atlanta but, even for myself, I'd like to be in some place warmer for my final days...like L.A. but that's 100% my choice and my wife's not. It looks like Florida is the way to go. Now, I'll have to look for a sleepy little track somewhere in the back hills of Central Florida. Transplanting a Long-Guy-Landman to there is quite a trick. I'm going to have to broaden my horizons. Peace out Brother!
  19. When perusing the link for the event I noticed, for the first time, the date, which makes it possible for me to be there. But alas once again, its just way to far for me to go but, maybe, you and Nate will come up here to my neck of the woods sometime. That would be cool!
  20. Wow, I would love to go to that! But alas, for one thing, I've been waiting two weeks for my tire which is on backorder, so even if I was cavalier enough to head down there, I couldn't. Thanks for the heads-up, it sounds like a nice event. Id' really would like to meet you and Nate. Maybe next time.
  21. Hi Hugh, Thanks for asking. I have plans to go to Penquin Racing School on June 9th up at Thompson Raceway in Connecticut. Its an old Nascar track, like 75 years old, that was recently repaved and it has plenty of good corners and a very long front straight. Its the closest track for me and only requires an hour and fifteen minute ferry ride and a two hour bike ride from there. Then I will go again in August and if all goes well I will get my racing license and do my first race at the end of the year up in Loudon NH. After that there's a good chance I'll be back at CSS to do a 2 day camp in 2016. I also have an eye on the Absolute program where you pay about $1500.00 by November for the following season and get up to about 20 track days at NJMP. I'm finally getting my Blog going and I will post the link in the forums here. I'm glad you were able to get your wife's consent as this has been a real rough go for me too. It certainly has given me pause for thought as her arguments are not without merit. I mean I have responsibilities that I have to honor and they would be affected if I had a problem, so I will have to keep that in mind. I can't go out there to win at all costs which is ok for me because that attitude can be a recipe for disaster. I think I will take a more relaxed approach and have a good time. Eric Wood is suggesting I use a 600 to learn on and that's also ok with me as I don't want to risk my S1000RR. I'll be able to rent one of Penguin's bikes with insurance for the race. I weigh about 189 right now and I guess that's a lot for a supersport bike but, again, I'm just out there to learn and have a good time. I can think about getting more serious in '16. That's it for now. I'm always interested in what you have to say. Thanks!
  22. I had a serious crash last year about this time and the fear was so strong that I thought about selling my bike. Then I talked it over with a close buddy who I ride with and he suggested I don't. It was so obvious to him that I had a serious love for riding. Then my wife, who is not fond of my riding, said I should stay with it for the same reason. That was a year ago and I although I have increased respect and for riding, I don't think about the crash in the same way. It was just a learning experience.
  23. Thanks so much Keith!