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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/19/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    When you start wheelying some of your power is lifting the front wheel, instead of being translated into forward motion (speed). So if you are interested in lap times, you want all of the power you are requesting with the throttle to go into forward motion when exiting a corner rather than lifting the front wheel. If you are also interested in enjoying yourself you don't mind the wheelies coz they are great fun The most obvious demonstration of this wasted power is race starts where a rider who wheelies immediately loses tenths to those who are not. From my own experience, the time lost when doing some wheelies on corner exit is negligible and you can ride it out with the front wheel at a consistent height off the ground until the next gear change, which often puts the front wheel back down. One thing to note is that it's easy to have the front wheel turned when it touches down again if you wheelie while leaned over. There are few things more satisfying than wheelying out of a corner while leaned over, touching down with the front wheel turned slightly, but keeping it pinned, relaxing your arms on the bars and riding it out without having a massive tank slapper. On the dirt bike you can even do this while the rear wheel is spinning and roosting the rider behind you. Especially if that rider is your mate with whom you've been having a roosting war for years
  2. 1 point
    We care the most about inducing the 40/60 weight distribution via throttle control when we need maximum performance from the tires and the suspension, when cornering on asphalt as fast as possible. If, while cornering like that, we put more weight on one tire, we compress that suspension and load that tire beyond the optimum state or conditions. The suspension becomes harder, the contact patch becomes a little bigger and the profile of the tire less pliable. Following the irregularities of the pavement is more difficult for the tire. The rubber becomes less elastic and it changes its shape more slowly. Once the weight carried by that tire while cornering hard reaches a crtical point, the available traction that the over-loaded tire can offer rapidly decreases. During a leaned wheelie, all the weight of the bike and the rider is on the rear tire and on the rear suspension. That tire would not be able to develop the traction demanded by the lateral forces of extreme cornering, which normally surpass the value of that weight. The wheelie always happens during the way out of the corner and at a lean angle that is much smaller than the max lean angle required by that turn. If the rider tries to wheelie the bike at that max lean angle, when the lateral forces of cornering on the contact patch are close to the max, the tire would slide. The tire would not slide only if the rear contact patch has been unloaded enough from lateral forces in a way that its performance can be reduced by the the extra weight.
  3. 1 point
    That term can get misunderstood, as it has different definitions. One is simply the high point of an arc. As used in riding...the closest point. One could also call it "his" or "her" apex.
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