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Showing most liked content since 04/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    I just did a track day, and during the day I got to thinking that I really need to start using my knee sliders and get comfortable using them. After a lot of big improvements in quick succession (suspension upgrades that gave much better feel & improved confidence, started using tyre warmers so I gun it into the first corner and don't waste time) I've found myself getting surprised the few times a knee slider touches down. Sometimes it's just because my inside leg bounces and the slider almost "slaps" the track over a bumpy section, other times it's just that I'm carrying that much lean angle. I've never focussed on getting my knee down, I've spent all my time working on other areas of my riding which is finally all coming together and paying off big time! Speed is not a problem, today was the first time I rode in the fastest group and I probably should have been there for a little while. I am probably the only person in the group that doesn't get knee down. But my riding style means that I don't have such an exaggerated "leg out" body position, in fact usually I pull my leg in towards the bike. So I'm never expecting it when the slider touches down and it has been catching me off guard, sometimes I actually check up and roll off the throttle slightly, which then puts me off and I loose the rhythm for the rest of the lap and a bit. So the question is - how do I go about getting used to using the knee sliders? Just keep doing what I'm doing... and try to get used to the feeling when it happens? It feels like I'm backwards with all this - usually people put all their effort into getting knee down to look cool, then focus on actually developing good riding technique - I went straight to the technique, "cool factor" be damned. Haha Has anyone else found themselves in this situation - being fast, but totally unfamiliar with getting your knee down?? Cheers for any ideas or suggestions!
  2. 1 point
    Perhaps we should have been discussing this instead. Only corollary that I could think of would be Garry McCoy’s sliding style of cornering, where he’d light up the rear, swinging the thing around the steering head. Caught a lot of flak until he won a GP race like that AND it was found that the tire was no worse for wear as only the top surface was heating up.
  3. 1 point
    Because all the gears and sprockets that link the crankshaft with the rear wheel act like a lever: the rotational speed of the rear wheel gets reduced while its applicable torque increases. For the same degree of openning of the throtle, resisting load and rpm's, the engine generates certain amount of torque or rotational force. We have to work around that more or less constant amount of torque, playing with the gears, just like it happens with a bicycle. For a greater resistive load (going uphill, for example), we have to sacrifice rotational speed of the rear wheel in order to have greater torque there; hence, we switch to lower gears. One trick for riding in the rain is to corner using a taller than normal gear, which "weakens" the available torque of the rear wheel, which creates an extra safety margin regarding any mistake with excessive throttle that could overwhelm the marginal available traction. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Tc3VIDQvh0
  4. 1 point
    Just so we are clear, I'm talking about higher rpm while already leaned over, which is not the same thing as having some throttle on while steering the bike. The bike feels more stable in the turn at higher rpm because the lean angle is set and it doesn't want to change because of the increased gyroscopic effect. For me on the S1000rr it can feel more stable at a higher rpm (lower gear) in a slow tight turn like the last few turns at Streets of Willow or Turn 9 at ACS, less reactive to rider movement or rough throttle inputs because the lean angle doesn't change as easily, and the more immediate throttle response when picking up the gas helps me to get better throttle control. Feeling a desire or need to have some throttle on when ENTERING a turn tells you something about your entry speed, do you remember what?
  5. 1 point
    Higher RPM in a corner does make a difference in motorcycle handling. Take a look at this article: https://www.msgroup.org/forums/mtt/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2182 There is also the effect of greater engine braking approaching the turn, which may have allowed you to shorten your braking distance, or use less brake and get a more accurate entry speed.
  6. 1 point
    This particular item, in my opinion, is a great example of something that is not a matter of who is right and wrong as much as what works for one rider versus another, depending on that riders bike and their physical build and flexibility. Different bikes have different rider handlebar heights and distance from the seat, different shaped tanks, different rearset heights and configurations, etc. and that all impacts how the rider can hang on, and hang off. Even if you just narrow it down to sportbikes, you can look at a Ducati gas tank versus a Yamaha gas tank and see that rider lock on will not be the same from one to the other. And of course, a 6'3" 180 lb rider would fit on a bike differently than a 5'1" 180 lb rider. You can go to any track day and see LOTS of riders hanging their butt WAYY off the seat, even riders who are riding at a slow pace in the beginner group. Very often you will ALSO see those riders propping themselves up with their inside arm, and/or crossing their head and upper body BACK over the tank to the other side, so they really aren't shifting any weight to the inside after all. (OK, gallery, what is wrong with propping yourself up with the inside arm?). Some riders are strong enough and flexible enough (and tall enough!) to find a position where they hang off more than half their butt, without causing any unwanted bar input, unstable lower body lock, or excess fatigue - but for MOST riders, half a butt cheek is a much better starting point to create a stable, functional and effective body position. At the school we have a great off track exercise where we put a rider on a bike and work with them one-on-one to find a body position that works for them, along with educating them along the way about what is important about body position - what is the point of hanging off, how to do it (if desired), and how to get a good, comfortable, solid position that works, and then practice it. Just like you say above - knowing not only what to do, but also understanding why.
  7. 1 point
    The bowl is FUUUUNNNN, seems like the best place to get more speed, at least compared to the others you mentioned. It is scary as hell trying to go faster where you crest that hill, where it is blind and off- camber! Which direction were you riding the track, CCW?
  8. 1 point
    The data loggers are absolutely incredible in what they do, and small and easy to mount. If you really are interested in one, contact the school office at 800-530-3350. Slicks are really expensive and tires are one of the biggest expenses involved in track riding. If the data logger helps you find the problem with your tire wear (or gives you the info you need to take to your suspension guy or tire guy), it will pay for itself very quickly. The additional riding info that you get that will improve your laptimes will just be a bonus! Edit - BTW if you have a friend that has one, too, you can download your data and compare, creating a "virtual race" type thing where you can overlay your laps and see the differences - where you or your friend is getting on the gas earlier, carrying more speed, braking later, etc., and you can use your combined positive points to improve each other's laptimes. Or just bench race. Anyway it is really great and I highly recommend it!
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