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stapleking

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About stapleking

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  • Have you attended a California Superbike School school?
    yes
  1. Will, I'm still confused; when Keith and you say the gyroscopic progression doesn't "DO" much, what do you mean "do"? Seems to me, to lean [turn] the motorcycle one must overcome the resistance [gyroscopic effect] of the bike to move from the vertical plane. The more gyroscope, the harder it will be to do this, i.e. more push on the bars. That's what overcomes the bike's tedency to remain upright - opposite lock push on the bars to force the bike to "fall in". Ergo, the amount of force required is proportional to the amount of gyroscopic effect [rotational mass]. It "does" a great deal........
  2. I read with interest Keith's recent missive regarding gyroscopic effect of wheels on a bike. He suggests, at least as far as the front wheel of a Kaw Z6R is concerned, there is little "effect" on turn-in. I'm not sure that's right. For one thing, his admittedly inexact experiment doesn't seem to me to be measuring turn-in [or resistance thereto]. The gyroscope effect of the wheels turning in the fore/aft direction is to resist falling, or turning, in the lateral one. The less mass one has rotating in the one direction, the less will be the resistance to turning [falling] in the other aligned 90 degrees to the direction of rotation. That is why great attention is paid to things like wheel/tire weight, other unsprung rotational masses, rotational masses in the motor, and so forth. For example, everybody recognizes the benefit of lighter wheels; fewer understand that removing the charging system in the motor and lightening up the rotating drive line componetry has a similar effect. Anecdotally, I can certainly attest to the dramatic improvement in turn-in quickness I experienced with my Buell when I put lighter forged wheels, removed the charging system, and fabricated a belt drive primary with dry clutch. Yes, some of the effect I noticed was most certainly due to overall reduction in bike weight, but the difference was too dramatic to be only that; I believe some of the improvement was reduced gyro effect. So, Whaddaya' think boys 'n girls???
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