PittsDriver

Video Critiquing

32 posts in this topic

It's not the speed down the straight that worries me at all. It's the hairpin turn at the end of it. The Advanced group guys riding liter class race bikes are keeping it pinned to the first marker and seeing high 150's at this track. But then, they're threshold braking and feel like they're ice skating all the way until they've tipped the bike for the turn. I'll have to take their word for it for now. I could see myself getting there again but I'd want to sneak up on it a bit at a time. Way back in the 70's we weren't seeing these kinds of speeds anywhere - my GS550E topped out around 120 mph and my GS1000 was about 140 but took a while to get there. I never saw that on the track. First time back out in decades for me and I'm feeling the DTC spoil the wheelies all the way up to 140 mph when I get off the juice. Dang! This is fun :D

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Funny story - I asked Jeremy Cook (AMA Pro) where his braking marker was and his reply was a two-count after the guy he's passing.

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Sitting on 400 lbs of metal getting pushed through the atmosphere at over 100 mph just seems a tad unnatural...

 

Just had to reply to this - you're right it seems a unnatural because it is completely unnatural! And that's why anyone who is riding by instinct/intuition/"natural ability" is doing something wrong... By definition it's not possible to correctly undertake an unnatural activity by using our natural instincts, which just goes to show how important training is!

 

 

Funny story - I asked Jeremy Cook (AMA Pro) where his braking marker was and his reply was a two-count after the guy he's passing.

Haha, I think he was playing it up for you. :lol:
I wonder if that still applies when the rider he's passing missed his own brake marker and carried an extra 20km/h into the corner and is about to run off the track? :rolleyes:

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Why the short-shifting? I know the S1kRR is a beast, but having tried one, even in full superbike tune, I found that it actually is less beasty when rev'ed out and you can avoid an upshift and resulting downshift on almost every straight.

And as others have said, less time spend enginebraking/coasting and nail them apexes.

 

But very stable and secure riding, a joy to watch

 

Ronni

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Why the short-shifting? I know the S1kRR is a beast, but having tried one, even in full superbike tune, I found that it actually is less beasty when rev'ed out and you can avoid an upshift and resulting downshift on almost every straight.

And as others have said, less time spend enginebraking/coasting and nail them apexes.

 

But very stable and secure riding, a joy to watch

 

Ronni

 

Thanks for the kind words Ronni. Other than level 1/2 CSS camp in the spring, that was the first time on the track for me in about 30+ years. I'm clearly a work in progress and open to any and all critiquing! :)

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We all are, that is the beauty of riding.

 

And given that you are very secure in your riding and seem to know what you want from it (have fun and still be able to go to work on monday), you have a very good base to start from.

 

Reference points helps to keep you consistent and safe on track, and together with throttle control are the main factors in going fast (for me). RPs can help with the apexes, so that nail them time after time. RPs put your mind at ease in the braking zone, because you know that you will be able to make the turn. Personally I have two RPs for braking, one for brakes on, and one of brakes off,

I first adjust the brake on point, then the brake off, and if I feel like going faster into the turn (which I know if the apex is easily reached and I have lean to spare) I simply move my brake off RP a little closer to the brake on RP.

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Sorry I'm so late to the party, but I'm studying so much I don't have time to come to the site much.

 

Putting the camera up front limits the appropriate feedback we can give. The main thing that was mentioned above is your turning. If I remember correctly, one person said you should change your turn points and learn to turn faster. If you learn to turn faster in the appropriate corners, that will correct your blowing the apex on so many corners, thus negating your need to change your turn points. That'd be my first suggestion. If you're steering as fast as you believe you can, then changing your turn points would be the best option for your level of riding. Either one will allow you to get the bike back up and get back on the throttle faster.

 

This leads into picking the bike up. The pick-up drill would be something I'd recommend you work on. I could be wrong, but judging by the video, you seem to be allowing the bike to pick itself back up. Seconds could be shaved in improving this skill.

 

Improving on that, it is what it is with you being in the beginner group. You could take advantage of this and work on squaring off the corners in order to get that drive coming out of the corners (in this case to pass other riders). I'm 240 lb on an under-maintained 10 year old 600cc bike. When bumping down to the intermediate group to coach friends and want to open the throttle up before the end of the session, I have to do it all the time to keep in front of, or keep up with the other bikes so I can stay close to them on the straights and by them on the brakes. It's a great skill, and it will help you improve on the pick-up aspect of corner exit.

 

From there we go to your braking. You need to do it later. You get your braking done quickly, then seemingly coast to the corner. Picking your favorite corner and pushing your brake markers slowly will make a huge difference in your time. Then add another corner, then another.

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