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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/08/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Sometimes, a rider is a perfect match for a bike, like Stoner on the Ducati. Doesn't mean the bike is particularly good, but that the combination is. That seems to be the case with the current Kawasaki, where Rea perhaps is able to use the extra torque that comes with a lower rev limit to good effect, whereas the others may struggle to get the bike to hook up and get drive. Just speculating, but there obviously he has found strengths with the bike others cannot utilize. You see the same thing with Honda in MotoGP, where only MM is consistently winning and taking podiums; it could be that that bike also is very difficult to master, but if you have that extra bit of talent - natural or learned - it may be possible to explore terrain restricted to "lesser" individuals.
  2. 1 point
    I cannot fathom how he stomps over everyone else. He manages to nearly holeshot every start and from there he charges forward like a raging bull. Then, he hardly makes mistakes either. Apparently there’s a formula for recognizing talent. As a Honda fan, I’m pretty teed off that Ten Kate couldn’t keep him. But he wouldn’t have had the success on such a lackluster machine- but I’m not sure if it’s the bike or the rider looking at the other Kwak riders in the WSBK field.
  3. 1 point
  4. 1 point
    MaxMcAllister in his suspension clinic (can be found on YouTube) provides the info that all geometry changes have a side effect for every intended effect. He said it’s about 3:1 ratio of effect to side effect and many people chase setup issues because of missing information of knowing which end of the motorcycle to change. The cliff notes: he provides that front end changes effect corner entry to mid turn and rear end height changes effect mid turn to corner exit; being mindful of the side effect issue. My concern with prescribing a geometry change at this point is introducing another variable into the equation when rider input, vision, timing and throttle control haven’t been sorted, nor do we know if static sag and chassis balance have been baselined. My $.03 is aligned with the OP and Hotfoot’s process to establish what the rider is doing and how the bike is responding.
  5. 1 point
    Most likely the coach at the track day was trying to help riders avoid the common error of braking (which compresses the forks) then releasing the brakes (which allows them to extend again) then turning the bike (which compresses them again). This bouncing up and down is, as you can imagine, counterproductive to accurate and predictable steering. In a simple corner the ideal scene is to be coming off the brakes as you are turning the bike, so the forces transfer from the deceleration forces to the cornering forces and keep the forks compressed instead of popping up and back down again. As far as telling you how exactly how much effect that is going to have, it is not realistic to think anyone can do that for you, there are far too many variables (suspension setup, rider and bike weight, braking style, steering input rate, surface traction, shape of turn, and so forth). You will have to experiment with it yourself, on your own bike and observe it. Almost certainly YES you can improve it with riding technique (have you been to school and had the Hook Turn material yet? Or the slow brake release classroom session?), unless your front suspension is extremely stiff in compression or has rebound damping set excessively low. Definitely you can sharpen up the steering on a bike by lowering the front a bit, but if taken too far this can compromise stability and you can get headshake, or twitchiness in the steering. Not sure the GSXR750 would need much changing on geometry, though, my impression of those were that they had nice handling. In the specific turns you describe (T1 and T3), are you trying to turn the bike while still on the gas? For sure that will make it harder to steer. Are you ABLE to steer it now and just noticing the amount of effort required, or are you running wider than you want in those turns?
  6. 1 point
    The farther you get away for an object's center of mass, the more leverage you have. So lower bars would have less leverage. Also have a look at Newton's third law of motion and then decide what you mean by "load" and possibly rephrase.
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