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Requiem

Becoming A Ride Coach

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Hi there,

My name is Patrick I am from Sydney Australia, I have done a search on this topic and can not find anything.

I am sorry if I am starting a similar topic...

 

I am interested as probably like many others on this forum what it takes to become a Ride Coach for California Superbike School.

I have a job that I go to because I have to, just wondering how you guys got a job that you want to go to everyday.

What skills are required to become a Ride Coach

What is the life like to be a Ride Coach

 

Many Thanks

 

I am on the waiting list for Level 1 so fingers crossed I get the call.

Cheers

Patrick

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Hi there,

My name is Patrick I am from Sydney Australia, I have done a search on this topic and can not find anything.

I am sorry if I am starting a similar topic...

 

I am interested as probably like many others on this forum what it takes to become a Ride Coach for California Superbike School.

I have a job that I go to because I have to, just wondering how you guys got a job that you want to go to everyday.

What skills are required to become a Ride Coach

What is the life like to be a Ride Coach

 

Many Thanks

 

I am on the waiting list for Level 1 so fingers crossed I get the call.

Cheers

Patrick

 

Hi Patrick,

 

Thanks for your interesting question, it's a common question on schools as well.

 

So, I'm not entirely sure it's the same the world over, so I'll speak for the UK, how it is here, and others can chime in as appropriate when they see this thread as there are several of us roaming the boards to assist and help you guys/gals out.

 

So, where to start? Well, all of the coaching staff have been students of the school. We've been through the levels, and at one point or other, either expressed an interest, or been asked whether we'd like to be part of the coaching team. Usually, this would either be a conversation with the School Director, or with the Chief Riding Coach (CRC) about why you're interested, and or, you'll have been noted by one of the coaching crew as very keen, and really able to apply the drills. This final point is a very key point, as you need to be able to demonstrate the skills you've been taught if you ever wish to be a coach. wink.gif

 

Once there has been an agreement you're interested, available, and able to commit and there is some level of agreement that it's the way to go, you'll undertake stage 1 of the program which involves you having a technical interview with the school director and the CRC. We politely call it the grilling which gives you some level of what's involved, though it's done in a good humoured manner event typically over a couple of hours.

 

Should you get through this part, you'll go onto the coaching development program, which involves you shadowing a fulltime coach over a series of school days, (Duration varies on this). You'll also start the checksheet progress which we all have to do to work through our training status, and our development plans to ensure we're able to provide the level of coaching required. You're always required to be working on improving yourself and your coaching skills in some way or other. You'll get your riding assessed as well, giving you areas of improvement, things to work on, (if there are of course). rolleyes.gif

 

So, what's it like to work as a coach? Well probably unknown to most students, most of the crew, (certainly in the UK), have fulltime jobs or other careers. We do this in addition to our normal jobs. We do the coaching because of our belief in what we've learned can improve others, and that we're wanting/willing to impart our experience onto others. So although it's good fun, the crew are exceptional individuals and we all get on well (most of the time), you really have to want to do it essentially.

 

A typical day at the school starts about 6am at the school, and finishes about 6:30pm on the evening and a little later when we have to pack up the truck on final day. It's a long day,is hard work running around allday riding with your students, and can be very draining mentally working with all students. It's long, but on the whole very rewarding though for sure.

 

Being a coach is a privilege, you get to meet some exceptionally fun people, interesting personalities, celebrities on occasion, and just weird and wonderful human being's who you wouldn't meet in everyday life I guess. We get novices, young riders, old, racers and everything in between really which makes the job very diverse and keeps it interesting. We get to ride some very cool circuits around Europe (in my case with Ascari has been my very favourite circuit I've visited), though, come rain or shine, you're riding, working with students. biggrin.gif

 

So, the key skills to become a coach? Well, I don't choose coaches, so Cobie or Adam will probably come along at some point and add to this, but communication skills are absolutely top of the list. Being able to converse clearly and simply with students about detailed technical matters can be difficult. It can complex reading your students and their body language and making sure you're getting to the right point in a way that they can understand (we of course all take things in differently). Riding well is obviously an neccesity, and I think in the USA for example you'd need to be racing to get a chance, though in the UK, some of us race (myself included), some of the team though do not. The ability to ride at the speed of your student, whilst having enough free attention to observe them is pretty key as well.

 

Hopefully that's answered many of your questions, and given you an insight into our coaching lives? If you have further questions, or if anyone else does, please just ask, and I hope you get the chance to do the school soon.

 

Bullet

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Being a coach is a privilege, you get to meet some exceptionally fun people, interesting personalities, celebrities on occasion, and just weird and wonderful human being's who you wouldn't meet in everyday life I guess. We get novices, young riders, old, racers and everything in between really which makes the job very diverse and keeps it interesting. We get to ride some very cool circuits around Europe (in my case with Ascari has been my very favourite circuit I've visited), though, come rain or shine, you're riding, working with students. biggrin.gif

 

Thanks for the glimse of life on the coaching side, Bullet. I got the impression from JET that there were quite a bit of "homework" to do as well.

 

Although I'm not a CSS coach, I am pretty sure that most of, if not all, the students that attend the school are pretty motivated to learn to ride better.

And working with highly motivated students is a great privilege and deeply motivating for a coach.

It sure is for me, when I coach on the safety riding programme here in DK.

 

 

Kai

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Being a coach is a privilege, you get to meet some exceptionally fun people, interesting personalities, celebrities on occasion, and just weird and wonderful human being's who you wouldn't meet in everyday life I guess. We get novices, young riders, old, racers and everything in between really which makes the job very diverse and keeps it interesting. We get to ride some very cool circuits around Europe (in my case with Ascari has been my very favourite circuit I've visited), though, come rain or shine, you're riding, working with students. biggrin.gif

 

Thanks for the glimse of life on the coaching side, Bullet. I got the impression from JET that there were quite a bit of "homework" to do as well.

 

Although I'm not a CSS coach, I am pretty sure that most of, if not all, the students that attend the school are pretty motivated to learn to ride better.

And working with highly motivated students is a great privilege and deeply motivating for a coach.

It sure is for me, when I coach on the safety riding programme here in DK.

 

 

Kai

 

Hi Kai,

 

Yes, there is a lot of homework/audio recording to keep on working on your coaching skills and technique, it's certainly not a case of you pass, and you never touch the books ever again I can assure you. Can be quite tricky to fit in with everything else in life sometimes.

 

I'm certain that coaching, regardless of what level you do, or where you do it provides much the same rewards? That feeling of being able to help people and improve their skills and make them happy is a very enjoyable and rewarding thing to my mind.

 

Am sure we could/should share a few stories over a beer about our experiences one day my friend. wink.gif

 

Bullet

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Thanks for the advice Bullet now if I could just find out the grilling questions I may have a chance!!!!

 

And hows the shoulder doing?

 

Dylan

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Thanks for the advice Bullet now if I could just find out the grilling questions I may have a chance!!!!

 

And hows the shoulder doing?

 

Dylan

 

That's the problem with the grilling mate, they just make it up as they go along. biggrin.gif Actually, everything you'd ever need to know is in TW2, read that many times, then have another go, then think back to how you're coached when you're at the school. Am sure Adam will advise on how they do it in OZ, I suspect it's much the same.

 

The shoulder is ok mate, I've got a horrid buldge in it, which rubs terribly in my leathers from the break/plate, but we're ok. I've just signed up for another Ironman in 2011, give me something to get fit for again, as I'm in horrible shape since the accident. Need a goal. wink.gif

 

Thanks for asking.

 

B

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Hi All

Just wanted to say many thanks to you Bullet and others for the replies. Bullet summed up my question in great detail. It is quite a privilege to be a Ride Coach with much satisfaction when you see students like me that have very poor skills and quite thick and see them progress.

 

I haven't done the level one course as yet and One reason that I am going to do it is to increase my road cornering skills. I am not confident when I ride on the road to properly tackle the corner. One question about the course is ok on a track you can become familiar with it over time knowing what corner is up ahead but how could use the skills learned at CSS to properly tackle a corner that you do not know what to expect as a corner.

I hope that is not a stupid question. I think many people do use their bike on the road more than being on a track, I am not talking about being stupid on the roads but improving general cornering skills on the road.

 

Regards

Patrick

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Hi Requiem, the courses will give you the skills to increase your level of control over your motorcycle, this comes through a fair few facets I'll quickly jot down a few - efficient steering, using the throttle to stabilize your bike, when to use the controls, vision skills to get information on what the corner is doing earlier, accuracy with your line, using your body to work with the motorcycle instead of against it.

 

Any of these above NOT relate to riding on the road? The point is, the drills can be accomplished by any rider of any skill level. Whether they want to "hang off" or not, on a cruiser or sports bike, for daily commuting or racing... all the fundamental skills of controlling a motorcycle are... well.. fundamental.

 

Sure we do this on a racetrack, but this is since we can then control the environment - giving the student the best opportunity to focus on their assigned drill, yes you may get familiar with a track over time, however the skills directly translate to roads you have never ridden before. I'd love to hear your thoughts here after doing a school now since having written this question. Cheers

 

 

 

Dylan, Bullet's described it so well... having the privilege of going through this process I know it's very accurately described and quite applicable for Oz with the addition that Aussies must show decent physical strength by way of crocodile wrestling in the creeks of Eastern Creek, be able to observe and avoid drop-bears, communicate effectively with the Kangaroo's that bounce the city streets and demonstrate the emotional care they need by way of koala hugging in the bushlands around Phillip Island, other that that - it's all the same.

 

Sorry! Should I put something in about a bad sense of humor?

 

Bullet's info about reading Twist 2 described me well, in my case I'm constantly acting on a NEED to understand the technology, not just 'why' the tech works, but 'why' it was worded the exact way Keith wrote it - since there's a reason behind every word in that book (and soft-science). It's quite cool in that you can read a sentence from Twist 2, then re-read it later and get something entirely new from it.

 

Great topic guys!

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Dylan, Bullet's described it so well... having the privilege of going through this process I know it's very accurately described and quite applicable for Oz with the addition that Aussies must show decent physical strength by way of crocodile wrestling in the creeks of Eastern Creek, be able to observe and avoid drop-bears, communicate effectively with the Kangaroo's that bounce the city streets and demonstrate the emotional care they need by way of koala hugging in the bushlands around Phillip Island, other that that - it's all the same.

 

Sorry! Should I put something in about a bad sense of humor?

 

Bullet's info about reading Twist 2 described me well, in my case I'm constantly acting on a NEED to understand the technology, not just 'why' the tech works, but 'why' it was worded the exact way Keith wrote it - since there's a reason behind every word in that book (and soft-science). It's quite cool in that you can read a sentence from Twist 2, then re-read it later and get something entirely new from it.

 

Great topic guys!

 

Nice one Jase,

 

Got the croc wrestling down pat= grab the bugger by the tail and its stuffed, drop bears avoidance= smear vegimate across your forehead, Kangaroo= gum leaves whistleing, Koala hugging after they eat should be ok cause the leaves get them stoned, but you did miss out 'throwing a SHRIMP (its really a prawn yanks!!biggrin.gif ) on the barby'

 

I am becoming one with the books, although the minister of war and finance keeps hide them,mind you I dont have soft science yet. I have been doing heaps of research on suspension set up and starting to learn more about tyre compounds.

 

Thanks Guys for the info

 

Dylan

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and demonstrate the emotional care they need by way of koala hugging in the bushlands around Phillip Island

 

Is that you as an Ozzie trying to deflect the worldwide stereotypical view that you're all into ruggers and swill beer, and only see sheila's for washing and cookiing and well, I'm sure you can connect the dots on the last one......? biggrin.gif And Crocs? you'd ###### yerself and run a mile man.... just like the rest of us...!

 

Bullet

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You were SO close Bullet!!! But mate, it's not as if we'd really run a mile just to get away from a Croc, we'd run a kilometer ..... :D :D :D

 

Guy's, CSS strives for continuous improvement across the planet, so being a coach gives you the opportunity to travel worldwide - so on Bullets visit to the old colony downunder I'm sure to take a photo of Bullet with a decent sized Croc and post it right here! :D

 

:) sorry for the banter Patrick, I'm gathered you wouldn't mind though but be sure to ask away any questions you have, as you can see it's a great place and we're ready to help your riding in any way possible here.

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Hey Patrick,

 

I think we've been in contact about this via email, or was that another Patrick asking about coaching?

 

In any case, I look ofrwrad to seeing you out at the schools one day. Hopefully you get a call up off the wait list - you gotta get in early these days :)

 

Be sure to come up and introduce yourself on the day. Would be good to have a face for the name.

 

Adam

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Hey Patrick,

 

I think we've been in contact about this via email, or was that another Patrick asking about coaching?

 

In any case, I look ofrwrad to seeing you out at the schools one day. Hopefully you get a call up off the wait list - you gotta get in early these days smile.gif

 

Be sure to come up and introduce yourself on the day. Would be good to have a face for the name.

 

Adam

 

 

Hi Adam

Yes it was me, I wanted to tell you thank you for the email reply the other day. That was very informative and surprising that you where very honest and answered all my questions.

 

I did posted a question on this forum about being a Ride Coach and I can see that the coaches have a high degree of respect for the Twist Of The Wrist II Book, and from the DVD I can see why. The DVD did show me many mistakes that I do and also explains to me why the bike acts in the wayit does. One example was why people kept telling me to relax when ridding but I did not understand why but it is amazing how it effects the bike in many ways

 

I can see that the Coaches do believe that the school and the man himself Kieth Code has something great to offer to people like me and that works. The DVD was great and I am quite disappointed about the course being booked out already for this year. So I ordered the book and will try to go through the book myself and use it on the Stanwell Tops run.

 

If I do get a course I will come over and say g’day, I have to say I was quiet surprised about how friendly open everyone is here

 

Once again Thank you hope to see ya soon

 

 

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Latecommer nic here,

Thank you all for your insights. Caught this looking for recent call for coaches.

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