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Keith Code

Cult Of Force

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A major news story drove me to the dictionary to clear up an often used word in our culture, the word was 'cult' and I discovered both you and I are 'cult' members. The word itself stems from a Latin root and means: to cultivate, refine or improve and: to worship, admire or honor. The word's true meaning perfectly describes our sport. While riding itself can be broken down into only two main categories of action (changing SPEED and changing DIRECTION) the immediate and direct result of doing either of them is FORCE. Rider control changes produce forces like braking, acceleration, cornering and steering. Without these forces riding would be a dull activity indeed. In terms of riding skill, you are a good rider if you can handle the various forces generated by speed and direction changes and if you cannot, you aren't, period. Greetings fellow Cult of Force members, you greedy devils and welcome to The California Superbike School's web site, an official cult publication!.

 

We worship FORCE and it is packaged nicely for us by the manufacturers. We've prayed for and were promised direct, hot-wired, carbon/titanium spiritual enlightenment through track proven, saint tested technological advancements and all of our prayers were answered. Each refinement is the manufacturer's way of proving he can put you in control of more force than his competitor: lighter weight, stiffer frames, bigger brakes, adjustable suspension - every single techno-advance puts you in a state of grace with FORCE.

 

In the news story, the group had supposedly ignited themselves in flame. Our cult burns the incense of Hydrocarbons, we ignite the holy vapors up to 28,000 times per minute (14,000 RPM X 2 power pulses per rev.): Plus, we seek communion with both the corporate and credit gods and by the grace of being devoted consumers are only crucified indirectly by the news media when general rape and pillage is at a low level and the masses need a little churning. Make no mistake, you are a cult member by the true definition of the word.

 

Force, like immortality and Nirvana, is fascinating stuff. In racing, the guy who controls it best for the day wins. Top racers carry, each in his own way, personal force and it is visible in their style and conduct. At race time there is an intensity and energy present on the starting line quite different from normal life. Riders are in their own special preparatory frame of mind--to do what?: To control and confront Force. In street riding, a good rider is simply someone who can determine potential Forces or Force generating situations which would be contrary to his survival, for example; a new rider incorrectly sees dozens of cars in an urban traffic situation whereas an experienced one sees only those who are most likely to get him. New racers try for maximum braking Force, the veteran goes for cornering speed Force; the first takes little skill the second requires much.

 

The icons of our cult are simple and easy to read. One sees how his fellows pray by how and where they 'kneel' to the force gods. No longer are we easily impressed by what is ridden, (most modern sportbikes cry-out Tamed Force from every machined and fabricated surface) but how it is ridden. Footpeg, knee-puck and side tire wear tell how deeply the devotee partakes of our cult sacraments: the scuffs, scrapes and feathered side rubber from conquered forces, or the fractured plastic of triumphant ones, are worn proudly up and down our two-lane tabernacles as proof of personal enlightenment.

 

The Forces can be controlled and he who can do it is revered for that ability. There are at least eleven important riding decisions that come into play in each turn and each of those eleven items are directly connected to controlling and directing the forces of cornering: Where you downshift and brake, where and how you release the brake, how much entry speed, where throttle starts, how quick you get it on, how much lean, where the bike is pointed at full lean, where it will wind up at turn's end, how many (if any) in turn steering corrections, how quick you will steer it. Let's do our catechism. The two things that most affect those eleven points are: (1) the mechanical limits of your bike: tires, suspension, weight, power characteristics etc., and (2) your Turn Entry Steering Point.

 

A Turn Point is a magical and mystical thing. I've asked thousands of riders this question, "Where does a turn start"?, I can recall about 5 getting it right. Where does one start? At your Turn Entry Point, at the place you begin to turn, the spot where you begin your steering input; that is the beginning of a turn, nowhere else. Any turn, therefore, has an infinity of possible entrance points or Turn Points and each of the above eleven items directly hinge on it. The accuracy with which a top rider like Foggarty or Corser religiously execute their Turn Points is awesome, often varying only an inch or two, if at all, from lap to lap! Street riders are lazy with Turn Points and generally let the turn control their entries where a pro picks his spot and works from there to solve the problems of riding.

 

To use Force of any kind one must have a definite location to apply it from. The fun and challenge of a turn starts at your Turn Point. Begin finding Turn Points in your every day riding and move out of the ranks of sinners and onto the path of enlightenment. In our cult, being seduced by force is the ultimate salvation and once you see the light on Turn Points the gods of Force will smile on you. Uncontrolled force will blow your focus on riding and the result is fear. In fact, fear could be defined as: Expecting an uncontrollable force will act against you. Fun is: Predicting and successfully controlling force. Turn Points allow you to predict all eleven of the above important decisions. So brothers and sisters, for those of you who've lost their way, find the Path with Turn Points. You are always welcome to write to brother Code with your problems.

 

? 1997 Keith Code

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I'am proud to say I'am a new cult member I have eaten up all the tread side to side on my tires from canyon carving can't really get into the stunt scene(I'd rather highside a corner than wreck sitting on my windshield doing a wheelie), but I do some wicked wheelies but thats all you need in my book.To me it's all about when your taking a 70mph turn with a cliff on the side that you don't know where the bottom is. And I'am proud to say I have furthered my cult membership by receiving the roadracers bible thats what I call it. If you don't know you should it is TWIST OF THE WRIST 2. I got it for my 27th bithday and never in my life have I read a book that I can't put down the only time I want to put it down is at the end of the chapter, so I can jump on my bike and try it out.I admit I have a problem I am a speed and force cult memeber and I love it! Keith you are a truly blessed cult leader.

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I thought I was the only one that did crazy sh!t like hanging corners on the dangerous public streets of America.

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What timing. I'd been reading TOTWII trying to pinpoint why my turning technique was all balled up. The light turned last week when I started selecting a turning point, instead of drifting and reacting. Applying counterpressure on the outside bar made it possible. Hit the turn point, released that pressure and 'voila, the bike turned in on my intended line. Before that, I found myself drifting toward the inside, making what would otherwise be manageable turns impossibly tight. No doubt that there is much more to work on, but at least I think I'm heading in the right direction.

 

Keith, thanks for the help. I look forward to attending the August class.

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