Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/12/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I notice that it is very hard to get the actual character of the track from seeing it on TV. Hard to perceive the elevation changes, hard to see the changes in camber and surface, and the abrupt changes in camera perspective can make it hard to grasp the flow of the track. I also notice that I am amazed by how much the bikes slide around, and wiggle under hard braking, and how rough some riders can be on the controls while others are silky smooth. When I watch videos (especially on-board videos) of amateur racers I am amazed by how many errors some riders make in races. Riders that are fast, judging by their laptimes, but make a lot of mistakes; it would seem surprising that they don't fall down more often - but then sometimes I find out they DO fall often. It certainly seems possible to pick up some incorrect ideas or not-useful information, for example I sometimes hear announcers throw out some thoughtless comment or platitude that is really not applicable and could be confusing if you tried to really take it seriously. On the other hand, seems like you could learn a lot about preparation and race strategy, tire wear management, and race rules by watching races, by seeing what happens to riders that are late to the grid, or overwork their tires in the first part or a race, or choose the right or wrong tire compound, I find that stuff quite interesting.
  2. 2 points
    If you Google "front tire chicken strips Dave Moss" he has a short and rather entertaining video that relates to this topic. (Dave Moss is a very respected suspension guy and knows a LOT LOT LOT about tires and tire wear.)
  3. 1 point
    A few years back there was some footage of Casey Stoner. He was out front, way ahead, in a fast corner, lost the front end...then it came back! The announcer was all over it, and half a lap later, they cut back to the camera that was his hand, facing back looking at him. When he lost the front, you could see him let go of the bars! That of course is what allowed the bike to recover. He had just enough pressure to keep the throttle on, but he hands visibly opened as the front tucked and recovered. Pretty cool. CF
  4. 1 point
    Why is that with current high performance tire sets that you fully reach the edge of the rear tire, there is still a half inch "chicken strip" remaining on the front tire? One would think you would reach the edge at the same lean angle. Thanks in advance. Greg D.
  5. 1 point
    This may be an oversimplification but I thought it was because the rear tire is wider than the front on the higher horsepower bikes. The effect is a lot less noticeable on smaller, lower HP bikes where the tire sizes are not as different front to back.
  6. 1 point
    Ha, 27 in a 60 year old body...I don't think I made it past about 18 in my emotional development...that or I've been in my mid-life crisis for about 30 years CF
  7. 1 point
    Hi Apollo, We have some good threads on tires, but I'll take a quick swing at this: The goal is to discover traction, not assume it--I'm not of the opinion that one should just "trust" the tires--find out how good they are working! This is harder to do on the front, easier to do on the rear. If the morning is cool/cold, (and let's assume no tire warmers) then you have to put heat in the tires, which builds from flexing the carcass, so heat comes from the inside out. So start easy, gradually increase the pace. Straight line accel and braking help a little to flex the carcass, but still needs both sides warmed, which is achieved by cornering and putting them on a load, gradually increasing that load. On a modern Dunlop slick, this can take 3 laps on even just a cool day, maybe more on a cold day, or very first ride. On some very cold days, they won't ever get to temp. If you have a good lock on the bike with the lower body (arms are not being used to support the body), the front will feel like it's a bowling ball, stiff and slippery, not "hooked up" at all. As it warms, you will feel more resistance, it's "biting" more and will track a tighter line once turned in. This is a super short comment, we have a lot of good data up here on tires, and cold tires too. Let me know if this helps, or you need any assistance finding more info. Best, Cobie
  8. 1 point
    The fronts don't get to the edge, on any of the bikes we've had for years. The rear will go all the way, the front always has a "chicken strip". That's a good question though, are there any bikes they do get to the edge, besides full race bikes (WSB or MotoGP). CF
  9. 1 point
    Hi gang! I'm Roberts, a 27 year old enthusiast trapped in a 60 year old body. It's not my fault. I blame it on time. with 40+ years of street and off-road riding, I was not surprised to find out I have a lot of flaws. What does surprise is how hard it is to overcome dangerous habits. It's my hope that work with CSS and crew, and inputs from all of you, will help me to fix my problems before they 'fix' me.
×
×
  • Create New...