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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/11/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Speaking of timing... something else to take a look at is exactly WHEN you crack the throttle on. If a rider is running a little bit wide a little before the apex (not able to make it to the desired apex) what could that tell you about the rider's throttle timing? Next time you ride pay attention to when the throttle comes on - is the bike on its line (fully leaned and pointed in the direction you want it to go) before you start to roll on the gas?
  2. 2 points
    Yesterday I received in my email, a Keith Code article, Speed and Direction and I think the article struck a chord with regard to what I’m trying to solve. The article isn’t yet posted in the articles section, so it must be new. From it, this particular section seemed relevant and as I slept overnight I awoke with a different idea on how it applies to my current barrier ”Any rider's true skill level can only be measured by his ability to determine exactly WHERE to change or maintain speed and direction and execute the right AMOUNT of each. There are no other components to skill.“
  3. 1 point
    It could be that you are not following two fundamental rules of cornering: 1) Looking deep into the turn: You can only know that your trajectory is one foot off if you are looking close in front of your bike. 2) One steering for the whole turn: You may be adjusting your steering along the turn in order to achieve your goal trajectory. Think of the unintended consequences that you are creating if you are doing so, like diversion of attention, disorientation, over-stressing the front tire, etc. The way I visualize cornering trajectory: to me it is like shooting a ball into the basketball hood from a distance, you feel the cross-wind, you estimate the distance and the angle, you gut-calculate the whole flight of the ball and then you impart your best directed push hoping for the best. Sometimes you miss for little and sometimes you nail it. The hard mental, visual and calculation work in cornering happens prior the turn-in point, which is equivalent to the moment of actually pushing the ball. Let the bike "fly" describing that natural arc, free of unnecessary minute steering inputs and lean angle adjustments. Missing an apex for 12 inches may add a few feet to the corner's total trajectory, which is not a big difference for a bike that moves 88 feet per second (60 mph). Distracting your attention from proper throttle control and from reference points and from spatial location may slow your bike much more.
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