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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/18/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Introducing more trail braking will absolutely increase your front tire wear, and on a lightweight, relatively low horsepower bike like yours it is certainly possible to have the front tire wear out first (compared to the rear) just from this change in riding style/habits. It makes sense, of course; by trail braking you are considerably increasing the load on the front tire in the corners, and instead of the braking forces being applied primarily with the bike upright, you are now putting braking forces on the tire while leaned over. So now the front tire has to handle steering/cornering load AND braking load on the sides of the tires, and that is where the wear is showing in your photo above. Additionally, that change in style could affect when and how hard you are applying the throttle in the corner, and how much you are, or are not, leaned over when driving out of the corners, which would change the wear on the rear tire - potentially decreasing it if the trail braking is causing you to delay your roll-on. There is not a lot of wear on the sides of the rear tire in your photo which would imply that the gas is not being rolled on very much while leaned over. I have a 250cc bike and at one point I tried doing a lot of trail braking on the track; I was racing other riders that were doing it a lot (in nearly every corner), so I decided to try that and see how it worked for me. I was very surprised at the change in my tire wear; as you just experienced, my front tire wore out first, and much more quickly than expected, where in the past the rear would wear out first. After that little experiment I changed back to using trail braking in the corners where it was appropriate but NOT in the ones where it wasn't needed, and I went faster and was a lot less worried about crashing. Most of the other riders I was seeing on track were WAY overusing trail braking, braking too long and too much for most corners.
  2. 1 point
    Can you be more specific in your question? The basic throttle rule (see Twist of the Wrist II) is the same. If your specific question is in regards to Spaghetti's comment above about adding lean angle while accelerating - that action is not recommended, as it is a classic way to overload the rear tire and lose traction, but generally speaking a smaller displacement bike (assuming good tires and suspension) would be easier to manage because it has less available power to feed to the rear tire. It is pretty easy, on a modern 600 or 1000cc sport bike, to break the rear tire loose by adding throttle and lean at the same time. It is tougher to do on something like a 250cc or 300cc bike, but certainly not impossible, if you lean it over far enough and especially if you are abrupt with the throttle application. The traction control available on the S1000rr helps a great deal in avoiding applying too much throttle while leaned over, as it manages the power based on measured lean angle, however if a rider aggressively ADDS lean angle and throttle together, it is still possible to overwhelm the rear tire. I must say, though, the S1000rr is amazingly easy to ride, even for a rider new to high HP machines, the electronics in it are amazing, it has been an incredible training tool for the school.
  3. 1 point
    Hello, I read positive content about California Bike School. Definitely a must do. I have been riding on and off since college when motorcycle endorsement never existed. I started very young with the Big-Wheel (my 3 wheeler as a toddler). Upgraded to the 2014 Triumph 675 Daytona. Of course I now have an endorsement. My most challenging and fun ride has been in Thailand on the Honda 600 CBR, a whopping 762 turns from Chiang Mai to Pai. Like anyone who seeks safety and proficiency as I practice in the cockpit for my airline, it begins and ends with training. The training does not stop. And that being said, I am certain I am carrying some good habits or techniques, but likely I have more bad ones than good ones. It’s my intention to be better through training and hope to get the support and advice through California Superbike School and the forum group who appears to have this common goal. I hope to also make friends along the way who may consider joining my group on adventurous motorbike tours, and I participate with other groups as well.
  4. 1 point
    I am dying to have some feedback on the behavior of the new s1000rr (announced tomorrow !!!) on the track...Entirely new bike, 207 hp... And I am even more curious about the behavior of the new Ducati V4R... with the Akra line, they announce 234 hp for only 165 kg, in a 998 cc (so OK for normal competition) ! If the frame and electronics (provided the suspensions should be top notch as they are full Akra and the brakes also high end) are good, that is it corners well, it could kill all competition...that also means that it should not be a special series as they must produce a minimum number of OEM bikes so that it's allowed in competitions. Price will also be way above average...but still should stay below 40000 euros (otherwise, again, the bike will not be allowed in most competitions), so still 1/2 the price of the HP4 Race...but anyway, all this is still just on paper...let see what test riders say when they take it out on track...big engine is one thing, but it is not sufficient to make it a killer bike on the track ! But it's all exciting ! But Kawa, Suz and Yam will need to bring their bikes to the next levels if the Ducati and BMW are not only big engines but also great cornering machines ! EXCITING !!!
  5. 1 point
    That filled in information that was missing for me when trying to understand why I had so much difficulty adapting to the early braking-before-turning way of riding after always trail-braking more or less to the apex. In the end, I wound up with a compromise just the way you described it above, but thought it was just me not being able to properly adapt to the "proper way" of turning in. Now I feel much better - thanks ☺️
  6. 1 point
    Sometimes, a rider is a perfect match for a bike, like Stoner on the Ducati. Doesn't mean the bike is particularly good, but that the combination is. That seems to be the case with the current Kawasaki, where Rea perhaps is able to use the extra torque that comes with a lower rev limit to good effect, whereas the others may struggle to get the bike to hook up and get drive. Just speculating, but there obviously he has found strengths with the bike others cannot utilize. You see the same thing with Honda in MotoGP, where only MM is consistently winning and taking podiums; it could be that that bike also is very difficult to master, but if you have that extra bit of talent - natural or learned - it may be possible to explore terrain restricted to "lesser" individuals.
  7. 1 point
    I cannot fathom how he stomps over everyone else. He manages to nearly holeshot every start and from there he charges forward like a raging bull. Then, he hardly makes mistakes either. Apparently there’s a formula for recognizing talent. As a Honda fan, I’m pretty teed off that Ten Kate couldn’t keep him. But he wouldn’t have had the success on such a lackluster machine- but I’m not sure if it’s the bike or the rider looking at the other Kwak riders in the WSBK field.
  8. 1 point
    I've made a lot of progress at different parts of Thunderhill East. I've gotten my corner speed up in 1, 2, 5b, 8, 14, 15. I am wanting to start getting my speed up in 3 but it's off camber and I am not sure I know how to attack it safely. I've heard approach off camber like a decreasing radius but I'm not sure what that means. I'd rather ask now than after a crash and then get those "Oh, you have to ______ in off camber corners." I realize the basic premise of having less grip but I also know I'm not on the limit. I'm looking for specific techniques that you have to use on this kind of corner. Thanks.
  9. 1 point
    I ride a Yamaha R3. I am on my second set of Micheline Pilot street tires. I changed my first set after 13,000 km. The rear tire was very worn and the front not so much. My problem is that now after 8000km the front tire is almost bald and the rear still has life in it. So what has changed? Two things that I can think of. One I adjusted my preload to reduce rear sag. I went from 3 (stock setting) to 5 which feels right to me. The second thing I have been doing different is working more on trail braking. Actually corner after corner for hours on end. Also many hours of the quick flick drill back and forth. I thought it might be a suspension problem causing the front to wear faster but I have to say that the bike feels great the way it is set up. I just want to know if this is normal wear on the front tire considering what I have been doing. I am hoping that someone can share their expertise with me so that I can understand. Thank you
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    As soon as I saw the photo, I was shouting (in my head), "GET IT GET IT!!!!" Glad you had a great time! It is definitely an amazing learning experience. Go forth and conquer!
  12. 1 point
    MaxMcAllister in his suspension clinic (can be found on YouTube) provides the info that all geometry changes have a side effect for every intended effect. He said it’s about 3:1 ratio of effect to side effect and many people chase setup issues because of missing information of knowing which end of the motorcycle to change. The cliff notes: he provides that front end changes effect corner entry to mid turn and rear end height changes effect mid turn to corner exit; being mindful of the side effect issue. My concern with prescribing a geometry change at this point is introducing another variable into the equation when rider input, vision, timing and throttle control haven’t been sorted, nor do we know if static sag and chassis balance have been baselined. My $.03 is aligned with the OP and Hotfoot’s process to establish what the rider is doing and how the bike is responding.
  13. 1 point
    Most likely the coach at the track day was trying to help riders avoid the common error of braking (which compresses the forks) then releasing the brakes (which allows them to extend again) then turning the bike (which compresses them again). This bouncing up and down is, as you can imagine, counterproductive to accurate and predictable steering. In a simple corner the ideal scene is to be coming off the brakes as you are turning the bike, so the forces transfer from the deceleration forces to the cornering forces and keep the forks compressed instead of popping up and back down again. As far as telling you how exactly how much effect that is going to have, it is not realistic to think anyone can do that for you, there are far too many variables (suspension setup, rider and bike weight, braking style, steering input rate, surface traction, shape of turn, and so forth). You will have to experiment with it yourself, on your own bike and observe it. Almost certainly YES you can improve it with riding technique (have you been to school and had the Hook Turn material yet? Or the slow brake release classroom session?), unless your front suspension is extremely stiff in compression or has rebound damping set excessively low. Definitely you can sharpen up the steering on a bike by lowering the front a bit, but if taken too far this can compromise stability and you can get headshake, or twitchiness in the steering. Not sure the GSXR750 would need much changing on geometry, though, my impression of those were that they had nice handling. In the specific turns you describe (T1 and T3), are you trying to turn the bike while still on the gas? For sure that will make it harder to steer. Are you ABLE to steer it now and just noticing the amount of effort required, or are you running wider than you want in those turns?
  14. 1 point
    The farther you get away for an object's center of mass, the more leverage you have. So lower bars would have less leverage. Also have a look at Newton's third law of motion and then decide what you mean by "load" and possibly rephrase.
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