Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/19/2019 in Posts

  1. 3 points
    In this article, Keith describes what HE needs to do, to make riding improvements, this article has been pivotal for me in my riding. I carry a copy of it with me to every track day or school. I went to the Articles section to look for the link to it and noted there are several other articles about Rider Improvement or Isolating Barriers, etc. a look through the Articles section may help you find some of the answers you seek.
  2. 3 points
    Like most any physically demanding sport, physical fitness (nutrition, hydration, strength, flexibility, etc.) is a factor in your ability to perform, and so are training, understanding, and practice. But, in my opinion, personalized coaching, and willingness to BE coached, are extremely important. I'll give you my perspective: I started riding quite late, in my mid thirties. I was very slow and very nervous and I don't think anyone expected me to have the potential to ride fast, let alone race (least of all me!), but I got really interested in the sport, got lots of coaching, and devoted a lot of time to really understanding the material, and my understanding of the material ABSOLUTELY changed and evolved as I rode faster. Going back and reading Twist II, I found lots of information struck me differently as my pace increased and I found techniques that were a bit vague to me at first became much more important, much more useful to me, because I NEEDED them more. For example, I could get away with slow body transitions at slower speeds but as my laptimes came down, speed of moving across the bike in a chicane became a limiting factor, I couldn't get through a particular section any quicker without moving over faster. Suddenly hip flick, which didn't seem very useful to me before, became a critical skill. That is just one example, but I have had, over the years, a BUNCH of breakthroughs like that, and have found that as I progress in my riding, becoming proficient in certain techniques and riding faster overall, new barriers crop up and as I address each one I get quicker again - and then encounter something else. How do I overcome the barriers? Through coming to school and getting coaching, mostly. Sometimes study of the material helps, sometimes analyzing data (laptimes, braking zones, lines, etc. from my lap timer or data logger) help, but coaching is what always makes the biggest difference - very often what I THOUGHT was my barrier turned out to be something different entirely, and it required the eye of a coach to discover that. Of course, my mindset while being coached is a huge factor in my ability to improve. If, for example, I came to school fiercely determined that I already knew "what my problem was", then I did not get nearly as much benefit from coaching because I was resistant to allowing the coach to help me. After I figured that out, I got even more improvements on my school days. I said physical fitness is important, but I am a lot older than many of the riders I race against, and not as fit as most of them, either, but my CSS training allows me to ride with fewer SR's and a lot less wasted effort so I can go faster and be calmer overall. I thought I had reached my riding peak years ago but I am actively racing this year and I am riding faster than ever before. I still get coaching as often as I can, generally I come to school as a student at least 4 days a year, if not more, and that makes a huge difference for me. It is not because I am in better shape, because I am not. It is because I understand and apply the riding tech better than I could before. I used to think, at the end of any school day as a student, that I was riding as fast as I ever would, because I figured I would just get older and slower.... but I'm not getting slower, I'm getting faster. Every time I come to school I get some new piece of information or tackle a new skill that adds something to my riding, and I get quicker. And what a thrill that is! And it is even better when some twenty year old comes over to your pit to ask you how you do it.
  3. 3 points
    I think visual skills are far more important than the others listed. I think your school thinks so too You teach that and throttle control first because it's the foundation of all the other skills in that those two things keep you mentally ahead of the action unfolding in front of you. The only other thing I would add as a skill is being smooth and steady on the controls. If your vision and throttle control are good, I think you'll find that those quick reflexes, bravery, and other skills will get tested less often!!
  4. 2 points
    I notice that it is very hard to get the actual character of the track from seeing it on TV. Hard to perceive the elevation changes, hard to see the changes in camber and surface, and the abrupt changes in camera perspective can make it hard to grasp the flow of the track. I also notice that I am amazed by how much the bikes slide around, and wiggle under hard braking, and how rough some riders can be on the controls while others are silky smooth. When I watch videos (especially on-board videos) of amateur racers I am amazed by how many errors some riders make in races. Riders that are fast, judging by their laptimes, but make a lot of mistakes; it would seem surprising that they don't fall down more often - but then sometimes I find out they DO fall often. It certainly seems possible to pick up some incorrect ideas or not-useful information, for example I sometimes hear announcers throw out some thoughtless comment or platitude that is really not applicable and could be confusing if you tried to really take it seriously. On the other hand, seems like you could learn a lot about preparation and race strategy, tire wear management, and race rules by watching races, by seeing what happens to riders that are late to the grid, or overwork their tires in the first part or a race, or choose the right or wrong tire compound, I find that stuff quite interesting.
  5. 2 points
    If you Google "front tire chicken strips Dave Moss" he has a short and rather entertaining video that relates to this topic. (Dave Moss is a very respected suspension guy and knows a LOT LOT LOT about tires and tire wear.)
  6. 2 points
    This is difficult as to a point these skills will play off each other. So, my opinion (based on street riding, not track though they are likely the same): #1 - Visual skill, lack of target fixation. You have to see the situation or threat before anything else can happen. #2 - Quick reflexes. Once you see the threat/issue you need to make the right reaction. #3 - Ability to steer quickly. If you need to change direction, this is important. #4 - Physical Condition. Its important so you can enjoy your ride and not be fatigued (and sloppy) #5 - A lowly last is Brave. Just being brave will likely get you in real trouble. One skill not mentioned is ability to brake safely and quickly in all riding attitudes (straight up, turning, poor traction etc).
  7. 2 points
    Another skill for street riders would be developing your spidey-sense for danger from other vehicles on the road. Unlike the track where you can put almost all your attention into looking where you want to go and how you get there, if you do that on the street that's when someone is going to pull out in front of you because you didn't notice that they hadn't made eye contact with you and were looking the other way. I guess in CSS terms, that would maybe be the wide view? Maybe that's still vision but with a different emphasis on detecting potential dangers.
  8. 2 points
    In my opinion, for street riding, if you have the greatest ability to steer quickly but, don’t have visual skills you wouldn’t steer away from the problem. I think the highest priority is visual skills. I think the second highest is quick steer. In my opinion, if you can quick steer to full lean (excessive for street riding but, if a deer or car are coming into your lane maybe it’s not excessive) and have great visual skill, then I don’t know how you could be bad at riding. I would imagine if you had both of those skills, rolling on the throttle would be easy because you wouldn't run out of track/road.
  9. 2 points
    #3 as I find the need to scan the road surface for hazards through corners has the potential to cause target fixation issues (for me) that you're more freed from on the track where you can practice better visual skills without worrying so much about the pavement surface itself.
  10. 1 point
    A few years back there was some footage of Casey Stoner. He was out front, way ahead, in a fast corner, lost the front end...then it came back! The announcer was all over it, and half a lap later, they cut back to the camera that was his hand, facing back looking at him. When he lost the front, you could see him let go of the bars! That of course is what allowed the bike to recover. He had just enough pressure to keep the throttle on, but he hands visibly opened as the front tucked and recovered. Pretty cool. CF
  11. 1 point
    Why is that with current high performance tire sets that you fully reach the edge of the rear tire, there is still a half inch "chicken strip" remaining on the front tire? One would think you would reach the edge at the same lean angle. Thanks in advance. Greg D.
  12. 1 point
    This may be an oversimplification but I thought it was because the rear tire is wider than the front on the higher horsepower bikes. The effect is a lot less noticeable on smaller, lower HP bikes where the tire sizes are not as different front to back.
  13. 1 point
    hi! i have a question, is my internal foot position right? i have a bmw s1000xr and touch knee down on track, but i feel aching knee , i rapidly feel fatigued. i see that people that ride supersport put internal foot near vertical , but i'm not able to do it... i put the foot more or less pointing in front,like the foto of naked bike, (also if it isn't myself) maybe that on a naked type bike the footrest are not toward rear , and force to that position?
  14. 1 point
    Ha, 27 in a 60 year old body...I don't think I made it past about 18 in my emotional development...that or I've been in my mid-life crisis for about 30 years CF
  15. 1 point
    Hi Apollo, We have some good threads on tires, but I'll take a quick swing at this: The goal is to discover traction, not assume it--I'm not of the opinion that one should just "trust" the tires--find out how good they are working! This is harder to do on the front, easier to do on the rear. If the morning is cool/cold, (and let's assume no tire warmers) then you have to put heat in the tires, which builds from flexing the carcass, so heat comes from the inside out. So start easy, gradually increase the pace. Straight line accel and braking help a little to flex the carcass, but still needs both sides warmed, which is achieved by cornering and putting them on a load, gradually increasing that load. On a modern Dunlop slick, this can take 3 laps on even just a cool day, maybe more on a cold day, or very first ride. On some very cold days, they won't ever get to temp. If you have a good lock on the bike with the lower body (arms are not being used to support the body), the front will feel like it's a bowling ball, stiff and slippery, not "hooked up" at all. As it warms, you will feel more resistance, it's "biting" more and will track a tighter line once turned in. This is a super short comment, we have a lot of good data up here on tires, and cold tires too. Let me know if this helps, or you need any assistance finding more info. Best, Cobie
  16. 1 point
    The fronts don't get to the edge, on any of the bikes we've had for years. The rear will go all the way, the front always has a "chicken strip". That's a good question though, are there any bikes they do get to the edge, besides full race bikes (WSB or MotoGP). CF
  17. 1 point
    Hi gang! I'm Roberts, a 27 year old enthusiast trapped in a 60 year old body. It's not my fault. I blame it on time. with 40+ years of street and off-road riding, I was not surprised to find out I have a lot of flaws. What does surprise is how hard it is to overcome dangerous habits. It's my hope that work with CSS and crew, and inputs from all of you, will help me to fix my problems before they 'fix' me.
  18. 1 point
    For riding at the track, the skill (or lack of) that's holding me back from advancing is feeling front end grip and riding near the limit. I'm not sure why. Maybe it's fear of a low side that's keeping me from riding near the limit? The one and only time I've ever put a bike on the ground was a low side in an off-camber decreasing radius where I felt like I had everything working just right until I was sliding on my back. I blame that incident on my stupidity of pushing cold tires but it's put a road block in my advancement and I wish there was a way to get past that to develop finer feel for the limit. I'm a dirt bike guy as well and I'm comfortable with that bike moving around under me at and beyond the limit of traction but for some reason I just can't trust myself to push the bike into any kind of slide at the track knowing that I can control it. Also, I never throw my leg over a motorcycle without hearing protection. I'm a poster case for being stupid about that earlier in my life and I'm just trying to save the hearing I have left.
  19. 1 point
    I vote this as best answer. Rereading the question, I must have heard Family Fued music playing in my head when I answered. 😂
  20. 1 point
    Ranked. I think visual skills and quick reflexes are the most important for street riding. Riders need to be able to absorb and react to information from the road in order to avoid hazards. Quick reflexes are important, especially with regards to braking and steering inputs. I don't cover the brakes on track, but I definitely do on the street. 1. Visual skill, lack of target fixation 2. Quick reflexes 3. Ability to steer quickly 4. Physical condition, strength 5. Brave
  21. 1 point
    That came through in your original post and I just paraphrased it poorly. Thank again for all your (and Cobie's) insights on this! Wes
  22. 1 point
    Hi Pitts, I follow you on all the points above...it's a big subject (the visual skills, and what cause problems with being able to continually keep them working well for you). I"m just going to touch on this with a few comments. I'd say one element in keeping one from target fixing, is familiarity with the environment. Is one less likely to have target fixation on a road/track that is known well? Another will be controlling that environment, at a suitable speed for each person. Some can handle a quicker rate of this than others. Then gradually increasing that speed. Some just go too fast on the street for what I consider a speed that allows for enough margin for error. I just don't go fast on the street any more (had a few close calls, don't care for that). Lastly, what condition is the person in physically at that time? Well fed, well rested, not dehydrated, etc., can have a huge effect on a person's mental state. And the mind is a whole other subject! This are all pretty big stabs at this, so I might just be opening can here :). Best, Cobie
  23. 1 point
    I was told 33 front, 34 rear on Q3+ for "spirited" riding. Have been happy with that, will likely start with same on my Q4's (which should be to me Wednesday).
×
×
  • Create New...