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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/23/2017 in Posts

  1. 3 points
    A couple of other things to be cautious about. 1. Puddles. Not only because of the hydroplaning potential. Hit one at speed and all the water in the puddle nearly instantaneously will soak you and add lots of weight to you. 2. Tar snakes and patches. Not all traction is created equal. Tar snakes will cause a lot more traction issues when they are wet. Some patched areas have more or less traction than the main part of the track. 3. Visibility. Visor fogging (easily fixed), Mist from other bikes, fog and rain on your visor can reduce visibility. Use a clear shield at all times to avoid this and preferably a clear windshield on your bike to maximize visibility. The straights are a gigantic wind powered windshield wiper for your helmet if you stick your head up in the air stream and move it from side to side. 4. Slippery when wet. Controls, pegs, tanks and other parts of the bike are not as easy to hold onto when your bike is wet. Be aware.
  2. 3 points
    Personally I love riding in the rain. Less traffic and at the end of the day it's like having your own private track when everyone packs up and leaves early. When other riders are angry and horrified about the R word I'm thinking "heck yea"! Some of the things that change in my riding in the rain. 1. Braking. Earlier, lighter, longer. Stretch out the braking zone and leave yourself a buffer just in case. 2. Lean angle. Less is more. You stay on the fatter part of the tire and maintain more traction. Hang WAY off the bike to reduce lean angle. The more you hang off even at slower speeds keeps you on the more stable part of the tire. 3. Line. It's critical to use ALL of the track available to flatten out the corners as much as possible. 4. Less aggressive quick steer. I have found that you absolutely still can quick steer in the rain if you stay reasonable with it. I worried the heck out of a CSS coach when he assigned me the quick steer drill in the rain. I performed the drill too. I even got a hug when I came back in one piece. 5. Throttle. You have to be a lot easier on the throttle especially when the bike is leaned over. On "analog" bikes once the bike is straight up and down you can use the throttle to "sample" traction. Give it gas and you can feel where the tire wants to spin just a bit. That is the fine line of where the traction ends. Don't cross the line especially when leaned over. (I would approach this with caution!). On bikes like the S1000RR in the right mode the bike will protect you for the most part on the gas. I find that I prefer sport mode or higher in the rain but rain mode is more protective and best to start out with. 6. Smooth counts. Abrupt and sloppy inputs that are ignored because of mega grippy tires are not tolerated at all by the bike in the wet. Stuff to watch out for! 1. Curbing. It's fine to run over curbing in the dry but in the wet that stuff becomes really slick. You have WAY less traction than you do in the dry on painted parts. 2. Panic. If you end up overdoing it don't panic!!!! With less traction the bike is much less willing to be forgiving for sloppy and abrupt inputs. If you enter a corner too fast just extend your braking past the optimal turn point and use the track you have available. Bring the bike down to a manageable speed and turn where you can. Yes you essentially "blow" the corner but by using the track you have you keep it on the pavement. 3. Tires. It's COMPLETELY true what was said about tire temps earlier. Your tires won't maintain temp. Not only are you dealing with the slick surface created by a wet track you are doing it essentially on cold tires. I set a cold pressure and leave it there. You can even experiment a bit with dropping the pressure but I'm not really sure it helps much and can potentially make the bike feel a bit mushy and imprecise if you overdo it. You still won't get a lot of heat in the tires. 4. Your physical condition. Riding in the rain seems easier but you do still get tired. Since you aren't sweating like crazy the fatigue sneaks up on you. I rode every single session of a wet track day only to figure out during the last session that I was a lot more fatigued than I realized. This fatigue can be both mental and physical. Stay sharp!
  3. 2 points
    Pitts- I thought about your willingness to identify and resolve a training gap and I’m reminded of an online conversation about stress reactions that I think you were a participant of in our POA days. My recollection is that the forum was lopsided in the notion that one could train responses to any emergency situation, after all that’s what the FAA teaches us. Henning was dead set on the notion that SRs were hardwired into a person and that each person may only modify their personal SRs to some degree with training but in the end, there they were - a pessimistic approach, I agree but experience tells us that a morsel of truth is present. Even in my days as a student pilot with Jon, my instructor yelling at me and trying to intentionally induce stress, nothing happens in the cockpit very fast, perceptually; motorcycle - different ballgame. I don’t know why that is but I think what Keith Code describes as Sense of Space may apply. I am of the belief that stress cannot be induced in a laboratory, sans chemicals, and even that is different. In the times before me, the FAA emphasized stall recovery training, then they went to a model of stall awareness and avoidance in effort to curb low altitude Loss Of Control In Flight incidents. I haven’t done a statistical review to say if it is working or not, but I have had the experience of putting my training into real life practice, and I and my passengers are still here and they are none-the-wiser as to how close we came to LOCI on takeoff one hot summer day years ago. Perhaps it may be a worthwhile venture to revamp the HURT report to include a review of the efficacy of training methodologies on single- vehicle accidents. While it may or may not solve your particular malady, I perceive that you are motivated to discover something overlooked to benefit the community at large. Lastly, I also took note of your mention of “The Pace”. I do believe that is a definite gap in training and you may be in a good position to advance this ideology earlier in the training cycle and to also benefit by a review and dissection of it.
  4. 2 points
    Most likely the coach at the track day was trying to help riders avoid the common error of braking (which compresses the forks) then releasing the brakes (which allows them to extend again) then turning the bike (which compresses them again). This bouncing up and down is, as you can imagine, counterproductive to accurate and predictable steering. In a simple corner the ideal scene is to be coming off the brakes as you are turning the bike, so the forces transfer from the deceleration forces to the cornering forces and keep the forks compressed instead of popping up and back down again. As far as telling you how exactly how much effect that is going to have, it is not realistic to think anyone can do that for you, there are far too many variables (suspension setup, rider and bike weight, braking style, steering input rate, surface traction, shape of turn, and so forth). You will have to experiment with it yourself, on your own bike and observe it. Almost certainly YES you can improve it with riding technique (have you been to school and had the Hook Turn material yet? Or the slow brake release classroom session?), unless your front suspension is extremely stiff in compression or has rebound damping set excessively low. Definitely you can sharpen up the steering on a bike by lowering the front a bit, but if taken too far this can compromise stability and you can get headshake, or twitchiness in the steering. Not sure the GSXR750 would need much changing on geometry, though, my impression of those were that they had nice handling. In the specific turns you describe (T1 and T3), are you trying to turn the bike while still on the gas? For sure that will make it harder to steer. Are you ABLE to steer it now and just noticing the amount of effort required, or are you running wider than you want in those turns?
  5. 2 points
    My coach at Laguna Seca noticed I was getting on the throttle too early in the second part of turn 2. I told him the same thing, I begin a smooth, even, continuous roll on after steering is complete. He advised me that because a throttle roll-on tends to make a bike hold its line, I should begin roll-on when steering is complete and the bike is pointed where I want it to go. The little bit of extra time off the throttle did help me get a better line and drive out of the corner.
  6. 2 points
    Yesterday I received in my email, a Keith Code article, Speed and Direction and I think the article struck a chord with regard to what I’m trying to solve. The article isn’t yet posted in the articles section, so it must be new. From it, this particular section seemed relevant and as I slept overnight I awoke with a different idea on how it applies to my current barrier ”Any rider's true skill level can only be measured by his ability to determine exactly WHERE to change or maintain speed and direction and execute the right AMOUNT of each. There are no other components to skill.“
  7. 2 points
    Other than the slip between tyre and road, the engine is mechanically linked to the tarmac. By that it means that for any given speed, rpm is constant for a particular gear, regardless of throttle position. Let's say you need 5000 rpm to go 60 mph in 4th gear. Regardless of where the throttle is, be that full off or full on or anywhere in between, you will have exactly 5000 rpm at 60 mph in a straight line. Unless the tyre is spinning or the clutch is slipping. Now, if you lean over, the circumference of the tyre is reduced. This has a similar effect to lowering the gearing. But while lower gearing mean that the engine must turn more revolutions in order to get the wheel turned a certain amount of times, now the wheel must turn faster to maintain the speed, bringing the engine along with it. This could probably be explained much simpler, but as long as you remember that when the engine turns over X times it always makes the tyre turn Y times in gear Z. A smaller wheel must turn faster than a larger diameter wheel for any given speed, and so the engine must turn X+n to compensate.
  8. 2 points
    I thought I knew how beneficial it would be and I thought I knew what I wanted to get out of it. I was kinda wrong on both counts. The personal consultant approach makes the leap between L3 and L4 huge. Take what we all know about CSS coaches. They're well versed in the hangups regular humans have in riding motorcycles fast and they're incredibly skilled at breaking down those barriers and knowing what the riders need to become better. Now, take those skills and remove the confines of teaching 5 new skills in a day and just let them have the time to fix whatever needs fixing and that's the difference between L3 and L4. I was at SoW. I was struggling at the kink and it turned out the problem was actually starting at the turn-in for 8. This was nice but the next revelation was that I was turning too slowly. It never felt like it to me because I was able to hit my marks at the speed I was riding. But much like the previous issue, the solution was not what I expected. I thought once I had more pace, I'd turn more quickly. But once they got me to really turn more quickly, I found that I had to up my pace. Again, the solution to a known problem was far from intuitive. After circling SoW who knows how many times at basically the same pace (better form each time but never more pace), being forced to do quick-turn correctly (in my case, push-pull) forced me to approach the corners with more pace because if had turned more quickly at the same entrance speed, of course, I would have early apexed. This one change got me 9 seconds. Next year I'm going to find a stretch of 3 or 4 days at SoW and book multiple days at once. Primary focus (I think) will be T1. Can't wait.
  9. 2 points
    I found 2 exercises made a huge difference in my ability to ride without fatigue. They're both hitting the same area so you can do either one. Romanian deadlift and back hyper-extension. You can buy a kettle bell or some dumbbells for the deadlift and do them at home. If you belong to a gym, the hyper-extension allows for greater isolation but they both work great. Start light and do 20 reps a day for a couple of weeks. I found it not only made riding easier but also improved my posture. I'm never tired, my wrists never hurt, my back is strong enough stay low and move side to side without issues. Interestingly, I my fitbit records my rides as cardio.
  10. 2 points
    One thing I will mention - there is limited info available in the video above. You can hear the engine, see the rider's line and observe lean angle, but one thing you CAN'T tell is the relationship between the rider's throttle-hand INPUT and the engine response. So in the video above when you hear the engine rev up, it sounds odd in some places, like it revs up very quickly then flattens out a bit. That could be caused by traction control intervening (if it is present on this bike), by the tire spinning, maybe even by the clutch slipping - clutches wear out quickly on high horsepower race bikes, race starts are very hard on clutches - it is hard to tell without seeing data that shows throttle input. On the Superbike School student videos the camera is positioned so that the rider's hand is visible on screen, so it would become immediately obvious whether the rider's throttle input was smooth and consistent or not, plus the BMWs can tell you the actual difference between throttle INPUT (from the rider) and OUTPUT (after any traction control intervention) and the data logger can show tire slip rate, too, all of which would make it easier to analyze the video.
  11. 1 point
    Finally was able to get the video to play through. Thanks for posting it.
  12. 1 point
    Hi Apollo, We have some good threads on tires, but I'll take a quick swing at this: The goal is to discover traction, not assume it--I'm not of the opinion that one should just "trust" the tires--find out how good they are working! This is harder to do on the front, easier to do on the rear. If the morning is cool/cold, (and let's assume no tire warmers) then you have to put heat in the tires, which builds from flexing the carcass, so heat comes from the inside out. So start easy, gradually increase the pace. Straight line accel and braking help a little to flex the carcass, but still needs both sides warmed, which is achieved by cornering and putting them on a load, gradually increasing that load. On a modern Dunlop slick, this can take 3 laps on even just a cool day, maybe more on a cold day, or very first ride. On some very cold days, they won't ever get to temp. If you have a good lock on the bike with the lower body (arms are not being used to support the body), the front will feel like it's a bowling ball, stiff and slippery, not "hooked up" at all. As it warms, you will feel more resistance, it's "biting" more and will track a tighter line once turned in. This is a super short comment, we have a lot of good data up here on tires, and cold tires too. Let me know if this helps, or you need any assistance finding more info. Best, Cobie
  13. 1 point
    To answer your question above, yes I do sometimes still catch myself getting target fixed when I enter an unfamiliar corner and think I've come in too fast. My personal solution is that I've trained myself that, whenever I feel compelled to pull the brake (as opposed to doing it in a controlled and conscious way), I look in to the apex. I've associated that feeling of "needing" to brake with being target fixed so now as soon as I feel that desire to pull the brake, I look to the inside to get my eyes moving the right direction.
  14. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I m very interested in doing a 2 day camp, but I m not sure where. I've never ridden on a track. My first pick is Laguna Seca but I wonder how it compares to other tracks available for the 2 day camps. Chris
  15. 1 point
    Hello all, I've been a fly on the wall for a while now - I appreciate all the knowledge and discussion here. Recently signed up so I could ask some questions and participate. Began riding on a 1983 Honda z50 when I was six and I've been through quite a few bikes since (all dirt until I was in my 20's, now I'm in my 40's and mostly ride street and track, still get on the dirt from time to time though). I've been to a two-day camp and a couple single days with CSS and can't say enough great things about what Keith started and the CSS team carries on. The closest thing to race experience I've had was working as a Corner Marshall at the 2018 MotoGP event at COTA - on Comms to race control at T14 for four days. It was great to see the action up close and participate in the safety of the races. I live outside Austin, TX and about 35 miles from COTA - that and Harris Hill are my local tracks, haven't made it to MSR Cresson or Houston yet. I've been on the fence about getting into CRMA - family and other passions make the financial side difficult to justify. Anyway, greetings, I appreciate the opportunity to become a part of this online community.
  16. 1 point
    Regarding ease of steering: you can push the inside bar (push right bar to go right...) but you can and should also pull the opposite bar. Some people have a hard time coordinating this if they have not done so before.
  17. 1 point
    Can you be more specific in your question? The basic throttle rule (see Twist of the Wrist II) is the same. If your specific question is in regards to Spaghetti's comment above about adding lean angle while accelerating - that action is not recommended, as it is a classic way to overload the rear tire and lose traction, but generally speaking a smaller displacement bike (assuming good tires and suspension) would be easier to manage because it has less available power to feed to the rear tire. It is pretty easy, on a modern 600 or 1000cc sport bike, to break the rear tire loose by adding throttle and lean at the same time. It is tougher to do on something like a 250cc or 300cc bike, but certainly not impossible, if you lean it over far enough and especially if you are abrupt with the throttle application. The traction control available on the S1000rr helps a great deal in avoiding applying too much throttle while leaned over, as it manages the power based on measured lean angle, however if a rider aggressively ADDS lean angle and throttle together, it is still possible to overwhelm the rear tire. I must say, though, the S1000rr is amazingly easy to ride, even for a rider new to high HP machines, the electronics in it are amazing, it has been an incredible training tool for the school.
  18. 1 point
    Ello people :) Im new to Sportsbike riding and watched Twist of the wrist a few times and browsing the forum loads I thought I’d register to ask a couple of questions that I’m struggling with ? cheers Dan
  19. 1 point
    I'd been working on my accuracy. It seems that the product of that has been consistency. This means that I tend to get consistent placement on where I want to be, just not as accurate as I would like. I'm a foot or less from where I want to place my wheels, and it seems that closing that distance to apex for example is a battle with self. Best I can come up with is that it's a vision deficiency but I don't know what to do to correct it. I latched onto a faster rider, but was just unable to duplicate the lines or keep enough pace to be able to follow for more than a few corners. But I did learn something by doing so. Looking for ideas of what I can try differently. Next trackday in 2 weeks.
  20. 1 point
    There are defensive and offensive lines when racing. Tactical vs Strategic choices. Racecraft is the proper mixture of the two. I once witnessed a rider on a slower bike hold off a faster bike by altering exit lines (not weaving) and beating him to the line FOR THE WIN.
  21. 1 point
    Hello from Seattle! A few weeks ago, I volunteered as a corner worker at The Ridge during a CSS class. I've heard nothing but great things about the class so I signed up for August 6 & 7th at VIR. I'm looking forward to the class, meeting fellow motorcycle fanatics, and trying out an S1000RR!
  22. 1 point
    Interesting point! Cheers! One of the reasons that I didn't want to use my knee as a lean angle gauge is that when your knee touches down, it doesn't mean that you can't lean any more. I prefer to spend my attention on feeling traction at the tyres and use that as my gauge. But I guess I'll just have to make an effort to try and stop pulling my leg in towards the bike... if you expect your knee to touch down, that means it can't surprise you, right?!?
  23. 1 point
    Well I think you've read enough data here and there to have plenty of food for thought. Really the rest is up to you to experiment with. It seems to me that a person like you is all about the journey vs the destination so enjoy your journey!
  24. 1 point
    I see so much of myself here that I felt I needed to follow the discussion.
  25. 1 point
    I'd like to discuss rear slides a moment. In all cases below, the rider is leaned over in a turn. For simplicity sake, let's say the rider is mid-corner, established in said right turn and the corner is flat, level and symmetrical. Let's also define the apex of the corner as the geometric center of the turn. Let's also say the rider's throttle control is standard. Bike on dry pavement the rear end slides, the rider is loose on the bars and allows the bike to attempt to self-correct. Which way do the bars turn? Bike on a compromised surface and the rear end slides, the rider is loose on the bars and allows the bike to attempt to self-correct. Do the bars turn? Can the rider in either scenario turn the bars to give a corrective action? Is the answer the same for both conditions 1 and 2? If the rider give the opposite input to the bars in a slide scenario will the rider's action aggravate the situation? Is the answer the same for both conditions 1 and 2? After the above scenario #1, let's assume the rider's throttle control isn't standard. In fact, the rider has a timing error with the increased roll-rate and initiates a pickup of the bike post-apex in attempt to alleviate some of the turning forces. Due to the timing error, the throttle comes on at the same time (or perhaps with a microsecond lead) as an aggressive pick-up steering input. The rear end begins to slide. Is the slide in the same direction as above? Because the bike is vertical (or nearly so) but still following a circular trajectory which direction does the front end turn for corrective action? Can aggressiveness of a pickup cause an upset of traction? (I once called this a quick "un-flick")
  26. 1 point
    Pickup is a conscious decided effort. The rider intends to lift the bike to vertical at a much earlier point in the turn than allowing a lazy vertical movement later when the bike is decidedly passed the exit.
  27. 1 point
    This is pure speculation but I'd imagine that the front wheel begins to lift at a point well above 60% weight distribution. But if you could instead find a balance point where all of the power being used it for propulsion than lifting the front wheel, where would that be in relation to the ideal 60%?
  28. 1 point
    We care the most about inducing the 40/60 weight distribution via throttle control when we need maximum performance from the tires and the suspension, when cornering on asphalt as fast as possible. If, while cornering like that, we put more weight on one tire, we compress that suspension and load that tire beyond the optimum state or conditions. The suspension becomes harder, the contact patch becomes a little bigger and the profile of the tire less pliable. Following the irregularities of the pavement is more difficult for the tire. The rubber becomes less elastic and it changes its shape more slowly. Once the weight carried by that tire while cornering hard reaches a crtical point, the available traction that the over-loaded tire can offer rapidly decreases. During a leaned wheelie, all the weight of the bike and the rider is on the rear tire and on the rear suspension. That tire would not be able to develop the traction demanded by the lateral forces of extreme cornering, which normally surpass the value of that weight. The wheelie always happens during the way out of the corner and at a lean angle that is much smaller than the max lean angle required by that turn. If the rider tries to wheelie the bike at that max lean angle, when the lateral forces of cornering on the contact patch are close to the max, the tire would slide. The tire would not slide only if the rear contact patch has been unloaded enough from lateral forces in a way that its performance can be reduced by the the extra weight.
  29. 1 point
    Dylan brought up exactly the point one of the riding coaches at Grattan pointed out to me. My entry speeds are too low, so I'm grabbing a handful of throttle to make up for it. This is what I would like to work on at my next CSS visit (CODE Race in October)... The plot below is also MO, but from my DAIR suit instead of the BMW logger. It let me overlay my S1000RR lap (blue) with my other bike (red-Daytona 675R, running Dunlop Q3s). Sorry, the turn numbers are different from the BMW log. I learned all the tracks on my Daytona, and I know I need to adjust my braking points and entry speeds for getting more out of the S1000RR and slicks, but you can see in the overlay that I'm basically riding the two bikes the same, just accelerating and braking harder on the straights with the S1000RR. I'm actually faster through the chicane and keyhole (turns 10 and 11) with the Daytona, and this seems like a mental issue I need to sort out, as the S1000RR should be able to the do the same thing!
  30. 1 point
    Wish I had a computer to look at the video frame by frame... but I don't think there's anything too mysterious happening here... For those who have ever done a quick change of direction through a slalom or short chicane you might have noticed that it takes very little throttle (or any at all, if the steering rate is so quick?) to lift the front wheel as the bike is coming upright on the change of direction. This is because the steering rate is so great, you have the inertia of the bike coming from lean to upright, the mass of the bike combined with that inertia means that it wants to keep going up - hence lifting the front wheel. If you're then trying to lean the bike over in the other direction while the front wheel is in the air... well you can guess what happens. I've also seen this with strange geometry/weighting. It was on a work delivery scooter, bit of weight in the top box, a quick-ish u-turn or even just straightening up quickly out of a regular corner would bring the front wheel off the ground and cause a decent tank slapper if not controlled properly. Given the extremes that MotoGP racers are dealing with it wouldn't surprise me if Vinales front wheel came off the ground and caused him to crash.
  31. 1 point
    This is John Lee by the way... the one that ran into a little hiccup on my level 3 day. You guys went way above and beyond what was necessary and just wanted to say thank you again. Laura you were totally awesome looking out for me without hesitation. I noticed after reviewing some of my lap footage that between lvl 1+2 earlier in the month I didn't bother opening up the bike on the straights and just focused on the drills and cornering; and by level 4 I improved dramatically (on average 20% faster on the corners); so while in lvl 2 I would hit 140mph on the main straight in lvl 4 I stayed in 3rd gear 9k rpm even on the straight not trying to speed the straights and just focus on the corners and yet my overall lap times were faster; something both Laura and Pete pointed out. Definitely noticeable on the streets too. I'll post my personal riding issue in the Student Success Stories Still have a long ways to go but you guys gave me a great head start; I will be practicing until the next time. Thanks to my coaches along the way: Level 1 - Brian Level 2 - Connor Level 3 - Laura Level 4 - Pete You guys rock.
  32. 1 point
    Hey! My name is Adam Z. I am looking to get heavily involved in racing....now! I am from Arlington, VA and I am moving to Phoenix, AZ in August. I will be racing at Chuckwalla as soon as I can! I have taken Level I and II at Streets of Willow earlier this year and loved it. Hooked. Cannot get enough! I am taking Level III in September at Streets again. My riding experience is definitely new (only a year old) but I learn fast and listen well. I raced an 1198s and blew it up...it will be rebuilt! Until then, I have an 848 evo for the street, and I am going to buy an S1000rr in December. I came to learn how to ride safer, faster, and better. I do not ride that fast on the street, but if there is a race at the track, I get soooo hype. I love it and I love finding a flow. I am learning a lot and cannot wait to keep learning!!!!! I have a few personal goals for riding and racing, one of them being the IoM TT within the next 4 years. Thank you for allowing me to join and for this community of education. PS- I want to be the fastest of all time ever. Big dreams, big personality, standing at an astounding 5'3".
  33. 1 point
    I have the people and resources at my access- there's nothing preventing me from seeing if I can get some interest from the scientific community at my access. I will pitch it tomorrow.
  34. 1 point
    I am not actually dissing hanging off - it will make it possible to corner a bit faster. It will not gain you many seconds per lap, but it will gain maybe 2-3 on average for a top rank rider (me speculating here). Of course, even if it's just a tenth it's worth while. However, I think there are far more important aspects for riders to learn than hanging off. If someone goes faster than before with considerable less lean when the rider start hanging off, it does not (me making a statement) have nearly as much to do with the riding position as with the rider having improved other things (see MOTORRAD figures for what hanging off brings). Also, for street riding, hanging off has disadvantages that, for me at least, outweigh any benefit of leaning a bit less; it is tiring, it usually means you cannot see as far around a corner, and it can make it harder to change direction for something unexpected. But I'm sure there are those finding it worth while. Anyway, it all boil down to this; I believe hanging off is credited for more than it can actually deliver. It is no doubt an important tool for the expert rider, but again I think there are a lot of things that can help much more when it comes to riding safe and fast. Here's a video of Mike Hailwood racing a Ducati. It's fun to watch him going quicker through the esses, despite having a chopperesque amount of wheelbase, rake and trail. The Ducati also made substantially less power than the Kawasaki and Honda that came 2nd and 3rd. It would be very interesting to hear what the coaches think is the main reason why Mike goes that quick compared to the competition, as I do not have a clue.
  35. 1 point
    I'll try and explain it the best that I can. First in any engineering physics class covering classical mechanics involving circular motions will state in the book Centrifugal "Force" in quotes usually or at least call it a fake/false force. Second is to understand reference frames and in classical mechanics we use non-inertial reference frames. Take an example of you standing in the back of a pickup truck doing 50mph and throwing a tennis ball off the back away from the direction of travel; and you throw this ball say 20mph. Now you the thrower of the ball observe it clear as day moving in the opposite direction from the direction you're travelling... and at a rate of 20mph (which is correct in reference to you and the truck)... now take an observer standing off to the side of the road looking perpendicular to the road and he sees the ball still moving in the direction of the travel of the truck and you just at 30mph (which is also correct in reference to the observer). But which is "correct"; now ignore air resistance and gravity to the mix as we're not trying to calculate the rate of decrease of the speed and arc of the motion and so on... we're applying ideal physics to understand the parts we want to figure out what's going on. So in circular motion for an inertial reference frame one common example is that of you sitting on spinning disc (say a merry go round) and releaseing a ball on the disc and observe it in an outward motion; it's best to actually see it in effect to see how weird things get in difference reference frames... here's a video showing some non intuitive things occurring in that situation The biggest mistake the average person that doesn't have a lot of background in physics and just reads up on some aspects of it when researching circular motion is applying Newton's laws of motion incorrectly in an wrong reference frames; you probably heard people saying well yes there is this inward force called centripetal force but Newton's law says there is an equal and opposite force when not accelerating to give a net 0 force and that force is the centrifugal force. Only correct when in the inertial reference frame for this circular motion example. Another non intuitive mistake made is that almost all of us have been in a car at some point, and taken a turn or a curve, and we swear we are being pushed outward from the curve and that is the centrifugal force we "feel". But it's actually inertia you're feeling. Let's say you're in the passenger seat; on this turn (left turn) you are pushed to the door and say I'm going outward. But in fact the car is moving inward left turn; and you are still moving forward; so naturally you hit the door. So analyze a motorcycle taking a turn (left turn again); you know at any point you were only going straight and you added input to turn left and lean to the left. You can say you "feel" and outward force but analyze where did this magical outward force come from; we know the downward force is from gravity (which is mysterious in itself). When you lowside the bike and rider don't all of a sudden end up moving "outward" of the turn; they end up sliding forward (minus any weird tire contact of the wheel causing a different motion) but you get the idea. That's about the simplest way I can try and explain it.. but you want to apply physics in the discussion from text and online sources; majority of it will be from classical mechanics which is all non-inertial reference frames. A lot of people don't understand that part and apply intuition to the mix and confusion erupts. I plan on posting up some videos on some of the physics misconceptions after I review CSS when I go for lvl 1+2 next week. Personally I think a lot of the youtube instructions out there like ridesmart and individuals would do a lot better just explaining "do this to get this result" and leave out the why part; seems like 90% is accurate and then 10% is made up physics interpretation on their part and discredits the 90% they just got right.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    And Keith goes on to say this: "In real time and space, each 0.1-second that you stay away from the gas is over one bikelength of distance in a 60mph turn. In fact, it is 8.8 feet". (Page 26). That's a scary amount to lose, added up over the turns. You'll never gain it back. Me, I'm a terror for delaying getting back on the gas. But I'm trying to get better, I'm really am ..
  38. 1 point
    At least two are steering, and the third could be also, since being able to carry more entry speed has a lot to do with being able to steer the bike quickly! You mentioned earlier that you had the idea that you needed to be on the brakes to compress the forks to steer the bike - did (or does) that misconception create the entry speed problem and the mid-corner adjustment problem you are trying to fix? Can you (personally) steer the bike more quickly (and carry more entry speed) if you are not also trying to brake hard enough to compress the forks? It is certainly less to worry about, easier to gauge entry speed, and easier to control the steering action, if you are not trying to brake hard at the same time. To be clear, compressing the forks CAN tighten up the steering by compressing the forks (this steepening the steering angle) but it can also make the bike harder to steer (more effort) and I have been in at least one back-and-forth debate with Cobie about which is the greater effect. Personally I almost never use the front brake for the sole purpose of compressing the front end - if I don't need the brakes to slow down, I don't use them. One exception that I can think of is a VERY fast chicane where I have difficulty getting the bike steered fast enough (only at my max pace), and I am driving going into the chicane. In that one case I do SOMETIMES us the front brake a little to help me get the quick direction change, because otherwise the forks are extended coming into it, because I am accelerating coming into it, and the combination of speed, momentum, and fork extension makes the direction change difficult in that tight chicane. A touch on the brakes helps to get it flicked over from one side to the other, but it is a bit tricky to do and I need a lot of free attention to get it right.
  39. 1 point
    Here's what I do - it keeps me entertained. First, the boring stuff. On regular roads, just surviving in traffic, my target is mainly just to have zero scary moments. I ride in a way where if someone else doesn't see me and I have to take evasive action, I hold myself accountable. If I ever brake with locked bars where steering is affected, that's another ding. Can't remember the last time it happened tho. But basically, on boring rides where you can't play, my mental checklist of mistakes is all I think about it. My commute traverses a 5 mile mountain-peak road with beautiful curves, sheer drops, and smooth pavement... it's a track. On a road like this, my goals include all those others but I focus more on technique. There's a very steep downhill 90 degree turn into a driveway at the end. I practice braking without messing up the steering. There's a lot of slow traffic. I practice timing my passes. I don't really work up speed high enough to need the brakes, but at each corner, I practice rolling off the throttle. My goal is to get the timing perfect so that the engine braking doesn't slow me down too much and make the corner boring. I ride the "racing line" within my lane and practice the 3 step at every corner. I practice rolling on the gas coming out of every corner. If I'm stuck behind a slow car, I practice hanging off at speeds which don't allow much lean. I practice the hip flick and the light bar pressure, exercising my outer thigh and combine this will all the other things I'm working on. There are a couple of really tight corners (intersections) with changes in pavement which tempt my eyes to watch the apex way too long. I concentrate on wide vision to get me around those tight square corners smoothly, fast, and without drama. I don't know if I'm still improving but I know I'm not wasting my miles either. I'm blessed with a daily chance to reinforce what the good folks at CSS taught me. I have fun on the bike without giving up a safety margin and very few of of my rides have a close call (or any call where I depended on another driver to avoid me). So I get to my destination without feeling like luck bailed me out. If you want to know you're getting better, my advice is pick your favorite track and hook up a lap timer and start trying to "get better."
  40. 1 point
    are the "articles" archived? i remember one a few months ago (about weighting the foot pegs) and i never saved the email. gotta believe that good stuff is saved somewhere... and i'd like to re-read that email.
  41. 1 point
    After reading reviews and actually discussing with their respective tech support, I ended up with HM and Healtech being a tie; followed by Annitori quick shifter as a close 3rd. HM has good reviews but seems more prominent in Europe and not a large dealership in US; They also were priciest for what I wanted. But they seem to have an excellent product. What they lacked that Healtech offers (and Annitori) is the ability to adjust and tune via bluetooth smartphone app; where HM you use the gearshift and an LED panel on unit. Healtech has a number of distributors in US and good pricing. Install is also very easy. What dropped Annitori to third was a number of reports of the unit misbehaving and cutting out the ignition at wrong times. The Healtech can be turned off via app, or unplugged and a jumper installed so it won't strand you. Its also VERY adjustable "if" needed. As I said, totally not needed on street but should be lots of fun.
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    Ha ok. Well the socks I'm currently wearing are samples from a manufacturer that were sent to me for testing. I have been a huge fan of bamboo and my favorite socks are no longer available. So out of sheer "being totally desparate" I'm testing out as many yarns as I can as I'd like to make my own socks specifically for riding. So far I'm on day 3 of wearing them and they still smell like roses. They are unbelievably soft as well, pretty much like walking on clouds. I'm going to wash them a number of times to see how they wear, but I've been told they stay soft just like my bamboo socks did. Another bonus, they are supposed to be extremely durable. I can show you the fabric end of this month when I'm at CSS but they will be well worn by then so beware hahah. I looked up "tencel socks" and there are a few companies that use the yarns so I think in the mean time I'll find a good company and buy my daily wearers from them. I truly don't think I can go back to pure cotton, poly, or nylon. Especially cotton.
  44. 1 point
    What Cobie said is even more prevalent in WSBK and MotoGP where the electronics and programming control of the bike are a world above what even a well funded Club Racer has, It's really comparing Apple's and Oranges with regards to the hardware your average rider has Also its important to remember that some times a point and shoot riding style is faster than a flowing maximum corner speed style, and often times a Racers top priority isn't taking the best line through a corner but making sure they don't get passed.
  45. 1 point
    Yup, I read that section again when thinking over a response to the original question above. Reading it with that specific question in mind gave me a new perspective on it, and I got more out of it than I had before. I can't tell you how many times I've read Twist of the Wrist II but as my riding has changed my understanding of various parts of the book has evolved to new levels, which says a heck of a lot about the book, because it is as valuable to me as an active racer as it was when I was a barely-intermediate rider. Amazing.
  46. 1 point
    OK. So... if you don't have a point picked out for an apex AND haven't looked in toward the apex, you don't really have any info about where you want the bike to go - so how confident will your quickturn be? This is a good review exercise for forum members, what is the timing on 2-step? When should you spot your turn point and when should you look in to the apex? Spot your turn point as soon as possible because it controls many decisions (where to brake, when to downshift, etc.). Without reference points, there is no turn point. No bueno. The time to look at your apex is just before you reach the turn point. A rider requires a turn point to have the attention left to spend on his next reference point, the apex. If a rider is confident on his/her location (turn point/reference point), the rider is "free" to look at the apex just before flicking the machine into the turn. Like in real estate, location, location, location is of primary importance. You must have RPs to get your through the turns; you can relax on the straights.
  47. 1 point
    I suppose that's one unique incentive to get on the gas early.
  48. 1 point
    Great article. I find the following the most interesting. The Stages of Body Positioning There are three stages to body positioning: Poor form + poor riding = ripple-effect, snowballing errors. Good riding + poor form = good but limited range of control. Good form + good technical riding skills = riding that is both fluid and efficient. I fell into #2 for quite some time. Improving my form on the bike has given me new found confidence. I am finding that I am having to "re-learn" steering in some cases because of how well the bike turns now. I have found that physical fitness plays a huge role in good form for me. Being physically stronger in my lower body gives me a more stable base and less fatigue when repositioning on the bike frequently. I learned this the hard way this past Level 4 when I had a great on track session where I made some major breakthroughs. When I got back to the pits and got off the bike I found it difficult to walk because my lower body was angry with me for demanding so much out of it.
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    For me finding a turnpoint and quickflipping the bike goes hand in hand, whenever my steering gets slower I follow lines and not points any more, and following lines eventually makes me tired and less concentrated.
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