Spaghetti

Tires Temperature Onboard Sensors

15 posts in this topic

I've seen a few infrared onboard sensors online. Has anyone installed them on their bike?

Since tires temperature is so critical to riding why hasn't the technology evolved more quickly? Priority-wise, I would compare these sensors to tire warmers or traction control.

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I've seen a few infrared onboard sensors online. Has anyone installed them on their bike?

Since tires temperature is so critical to riding why hasn't the technology evolved more quickly? Priority-wise, I would compare these sensors to tire warmers or traction control.

 

How would you use the information from the temperature sensors? you might be able to integrate the information into the TC, but it still couldn't compensate for track surface/adhesion.

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Me and a friend of mine are using IR sensors on the bike. We are also using them on the brakes and tires in the track (I only use them for brake discs). We also use telemetry to record the IR sensors and many other parameters like suspension travel, GPS, engine etc. The info from the IR sensors can be used to see how tire compound works in the specific track and conditions.

Well he is a bit crazy with the sensors. In his new bike GSXR 1000 2017 he will install three IR sensors on each tire :blink: , oil pressures, suspension pots, IR temps for brake discs and calipers and sooo many others that I cannot even remember.

Here is a video of him in Misano with some of the sensors showing

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I've seen the gear indicator occasionally goto 7th Gear- :). What is the video software he's using? Some pretty sophisticated stuff to integrate all of that data. I'm assuming this isn't his K17 bike, as it indicates it was taken Dec 2015.

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I've seen the gear indicator occasionally goto 7th Gear- :). What is the video software he's using? Some pretty sophisticated stuff to integrate all of that data. I'm assuming this isn't his K17 bike, as it indicates it was taken Dec 2015.

 

Looks like Dashware to me.

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Haven't looked into this at all, but I'm assuming the IR readers measure the outside temp, correct? Any links to enlighten us on this?

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The sensors measure surface temp of the tire, here is a very affordable system:

 

http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/driven-racing-mantis-tire-temp-sensor#overview_tab

 

and a little description on installing it from Dave Moss tuning:

http://feelthetrack.com/testing-program/tire-testing/drivens-mantis-ir-sensor-technology/

 

It isn't terribly expensive (cheaper than a decent set of warmers... or tires, for that matter...) and I could see how it might be useful. Surface temp isn't the whole story but seeing the temps change while sitting on a starting line on a cool day could be educational, and finding out whether your tires are getting colder or hotter AS YOU RIDE on a cold windy or wet day might be very helpful. Certainly the info would get more useful as you got used to it and had some baseline info from your own experience to compare to. It might even help you catch a tire pressure or suspension setup problem, or prevent cold-tear on race tires - the system could pay for itself in one day if it prevented you from ruining a $400-$600 set of race tires in just a few laps.

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The software is made from AIM and it integrates the data from the telemetry to the video that has been recorded with AIM camera. The sensors are made from Texsense and cost 200euro each. He will use 3 on each wheel (2 sides, 1 center). I have 2D IR sensor for the front discs. For the IR sensors he will use at least 8 (6 tires and 2 for rotors). He might exaggerate a bit but the truth is that if someone is serious about the racetrack then he will need the right tools to help him avoid unfortunate situations.

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Can you post up some of the temps that you have seen/get on the tires? (ideally include what the ballpark riding conditions were at the time: bike, outside temp, etc.)

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Looking at the video I noticed that the side wall temperature increases only marginally when riding the straights at high speed. For some reason I thought hard acceleration and braking was going to warm up the full tire.

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Very glad you noticed that and brought it up.

 

Here is what he have learned/found out: aside from tire warmers (that are not an option for the coaching staff to use on a school day) tires warm from the inside out, by flexing the carcass. One needs to warm both sides of the tire by cornering (gently at first) then gradually going faster. As one gets familiar with this, and with good basic riding technique, one can feel the tires grip more and then just keep increasing speed gradiently.

 

But...must warm both sides of the tires. Quite literally we have had students ride of out of pit lane, where turn 1 and 2 are right handers. Then go down to turn 3 a little faster than leaving T-2, and crash!

 

It's something the coaches have to pay close attention to, as we come in/go out often.

 

CF

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Can you post up some of the temps that you have seen/get on the tires? (ideally include what the ballpark riding conditions were at the time: bike, outside temp, etc.)

The ambient temperature in the video was 32C I think. The bike was on warmers but some time passed since they begin the session.

The side of the tires get some heat while you turn and specially in the exit of the corner since it does not have contact with the tarmac in the straight line. The surface temperature is not the hole story but you can have some data and make some changes. Even in MOTOGP or tire development they use the same method.

I include some photo of SBK and MotoGP and the last 2 are from my friend GSXR 1000K7 with 3 IR sensors.

post-3845-0-16508600-1484036732_thumb.jpg

post-3845-0-76132300-1484036748_thumb.jpg

post-3845-0-35946200-1484037109_thumb.jpg

post-3845-0-52440000-1484037119_thumb.jpg

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Thank you all, these were very valuable information for me.

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But...must warm both sides of the tires. Quite literally we have had students ride of out of pit lane, where turn 1 and 2 are right handers. Then go down to turn 3 a little faster than leaving T-2, and crash!

 

The MotoGP riders can nod to that in unison. Sachsenring is infamous for that problem, due to having no less than 7 left-hand corners in a row, then followed by a downhill right-hand corner (T11, the "Waterfall" corner).

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DR, thanks for putting those pictures up, good to see those.

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