rchase

Scraping Parts

16 posts in this topic

I was searching for some installation videos for a Belly pan for my S1000RR. Ran into this gem that's a classic.

 

The rider of this Z1000 was scraping his belly pan on the road during a corner. What mistake did the rider make that reduced his ground clearance?

 

 

 

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A hint. This mistake is better heard than seen. :)

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No throttle roll on, reduces cornering clearance

 

however, its highly unlikely that was the belly pan scraping, more likely a peg feeler, or as its the left side of the bike possibly the kickstand, I'm pretty sure you'd end up dragging the case cover before you managed to scrape the "belly pan" on that bike

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Exactly! No throttle roll on.

 

Now that look at the video again with Stroker's comment the lazy turning certainly did not really help the ground clearance situation.

 

I have seen a few Youtube videos of throttle control errors some involving crashes but this one was almost "textbook" and I wanted to share. Plus nobody got hurt.

 

I agree on the peg as well but I just went with what the video said since I was not around to look for scrape marks. :)

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You know, I don't think the camera is on quite straight which makes the lean angle look like more than it is, but still he (she?) has the bike WAYYY heeled over when the touch down occurs, yet body position is just a normal street riding "Ianetsch pace" kind of setup. If you are going to carry that kind of corner speed I think you need to get off the bike a bit more, or at least get your upper body weight more to the inside. And maybe get the knee out so you know where you are.

 

Weird stuff happens when you try to go fast without sufficiently aggressive body position. Last race round I got on the endurance bike and for whatever reason in one of the early corners I just didn't adopt my normal cornering position. I really wasn't going fast at all but ended up giving myself a start when my boot / peg scraped the tarmac, but not my knee.

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Here's a man who believed there were no benefits to be gained from hanging off, who often bled from his toes after wearing through his boots over a race. Especially the 8:20-8:40 mark and 10:50 to 11:20 if you find it hard to watch it all.

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Neat video Eriik!

 

You can see how much more lean angle he has to use vs the other riders at the same speed. You do have to admire his dedication to riding the way he was most comfortable regardless of the cost involved.

 

On the body position topic. The first time I took CSS I was too concerned with upsetting the bike to hang off at all. As my speed increased I felt the cornering forces "pulling on me" to such a degree I eventually started moving my upper body to the inside of the turn. When I eventually became more comfortable in hanging off a lot of those cornering forces were nearly gone. The lean bike was instrumental in demonstrating to me that the bike was not really as bothered as I thought it would be with me moving around. It also helped me learn the correct technique in real time with the coach providing feedback.

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Amazing what he could do with such an obvious power disadvantage on the long straight.

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rchase, I honestly cannot see that he use more lean. In fact, to me it looks like the chap on the Kawasaki leans the bike more despite hanging off and going slower. Hailwood corner a lot faster than the Kawa rider, so if he leans more - which, as mentioned, I fail to see as a common theme for the race - it could just as well be down to the extra speed. Or?

 

The Kawa had a lot more power, though, as YellowDuck noticed. To me, the win is similar to taking a customer Honda and win a MotoGP race today.

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Eirik,

 

Perhaps I got him mixed up with another bike. Old video and all. I also fast forwarded to the times you specified so that makes it even more possible. :)

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Looks good rchase.. -- Greg from STT forum. I finally made it on the forum. Going to CSSS Sept 15 at Willow.. Studying up now..

 

AH HA! I'm glad they finally got you sorted.

 

For those scratching their heads Greg is a really nice guy that I bumped into through my track day group's forums. I had commented on the forums here and the positivity found here. He's an S1000RR rider and is going to be doing a CSS very soon. Judging by the video he sent me after he gets through the program he's going to be SCARY fast as he know's his way around the BMW's power band. :)

 

Welcome to the forum Greg! If you haven't already put up a post introducing yourself.

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Id say the remainder % that led to scrapping of the parts might be not using the 2 step for choosing a turn in entry (too early entry) + no quick flip

Or maybe hes just too heavy for the Z1000 in stock form.

Anyone with more than 170 pounds fully geared up on the Z1000 already has reduced clearance from the get go imho

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I'm just trying to catch up on this forum, saw this topic and it took my interest...

 

Some questions - is no throttle roll-on the real reason for dragging parts here? Does correct throttle usage have anything to do with applying throttle at a particular part of a turn? What would have happened if he started to roll-on the throttle before he scraped, in order to try and prevent the bike from scraping? At that stage wasn't lean angle still increasing? ;)

 

Let me know your thoughts...

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