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  1. 3 points
    Here is some info from Dylan that you might find interesting: Dunlop just released a new sportbike tire, the Q4. This tire is different from what many think it is. It is NOT an improved Q3+ but rather a whole new category of tire. Its purpose is to provide a street legal tire with excellent grip, no need for warmers, that is at home on the track or on your favorite twisty road. Essentially it fills the gap between the Q3+ and the street legal race tire, the GPA Pro. So the progression looks like this: Q3+. Best all purpose tire. Harder center band for commuting, with sides well suited for cornering. Q4. Best for trackdays and canyons/twisty roads. Warms fast, less sensitive to pressure settings. Single compound across entire tread. Any loss in overall mileage is gained in grip compared to Q3+. GPA Pro. Essentially a race slick with grooves. Warmers strongly recommended particularly when cool and pressures checked and set before riding. Street legal. Poor choice for commuting but good for twisty roads and very much at home on the track. Slicks. Pure track only tire. Warmers strongly recommended with pressures checked and set before riding.
  2. 3 points
    Most discussions of steering and "weight shift", "loading" and "helps it to steer" are riddled with illogic, and the people discussing will not reach a conclusion predicated on so many errors in thought. Rather, going to the basics of logic is the best way forward lest they get entangled permanently in confusions. Forums have become a popular platform to air ones flawed thought process, while other visitors try in vain to overhaul their whole logical approach to problem solving. Not saying I've got logic down myself, but some statements and articles have so many flaws, it's like: "where do we start?..." and just skip it. Remember when you have contrary facts, one or both are false. Some things to consider: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consistency https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Validity
  3. 2 points
  4. 2 points
  5. 2 points
    Good morning. A few co-workers and I are signed up for the May 26th CSS at Barber and this will be our first time going to this school. We will be using school gear and bikes as well. My question is to all of the veterans of the school out there. Is there anything that you wish you knew or knew to bring before you got there? If we have go pro's will there be mounts on the school bikes or helmets or are we allowed to even mount them? Coolers with drinks or will there be stuff there? How much spendy cash to bring (will there be shirts, ect. for sale)? You get the idea, anything useful that you can give to guys who will be attending for the first time. Thanks for your time. Jeff
  6. 2 points
    Realize that it is a SCHOOL, not a sales-pitch! The instructors are incredibly knowledgeable and when they are discussing technique, form, or common mistakes, it is not to sell you on their ideas or ways of riding. They are teaching you a new technique. You try it out, and if you do not like it, let the instructors know when you have your post ride meeting with them. Let them know what was uncomfortable. Chances are, they will spot it before you do and tell you exactly what to change or address. For me personally, my first school I went to, I loved it. I was so excited and ready and scared. I went in with an open mind and took it all in. There may be some people in your class that "argue" with the ideas or challenge the instructors based on their personal experiences. It can be frustrating because the instructors are there to teach, not to sell. They are offering a new perspective, new techniques, they are not trying to change you. They are not telling you this is the ONLY way to ride a bike. However, they have done their research, they show you the research, and they have proven techniques. It is up to you whether you leave the school and take the lessons with you! Go in with an absolutely open mind. If you go in with this approach, I guarantee you will enjoy it so much more and your riding will drastically improve!!!! Also, if and when a coach pulls you over on the track, do not take it personally. They are not mad at you, they are there to keep you and other riders safe. If they notice something dangerous, they will bring it up. Lastly, do not worry if you are slower than others in your class. You learn best when you ride at 75% of your ability. And sometimes with even less speed you can focus on your riding and the technique at hand. In summation... 1) Go in with an open mind. 2) Don't take it personally if you are "having a talkin' to" by one of the coaches. 3) Ride at a pace you are comfortable with, do not worry about the ability of others. Focus on you!
  7. 2 points
    Hey, this picture looks much better, hear head, neck and shoulders look more turned into the (imaginary) corner and more relaxed, your knee is more open to the right so your elbow looks less crowded, and the angle of your wrist looks more comfortable as well. Does it feel better? "Rotating around the tank" (not a desirable situation) is when you are sitting TOO close to the gas tank, so that when you try to shift your hips to the side to hang off, your upper thigh bumps into the tank and tends to force your hips to turn the WRONG way, so that instead of opening your hips into the corner, you end up twisting them away from the direction of the turn, which tends to pull your outside knee away from tank and mess up your lock-on. When you see riders with their butt hanging WAY off but their upper body crossed back over the tank and their head ending up in the middle or even the wrong side (and/or holding themselves up with a stiff inside arm) that is often the cause. The easiest way to understand it is to try it - scoot ALL the way forward so you are up against the tank. Then try scooting your hips to the side and see how the tank restricts your movement or forces you to twist the wrong way. Then try moving back a bit in the seat (typically about a fist size space between tank and crotch is a good starting point, might need to go back more if your legs are long) and try it again and see how much easier it is to move your hips over, and to rotate your hips the INTO the turn instead of the opposite. Let me know if that makes sense.
  8. 2 points
    It's a little hard to tell just seeing it from the back side so take this with a grain of salt, but it looks to me like you are hanging your butt/hips off just a little bit too far on the right versus the left. On the left side you look comfortable and secure, and you are rotating your hips a bit to the left (into the turn) which sets you up nicely to get your upper body and head low and off to the left. Comparatively, on the right side, it looks to me like you scoot your butt over farther, and can't rotate your hips as much into the corner, which seems to compromise the lock in of your outside knee and make it more awkward to get your upper body down and to the right. Some things to check: 1) Are you too close to the tank to be able to rotate your hips towards the inside of the corner? Try scooting back just a little and see if it makes it easier. 2) Can you lock in your outside (left) knee as solidly on right turns as you can your outside (right) knee of left hand turns? If not, try not moving your hips quite so far to the rights on your right turns, rotate your hips a little more to the inside (right hip more toward the rear of the bike), and see if that pushes your left knee more solidly into a lock position on the tank. 3) Have you attended a school and done the "hip flick" exercise from Level 3? Making a smooth, consistent movement of the hips without bouncing on the pegs or adding any bar input is a benefit of that drill. I know you said you are not holding onto the bars... but that would be one of the most common reasons for the bike feeling like it "wants to abruptly tip over", either during the transition or once hanging off - a really small amount of input can make a really big difference. One obvious thing that is different on rights versus lefts is that you have the throttle control in your right hand. Any chance that when you roll on the throttle you are putting some forward (steering) pressure on that right bar, causing the bike to lean over more (or faster) than you expect?
  9. 2 points
    Last year for my birthday, I redid L1 and the following day L2. I then turned around 2 weeks later and did L3, followed by L4. This year, again for my birthday on the same track I did L4 again. I rode the BMW S1000RR and had a blast! I didn't take lap times, but I could easily perceive my pace was quicker, smoother and safer since the last time I was at the circuit. I took a couple wins with me in that I realized at the consulting table with my peers that I went through the day and not once had a pucker moment. I had control over myself and the bike, even during the time when I blew my TP for T7. My other win was that I completed the day without the nagging of back pain that has come up over the years. I was able to use many of the L3 skills that I picked up and I also realized some areas where I can expand my new capabilities into and remove some old limitations. I can also say that I've had the pleasure of winding the S1000RR to WOT on the front and back straights. Maybe in the soon future, I'll be able to hold it there!
  10. 2 points
    The school will have pretty much everything you need available - sunscreen, earplugs, water, snacks, etc. However, at Barber some things you could end up wanting to have: a folding chair, for break times - there is seating in the classroom, but you might want to have a chair you can put somewhere in the shade for times between class and riding. A comfortable, cool layer to wear under your leathers, either an undersuit made for the purpose or something like UnderArmour pants and shirt. An underlayer makes it a LOT easier to get in and out of leathers, plus being cooler and more comfortable underneath. A regular cotton tshirt can get bunched up or wet under leathers and won't keep you as cool as UnderArmour or an undersuit. The school does have undersuits for sale, in limited size/quantity, you may want to call ahead to see if they can reserve one for you in your size and find out the price. Drinks of your own if you have a preference - keeping hydrated is important, it can get hot at Barber. The school will have water and Skratch (an electrolyte drink) available. If you want to run a Go Pro, mention it as you register in the morning to find out if it will be allowed and to leave time to arrange for mounting the camera. As far as money goes - there are plenty of things to buy, T shirts, caps, track decals, not to mention bike parts and Stomp grip, so how much to bring is up to you. Credit card is fine for purchases and you will need a credit card for your equipment deposit anyway, so you may just want to bring that instead of a bunch of cash. Also Barber museum is nearby, and a giant Bass Pro shop, so there are lots of places you can spend money if you're so inclined. Consider making time the day before or after your school to visit the Barber Museum, it is AMAZING.
  11. 2 points
    Nice post, Lnewqban. Jaybird, what is it that you are trying to fix or figure out? We know from riding our no BS bike at the school that you can get a bike to drift to one side by hanging weight off to one side - as Lnewqban addresses quite well above. But we also know that it is slow and imprecise, and anyone who has ridden the no BS bike recognizes immediately that they are not in control of the motorcycle when their hands are on the fixed bars. Given a slow enough speed and enough time and space to accomplish it, you can get the bike to turn, but it is hardly effective enough to get one around a racetrack or avoid an obstacle. You can see a clear demonstration of this in the Twist II DVD, you can see the effects of weight shift, how the the bike reacts and how the bars react. I'm not quite clear whether you are trying to address hanging weight off to the inside, or talking about weighting one peg without moving the Center of Mass, the effects are different. More importantly, what challenge are you facing in your riding that has you asking about this? (Or is it all just an academic dicussion ? )
  12. 2 points
    Higher RPM in a corner does make a difference in motorcycle handling. Take a look at this article: https://www.msgroup.org/forums/mtt/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2182 There is also the effect of greater engine braking approaching the turn, which may have allowed you to shorten your braking distance, or use less brake and get a more accurate entry speed.
  13. 2 points
    This particular item, in my opinion, is a great example of something that is not a matter of who is right and wrong as much as what works for one rider versus another, depending on that riders bike and their physical build and flexibility. Different bikes have different rider handlebar heights and distance from the seat, different shaped tanks, different rearset heights and configurations, etc. and that all impacts how the rider can hang on, and hang off. Even if you just narrow it down to sportbikes, you can look at a Ducati gas tank versus a Yamaha gas tank and see that rider lock on will not be the same from one to the other. And of course, a 6'3" 180 lb rider would fit on a bike differently than a 5'1" 180 lb rider. You can go to any track day and see LOTS of riders hanging their butt WAYY off the seat, even riders who are riding at a slow pace in the beginner group. Very often you will ALSO see those riders propping themselves up with their inside arm, and/or crossing their head and upper body BACK over the tank to the other side, so they really aren't shifting any weight to the inside after all. (OK, gallery, what is wrong with propping yourself up with the inside arm?). Some riders are strong enough and flexible enough (and tall enough!) to find a position where they hang off more than half their butt, without causing any unwanted bar input, unstable lower body lock, or excess fatigue - but for MOST riders, half a butt cheek is a much better starting point to create a stable, functional and effective body position. At the school we have a great off track exercise where we put a rider on a bike and work with them one-on-one to find a body position that works for them, along with educating them along the way about what is important about body position - what is the point of hanging off, how to do it (if desired), and how to get a good, comfortable, solid position that works, and then practice it. Just like you say above - knowing not only what to do, but also understanding why.
  14. 2 points
    The bowl is FUUUUNNNN, seems like the best place to get more speed, at least compared to the others you mentioned. It is scary as hell trying to go faster where you crest that hill, where it is blind and off- camber! Which direction were you riding the track, CCW?
  15. 2 points
    The data loggers are absolutely incredible in what they do, and small and easy to mount. If you really are interested in one, contact the school office at 800-530-3350. Slicks are really expensive and tires are one of the biggest expenses involved in track riding. If the data logger helps you find the problem with your tire wear (or gives you the info you need to take to your suspension guy or tire guy), it will pay for itself very quickly. The additional riding info that you get that will improve your laptimes will just be a bonus! Edit - BTW if you have a friend that has one, too, you can download your data and compare, creating a "virtual race" type thing where you can overlay your laps and see the differences - where you or your friend is getting on the gas earlier, carrying more speed, braking later, etc., and you can use your combined positive points to improve each other's laptimes. Or just bench race. Anyway it is really great and I highly recommend it!
  16. 2 points
    That’s ironic you link the wiki article. I have read it. they describe countersteering by weight shifting and being able to initiate turns by making the bike lean right or left through peg weighting. You may not change the center of mass very much, but the fact that bike is now leaned, it induces the front wheel to swivel and create the countersteering input. ‘They point out that the movement is minor the heavier the vehicle is, but might this be what is best in the middle of a turn to hold a line if needed? its not that I don’t believe in countersteering, it obviously is the most effective way of getting to your lean angle quickly. I just wanted input on how much weight I should have on the seat vs crouching on the pegs. Now that you’ve made it somewhat clear, I can make my adjustments. i went out for a ride and found a nice feeling of stability cornering when firmly seated on the bike. And I was surprised at how much I was actually squatting on the pegs before and how hard it was to break the habit the faster I entered. I still felt like I wanted to be up on the pegs as it felt I was in better control of the bike, but I know this is not my goal. Maybe it’s a survival reaction, like I’m ready to jump off if I slide. Lol. my goal is to be in position before the corner. Enter the corner firmly seated in good position to apply the initial countersteering input. Get to my lean angle without moving my body position around to upset the bike. Then, pick up the apex and apply gradual throttle to settle the suspension, then the exit point, maybe at this point move the upper body or weight the outer peg or counter steer to get the bike up and out of the lean.
  17. 2 points
    Hi All Thanks for letting me join in. Had a look at some of the chats and lots of quality info in here. Made the trip over to California a couple of years ago to do levels 1 & 2 at Willow Springs - and it was epic! Excited about coming back over this October for some more of your amazing weather and to find out how truly awful I've become at turning left and right on a bike ;-) (just kidding coaches!) Looking forward to picking up good tips here and hopefully I can contribute along the way too...
  18. 2 points
    Do you have a copy of Twist of the Wrist II? Chapter 19, Pivot Steering, goes into specific detail about weight distribution on the seat and pegs, explains what to do, how to do it, and why, with specific explanations and examples of the effects on the bike. It's far more complete and informative than what could be typed here. Take a look at that if you can and let us know what you think, or if you have any additional questions! BTW, if you are like me and want answers as fast as possible, Twist of the Wrist II is available as an e-book now, here is a link to it on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Twist-Wrist-II-High-Performance-Motorcycle-ebook/dp/B00F8IN5K6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461194283&sr=8-1&keywords=twist+of+the+wrist+II+kindle
  19. 1 point
    Not only is this very entertaining, it gave me some good ideas to share with my son for next year's science project!
  20. 1 point
    I've only seen the Woodcraft ones in use, they seemed to work well for the purpose, and they were fairly thick. I haven't tried them myself but the person that was using them got them because he didn't like the sound or sensation of scraping standard pucks. I presume they wouldn't last as long as standard pucks if you dragged them a lot, but his were holding up fine. I have seen a few creative ideas - one person took a couple of stiff plastic zip ties and fed them through the Velcro under the knee puck so they stuck out like curb feelers, to try to touch those down. Not sure if he actually took that out on track or whether it worked, but I did think it was creative. :)
  21. 1 point
    You are welcome, Jaybird What you have been analyzing and trying to understand is very complex dynamics, reason for which most riders don't even bother learning the "why" of these things. The books that explain the whole interconnection of steering, wheels, masses, forces, etc. in a motorcycle are very dense to read and difficult to comprehend. I believe that there is value in understanding the basics of the Physics behind riding a motorcycle in a proficient way. It is difficult to explain those principles to inexperienced riders without going too deep into the subject and causing confusion. Most mentoring/teaching is limited to "do this to achieve that and go practice it". The experienced rider has the advantage of having tested what works and what does not, of having felt those forces and the reactions of the machines during enough time to make sense of those principles. If serious about this, by persistent observation during thousand of miles, an educated rider becomes more aware and more sensitive about the dynamics of riding and develops a finer input of all the controls and sense of balance. The Physics then becomes less abstract and more in harmony with our senses and minds. In order to function as a motorcycle rather than as a bag of potatoes, all the forces and moments acting over a motorcycle in different directions must be in balance. If our control inputs or road conditions break that balance, a brief transition period follows, during which the machine does its magic to self-adjust to a new state of balance. If that state is not physically achievable, a fall will follow. Counter-steering is a clear example of that: the rider intentionally steers the bike out of balance (out of its rectilinear path), inducing many reactive forces, movements and moments for a very brief period of time, forcing the machine into a new state of balance (onto a curvilinear path). If the machine continues on in one of the two states of balance, the rider is doing nothing or too little to modify those, like it happens in the No BS bike demonstration. If the machine is upset by incorrect control inputs from the rider, like closing the throttle during a big rear tire slide, the machine can go from stable cornering balance to unstable transition to out of balance (highside fall) really quick. The speed of the motorcycle is very influential about the steering, gyroscopic reactive forces, rolling and balance, reason for which counter-steering is so powerful in a superbike at high speeds, but almost negligible for a trial bike at walking speeds. http://www.dynamotion.it/eng/dinamoto/8_on-line_papers/effetto giroscopico/Effettigiroscopici_eng.html
  22. 1 point
    That’s all I’m trying to do, too. but all this talk of logic and reasoning is giving me a headache. let me ask you something. how does one know who is right and who is wrong? If mathematics cannot fully explain the way a motorcycle steers, what makes someone so sure they are right and others are wrong? I agree that much of the internet is a big wasteland of misinformation. I am a professional by training and (like, you) spent some considerable time in secondary education after high school (13years for me, yikes!). I am not unfamiliar with textbooks and classroom and learning. Last 5 years were in hands on training learning my craft, I am not unfamiliar with the physical aspect of acquiring new skills. While I would no sooner tell someone to go to any internet forum for information I trained in, I realize that if carefully selected, there IS a place to look for this information. I am also grateful for any information I can glean. Just wish it wasn’t so shrouded in mystery sometimes.
  23. 1 point
    Hey all! I will be at Arizona Motorsports Park Sunday March 24th. I plan on bringing my CBR and my newly acquired S1000RR! Please come by, say hi, review Twist of the Wrist II with me, plan different attack lines, and mostly have fun with me and my friends! We bring lots of food!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So come eat.
  24. 1 point
    MOTORRAD tested a ZX-7R (so a long time ago) stock and with 4 inch riser. Eveybody went significantly faster through the slalom tests with the taller bars. The less experienced riders gained more than the experienced racer. After doing a ton of laps, pushing himself to his limits, the racer finally managed to set the fastest time around the race track with the stock bars - it was a pride thing for him - but it took a lot more effort to ride with the lower handlebars. Take a look at the handlebars used in the early Superbikes AMA days. Pretty tall and especially wide to gain leverage. Now look at the handlebars of Kenny Schwantz' RG500. That's a bike only 285 lb light, yet Kevin still had wide and tall bars compared to most of his competitors. In my humble opinion, you would love moving the handlebars up.
  25. 1 point
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