Spaghetti

After-market throttle cables

13 posts in this topic

I'm wondering why there is only one major producer of after-market throttle cables. Their flagship product is a progressive cable that runs exponentially faster as you open the throttle: at lower speed the sensitivity is almost the same than the stock cable but as you open gas the cable will run faster towards its end. In general, throttle control is more critical at lower speeds (there could be tracks with very fast corners that require the same level of throttle control than slower corners, but I am not aware of any. Please let me know). Ride-by-wire changed a bit the need for this type of upgrade but did not remove the problem (long discussion).

But this product doesn't do just that. It also has a smoother, more stable run (hard to describe with words) and removes that dead "play" at the begin of stock cables (I know it can be reduced but not removed).

With all the stress on traction control why there would be only one fine offer? I give this upgrade more points than rear-sets and master cylinders, yet everybody jumps on rearset and brakes upgrades but not on a precision throttle cable?

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Hadn't run in to this yet...I for sure do run my cable play at virtually zero.

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I've heard of throttle cams with profiles that bump the throttle at mid-high ends, but not cables.  Please elaborate on this product and how it's helped your riding.

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This is the product: https://www.motionpro.com/featured/rev2_throttle

 

Street/Road Race Kit (RR Cam)
  • Sportbike oriented cam profile reel for the Rev2™ Throttle
  • Profile acts like a slow throttle to 40% opening, them progressively changes to fast profile from 70% to 100% throttle
  • Allows rider greater control at lower throttle openings, but acts like racing throttle at higher throttle openings
  • Good for all levels of riders, experts will appreciate the greater control at the limit, less experienced riders will like the smooth on/off throttle feeling

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Looks like a well made part.   I can also see how it could work very well if it's tailored to a specific track where you have known throttle % for mid-exit, you could pre-plan by installing a cam for your quickest corner to put the cam bump right at or after the apex.

And I can clearly understand why you'd want to reduce throw (eg 1/4 turn to 1/3 turn) however its seems counter to good throttle control in observation of TC rule #1 to aggressively bump throw at 70+% opening. 

Seems like something beneficial for people who are above my current ability.

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Quick turn throttles have an advantage if they fit your use case.  They reduce the amount of rotation the throttle requires to get to wide open.  They of course have their place depending on what you want to do and the stock throttle your bike has.  If you are racing not having to re-position your hand while opening the throttle is an advantage and saves you some effort. 

Would I want this on my 200+hp S1000RR track bike?  Heck No!  I'm more than happy to re-position my hand if I have to just to have some extra travel to manage the power. My bike has the BMW HP ECU as well and I swear there's a micro switch in the throttle that launches the front tire off the ground when you get to 60% throttle. If I rode a 600 or a 250 I might find this to be an advantage since I tend to be more gentle than I need to on the gas.  

Possibly one of the most annoying throttles in the known universe can be found on many early MV Agusta F4's.  it's silky smooth and makes rev matched downshifting absolutely effortless.  It has a super nice ratio to it that allows you to manage the power easily yet turn it quickly.  The problem comes in the lower end of when the throttle cracks open.  The springs they used on the throttle bodies are way too stiff so you go from about 0% power to about 5-10% power causing the bike to lurch when you don't want it to.  Removing a throttle body spring helps (there are two) but the "jerk" remains if you aren't absolutely perfect with your input.  I think they even realized it sucked because they put a little control that allows you to raise the idle off the stop on the handle bar.  It's a fuel injected bike so there's no real need for the control other than to get you out of the "twitchy" range of the throttle.  Ah those crazy Italians. Gotta love em! :)

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Rob, did you try the rev2? There are multiple options, if you don't want to use the progressive wheel you can mount the linear one. For the cost it's one of my favorite upgrades. It changed my riding experience greatly.

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I have on my 2015 GSX-R1000 and my son has on his 2015 GSX-R750 a quick throttle tube by G2.  I did more as I have smaller hands and found it easier to get full throttle.  It did not make the bike (to me) any more difficult to ride or make throttle overly abrupt; plus worked with stock housing and cables.  Its not exactly cheap but fit and finish (and function) is superb.  Both our bikes have reflashed ECU's and to me the G2 just added to the response of the bikes.

G2 Ergo Throttle tube.

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Interesting, I've never really felt the need for this sort of thing or a "quick throttle". I think lots of guys swap the R6 throttle onto Gixxers but I've never had a problem that I felt I needed to fix. 

I do have to wonder how it would affect high-RPM rear wheel slides if you have less throttle range to manage that with... :huh: That has always been the one big turn off for me.

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I put one on my ZX6R and really liked it. My reason for doing it was range of motion, the stock throttle turned so far, that to get it pinned that I had to re-position my hand in the middle of the roll on OR start out with my hand in a weird forward position to get enough travel to get from full-off to full-on. For street it was a total non-issue but for track riding it was a pain, so I switched to a throttle with a shorter travel and it worked great. I did not find it overly sensitive and easily adjusted to it. It really didn't seem much more "quick" than the stock one, I had no trouble with that at all.

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Hhmmm... maybe it's just something you get used to, seeing as there are so many different throttle ratios on different bikes anyway.

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15 hours ago, Hotfoot said:

I put one on my ZX6R and really liked it. My reason for doing it was range of motion, the stock throttle turned so far, that to get it pinned that I had to re-position my hand in the middle of the roll on OR start out with my hand in a weird forward position to get enough travel to get from full-off to full-on.

Exactly the same for me on my R6. Even though I have a DIY quick-throttle I still wish I had a shorter throw on the trackbike.

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Thing is that, at least on my bike (Yamaha R1, cannot talk for sure about others), the impact of turning your throttle on the opening of the system is not equivalent depending from where to where it goes. More specifically, the first degrees don't have the same effect that the last ones. It is not linear. So a fast throttle does not have to make the bike more difficult to manage. For instance, my bike (1000 cc) at the moment has huge power (215 cv at the crank) and huge torque (>13). And the fast throttle is very very precise to manage...because it is not much different than the normal throttle at the beginning (so it's not like you don't manage the power well initially, it's almost normal), but then when you get WOT, so in the last part of the rotation, that's where I need to turn it much less than the normal throttle. But then, that's where the power differential is less important, so this is super easy to manage. And I really appreciate not having to reposition my hand..actually I find that having to reposition my hand rather makes me do some "parasite" moves on the throttle, which destabilise the bike more. My 2 cents.

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