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faffi

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faffi last won the day on April 5

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About faffi

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  1. You could add the surprise with å flashing lamp. No lamp, go straight or into å gentle corner, lamp turned on, turn hard. Even better if you could have lamps for left and right, and nothing for straight on. Light must come on almost too late.
  2. What spring to mind is a big space with a painted corner outline, but with tons of runoff. Each rider could then charge the corner, based on their own limitations, with no risk of crashing while going too fast to (belive they can) make the corner. By always adding enough speed to maintain this "I cannot make this " you should hopefully have a similar training situation to that of the airplane.
  3. - and keep track of your suspension. Or so say him
  4. Compare video above to these
  5. I will admit I was surprised to see how minute the movement of the triple tree is in this video during change of direction.
  6. I find it easy to do (with the front brake and throttle) on the road, but not sure my brain could cope when riding at the very limit.
  7. One of my current bikes is a 1999 Honda NT650V Deauville. I have put the rear preload on max, which raised the static ride height by 40 mm. Up front, I have raised the oil level by 5 mm to 115 mm from the top and raised the front 20 mm through extra preload. It handles like a bike much lighter than its 530 lbs wet weight would suggest - I will claim that it steers quicker with less effort than my MT07. After raising it, the 150/70-17 Michelin PR4 will erase any trace of chicken strips before anything touches down. The 110/70-17 Michelin Pilot Street front has about 3 mm of chicken strips left, at which point the short peg feelers scrape hard enough to fold the pegs noticeably upwards. Still, by looking at the tires and also judging the sensation of lean, I would say that the bike heal over satisfactorily for a street bike. However. Cornering speed is unusually low. As an example, today I went through a long sweeper with the peg feeler screeching while doing an indicated 55 mph. As a comparison, the MT07 will take the same corner at 70 with nothing touching down. Same with the GSX600F Katana I owned some years ago. In fact, I could do over 50 mph on my Intruder 1400, a bike not famous for its cornering abilities. This repeats itself around just about any type of corner. And before I upped the preload, it would scrape doing 40 around a corner my CB400SF take at 65 mph with seemingly tons in reserve, although I had reached my personal limit. Finally, the question; what in your opinion could be causing this bike to lean far and corner slow?
  8. Rob, the bloke in the green leather suit with IXS on the back, was 56 when this video was shot.https://youtu.be/HawNynxsn7Y?t=146
  9. They even do it in the wet 😱 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXjdMESA4w0
  10. For me, it's roundabouts, because I always fear a lack of traction, plus studded tires dig tracks that usually must be traversed. Other than that, I agree with Vic above. Of the more impressive stuff I see regarding cornering at the upper level is the final two corners of Le Mans taken as one by MotoGP riders.
  11. Interesting! The third video may also show why quick steering is so beneficial since it allows the choice of a more efficient line. It also explained how one rider could corner at a given speed around a corner, fully decked out, while another can go faster and barely graze a peg feeler; different lines around the corner that require different amounts of lean for the same speed. Thanks for clarifying that. BTW, you may want to check your tags as I get a lot of animal video suggestions when watching yours, but nothing relevant.
  12. Trying to find whether the smaller bikes corner faster - or not - I found this: https://www.cycleworld.com/sport-rider/motogp-extreme-lean and
  13. It may be that I am confusing things here, and if so I apologize, but I do not see anything in your explanation that counter what I wrote? But since tires have width, bikes (combined with rider) must lean further than 45 degrees in order to obtain 1G. The wider the tire, the more extra lean is needed. Also as a result of tire width, center of gravity comes into play; the lower it is, the more one must lean for any given cornering speed. Finally, again due to the tires, length matter, with longer wheelbases needed extra lean. Finally, since a rider can influence the combined lean, the influence will be greater the lighter the bike and the heavier the rider. So a very light, short bike with narrow tires and a rider hanging well off to the inside can reach this 1G limit at a shallower bike lean angle than a heavy, long bike with wide tires. And I would expect the Moto2 to sit somewhere between the MotoGP and Moto3 bikes, albeit closer to the former, meaning bike lean should end up somewhere between the two for a Moto2 bike.
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