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acebobby

What Riding Goals Are You Working On

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I am starting this thread based on something written by fossilfuel in a different thread!

Hope you dont mind fossilfuel but I didn't want to change the subject of that other thread!

You have written "I have attained every goal I set for myself in riding. I am setting new goals now and I am in the best shape of my life. So, for me, the reward has greatly out weighed the risk".

I find that sentence inspiring, and it got me wondering how do you set these goals and what are they? are they based on improved laptimes or is specific areas of riding you are aiming to improve?

this question is to everyone on the forum, what are your current riding goals and how are you going about achieving them?

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I have some general riding goals. I think if I can keep improving on the first 2, I'll have fun and get faster (which is fun). And these are things I can continually improve, so they're long term:

1. more relaxed on the bike

2. smoother inputs

3. faster (on the track- not when I'm commuting).

 

However, I don't focus on these when I'm actually at the track. I keep these in mind as the "big-picture goals." To actually work on them, I realize I need to find more specific, shorter-term, attainable goals. So when I'm actually at the track, I focus on there specific, attainable goals. For example:

 

a. better lock on my left leg going in turn 6 (helps goal 1 above, allowing my upper body to be light on the bars and relaxed). Once you get a good lock on the leg, it's locked and that's as good as it gets, so it's attainable that session.

b. slower release of the brake lever in turn 2 (smoother inputs)

 

When I'm riding for fun on the street, I do keep the big picture goals in mind and ask myself if I'm relaxed and smooth. When I'm commuting, I have one main goal - not get killed, and one secondary goal - get there soon. These obviously compete, since I don't spend all my time riding 10 MPH ;).

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Good idea briang. Breaking the goals down into bite size bits when you're at the track.

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It is really helpful for me to write down my goals in the morning, then again at lunch and revist at day's end. It also helps when you are doing a two day or more CSS event. I found that the goals I had in the morning like 'improving my hip flick' were best improved by practicing the foundation of throttle control and quick turn.

 

In the CSS curriculum, everything builds from Level I and improving that base translates quickly to gains in more advanced techniques. What I initially was working toward was not at all what needed improvement. A journal or near real-time diary after each class and debriefing is critical for me.

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... what are your current riding goals and how are you going about achieving them?

This is a great question. One of my goals was to be able to get around the track at a decent speed with a good "flow", doing the things I know to do deliberately yet without having to over-think everything. My goal is to be fast enough that no one can pass me!

 

I don't have a way to measure lap times, so I don't know how consistent I really am. They mentioned they set up a beacon- I need to look into what type of gadget uses that and how it works.

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Hi acebobby, good to see you on here keeping the discussion going! I think you've got a great question here: "what are your current riding goals and how are you going about achieving them?"

 

Perhaps it was meant for other students, but hope you don't mind if a coach pops in. First off, my goals change depending on what I assess is going well and what I believe can be improved. For example, body position had been an issue I focused on for a good amount of time previously, but I now find myself focusing on the more fundamental elements of riding. The catalyst for this shift in focus was my racing. To drop times, I needed to do a couple things:

-get the optimal entry speed into corners (by finding RP's for braking, downshifting and a turn point)

-get on the gas sooner once the bike was turned.

-in order to get on the gas sooner, I needed to get my turning done sooner (quick turn)

-once turned, I needed to roll on the gas smoothly but stronger (throttle control)

 

Of course, working on everything all the time in every corner is a lot harder than focusing on the one major out point, right? So in the five minutes after a ride session at a practice day, I think about what stood out to me and do a little self-diagnosis. What stood out from the session, or in other words, where was my attention focused? If it was on the entry of a particular corner, then I'll look at my visual skills in that corner (am I getting target fixed? What skills sort that out?), etc.

 

Thanks for the stimulating question. I look forward to reading more answers on it!

 

Kristi

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I don't have a way to measure lap times, so I don't know how consistent I really am. They mentioned they set up a beacon- I need to look into what type of gadget uses that and how it works.

 

There are a couple ways to do this, some bikes have simple lap timers built into them (My 2006 Kawi ZX-6R does, for example) but it generally requires the rider to press a button each time they cross the start/finish line.

 

Next, there are lap timer/transponders that you can purchase your own beacon for. You set up your beacon at the start/finish line, or any stationery spot around the track so that each time you pass it, it trips your on-board transponder and records 1 lap completed. Be careful as some beacon/transponders are infrared, which requires essentially a "line of sight" between the beacon and the transponder which cannot be obstructed by fairings or bring walls or people, otherwise the lap won't be counted.

 

Then there are systems such as the AMB transponder unit. It's also an on-board transponder that you can tuck under your bike's tail section or strap to the swing arm, or place anywhere (obstructions are okay) and the track organizer must have an AMB beacon at start/finish which will trip the transponder and record your time. Most major track day organizations that I know of use this system. The track day organizers may print out your times and post them there at the track.

 

At the Superbike School, for a small fee, they will strap a transponder to your bike and record your lap times for you. At the end of the day you will receive a print out. Lap times are a great way to track your progress, hope you have luck in finding the right system for you.

 

The unit I personally use is AMB.

 

Kristi

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While we're in the off season, I commute to work, and work on some weak points on some corners. I have a huge sweeper, and some tight turns leading me the first mile away from my house.

I'm working all summer (seemingly endlessly) at getting weight off the bars, keeping speed while going into corners, and my new favorite in BP, OPENING MY HIPS TO THE TURN!! It's a great feeling, and whether it makes me faster or not, I won't know until the tracks open back up, but I feel much more comfortable going into corners.

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I'm working all summer (seemingly endlessly) at getting weight off the bars, keeping speed while going into corners, and my new favorite in BP, OPENING MY HIPS TO THE TURN!! It's a great feeling, and whether it makes me faster or not, I won't know until the tracks open back up, but I feel much more comfortable going into corners.

 

So here is a question for you Hubbard....? Have you found that by opening your hips to the turn, it has helped with anything else as a reciprocal benefit...?

 

Bullet

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Hi acebobby, good to see you on here keeping the discussion going! I think you've got a great question here: "what are your current riding goals and how are you going about achieving them?"

 

Perhaps it was meant for other students, but hope you don't mind if a coach pops in. First off, my goals change depending on what I assess is going well and what I believe can be improved. For example, body position had been an issue I focused on for a good amount of time previously, but I now find myself focusing on the more fundamental elements of riding. The catalyst for this shift in focus was my racing. To drop times, I needed to do a couple things:

-get the optimal entry speed into corners (by finding RP's for braking, downshifting and a turn point)

-get on the gas sooner once the bike was turned.

-in order to get on the gas sooner, I needed to get my turning done sooner (quick turn)

-once turned, I needed to roll on the gas smoothly but stronger (throttle control)

 

Of course, working on everything all the time in every corner is a lot harder than focusing on the one major out point, right? So in the five minutes after a ride session at a practice day, I think about what stood out to me and do a little self-diagnosis. What stood out from the session, or in other words, where was my attention focused? If it was on the entry of a particular corner, then I'll look at my visual skills in that corner (am I getting target fixed? What skills sort that out?), etc.

 

Thanks for the stimulating question. I look forward to reading more answers on it!

 

Kristi

 

Hi Kristi,

Yeah of course this question is for everyone, students and coaches, it interests me to know how people go about improving their riding, and it seems as though for every riding problem there is a CSS drill you can work on to overcome that problem no matter what level your at from trackday novice, to coaches, to pro racers!

The reason I asked about goals is that I realised that when track riding (especially people on this forum), you are never content, there is never a point when you think ok, I am as fast as I want to be, so I will just stick at this level! Everyone always wants to improve some aspect of their riding!

 

At the moment I am working on body position alot, since I recently did my level 3 it has completely changed my riding style and I feel as though my bike fits me so much better, Its a new thing for me though as before L3 I never used the hang off style so its something I will be focusing on for a while I think!

 

Bobby

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I started 2009 with a goal and a result (I think, I got those words right- LOL). Sadly both have fallen short.

 

I had a goal of 3 school days and 6 trackdays (minimum). Each of the school dates would count as a trackday for the purposes of my goal. I made 2 days with CSS in March and haven't been on track since :-(

 

My desired result is to move up a level in my trackday org. I haven't had a chance to practice what I learned at CSS nor demonstrate that I even learned anything (my bad).

 

Hopefully, I'll get back on track before this season is out, but I don't expect any miracles. Perhaps 2010...

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I'm working all summer (seemingly endlessly) at getting weight off the bars, keeping speed while going into corners, and my new favorite in BP, OPENING MY HIPS TO THE TURN!! It's a great feeling, and whether it makes me faster or not, I won't know until the tracks open back up, but I feel much more comfortable going into corners.

 

So here is a question for you Hubbard....? Have you found that by opening your hips to the turn, it has helped with anything else as a reciprocal benefit...?

 

Bullet

Mostly comfort. It looks to be a big "missing link" to getting to the BP I want. Open the hips, lean forward seems to be working real well. I'm hoping it helps with my pivot steering, as my outside leg seems easier to lock into the tank. I'm also struggling with maintaining speed into a corner, which really adds time to my laptimes, but once I get through the school, I think it will be a big part of what keeps me comfortable while I improve that aspect of my riding. I've been wrapping my body around the tank, and vision may be improved now that I've stopped doing that. I don't have to turn my head and keep it up just to get to neutral, THEN turn my head into the corner. I've been doing it on the street, so it's at a real controlled speed, but I'll be able to tell more Sep 20th when the track opens back up.

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Jaybird there is plenty of time left in the season. Your local, come join us for a day at NJMP!

 

Well speak up Mang!!!

 

Which 'us' are you referring to??? Who has a date at NJMP? My club TPM has one, but it's in conjunction with Mladins retirement race and I will NOT be participating in that crashfest; too many riders thinking they can fill his shoes (LOL).

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I've been wrapping my body around the tank, and vision may be improved now

 

You should definitely see some improvements in this area too, as you've discovered, opening yourself to the turn, opens up everything really! Let us know how that goes when you start on track, see if there indeed multiple benefits to this.

 

Bullet

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