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Cobie Fair

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Cobie Fair last won the day on July 16

Cobie Fair had the most liked content!

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About Cobie Fair

  • Rank
    Chief Riding Coach World Wide
  • Birthday 09/30/1960

Contact Methods

  • AIM
    don't have one any more
  • MSN
    same
  • Website URL
    http://superbikeschool.com
  • ICQ
    0
  • Yahoo
    same

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    La Crescenta
  • Interests
    The School and training riders keeps me pretty busy. I like action pistol shooting, woodworking, welding, dirt bike riding, hanging with my kids.

Previous Fields

  • Have you attended a California Superbike School school?
    1982 was the first one

Recent Profile Visitors

44,278 profile views
  1. In Level 1 we have a Steering Drill, that if properly done (can't usually be done in the wet), should be able to help this issue. As Apollo said, sometimes a trained external eye can help. If you can't get to a school, we'll see if we can offer a suggestion.
  2. 3A, off camber slippery turn that then crests and goes down hill, on a cold morning that was damp...after sitting too long on the grid--everything against you on that one. Have you done the school and taken the class that has the Pick Up technique? It was in Level 2 for a long time, now in Level 3 (we have a braking exercise in L-2 in that spot now). CF
  3. A few years back there was some footage of Casey Stoner. He was out front, way ahead, in a fast corner, lost the front end...then it came back! The announcer was all over it, and half a lap later, they cut back to the camera that was his hand, facing back looking at him. When he lost the front, you could see him let go of the bars! That of course is what allowed the bike to recover. He had just enough pressure to keep the throttle on, but he hands visibly opened as the front tucked and recovered. Pretty cool. CF
  4. Ha, 27 in a 60 year old body...I don't think I made it past about 18 in my emotional development...that or I've been in my mid-life crisis for about 30 years CF
  5. Hi Apollo, We have some good threads on tires, but I'll take a quick swing at this: The goal is to discover traction, not assume it--I'm not of the opinion that one should just "trust" the tires--find out how good they are working! This is harder to do on the front, easier to do on the rear. If the morning is cool/cold, (and let's assume no tire warmers) then you have to put heat in the tires, which builds from flexing the carcass, so heat comes from the inside out. So start easy, gradually increase the pace. Straight line accel and braking help a little to flex the carcass, but still needs both sides warmed, which is achieved by cornering and putting them on a load, gradually increasing that load. On a modern Dunlop slick, this can take 3 laps on even just a cool day, maybe more on a cold day, or very first ride. On some very cold days, they won't ever get to temp. If you have a good lock on the bike with the lower body (arms are not being used to support the body), the front will feel like it's a bowling ball, stiff and slippery, not "hooked up" at all. As it warms, you will feel more resistance, it's "biting" more and will track a tighter line once turned in. This is a super short comment, we have a lot of good data up here on tires, and cold tires too. Let me know if this helps, or you need any assistance finding more info. Best, Cobie
  6. Hi Roberts, We had 6 great days up there...that track is becoming one of the staff favorites! Start any time with the questions :). Best, Cobie
  7. The fronts don't get to the edge, on any of the bikes we've had for years. The rear will go all the way, the front always has a "chicken strip". That's a good question though, are there any bikes they do get to the edge, besides full race bikes (WSB or MotoGP). CF
  8. OK pollsters, here is another look at this area, and question for you (and any others that have not chimed in) this could be considered the same question (or similar), but going to ask anyway: What single skill would you most like to improve in your own riding? CF
  9. Hearing the engine, just to be clear, is that for when to shift?
  10. Comfortable for you is a key issue. In this photo, one problem is with the foot on the end of the peg, it reduces ground clearance by a lot, should be up and out of the way, not dragging prematurely. CF
  11. OK, to move on to the next point, and that is one's attention, and where does it get put/get used/consumed. Keith has covered this well in Twist 1, with his $10 bill analogy. One thing that surprises me is how few riders new to the track use ear plugs, and for the simple reason of reducing distraction. What types of things do you guys do/use to have more free attention for riding? Let's hear 'em. (Should we do a new thread for this?) CF
  12. I laugh every time I see your avatar...
  13. This is great stuff, all of you. I do hope we get a little more on this, either confirmations of the above or any other views (if you haven't yet chimed in, please do). CF
  14. If you ride a street bike, interested in what you think: Of the following skills/abilities (or another not listed) what do you rank as the highest priority as a rider? Ability to steer quickly Brave Visual skill, lack of target fixation Quick reflexes Physical condition, strength Interested in all skill levels response to this short survey, so if you ride a motorcycle, you can answer. Best, Cobie
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