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Jeff Baldwin

Reference Points

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What things can be used as reference points and can you give me some examples at say, "Streets"?

 

I've found it difficult in the Level 1 and 2 courses due to the giant X's on the ground and the rules against using brakes most of the time.

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Jeff;

It becomes easier if you use the X's to get turn in points established but with more repetitions, begin to ween yourself from their X's to your own reference points as the day progresses.

 

As for not using the brakes, that's only the first two sessions of the day as "light brakes" is usually permitted in Session 3. Brake use (and gears) is progressive with susequent sessions so you end the day with full brakes and all gears.

 

The brake (and gear) restriction in the morning is intended to free up your attention so you can focus on turn entry speed and your specific level drills. In my experience, if you go with the flow of the program, these restrictions are a help, not a hinderance.

 

Kevin Kane

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Kevin,

 

I wasn't complaining about the flow and progressive nature of the drills. I was only saying that I was having trouble learning new tracks (both level 1 and 2 were at tracks I'd never been to before) and, in level 2, I had trouble finding reference points when my only past examples were GIANT white X's. At the end of the day I still didn't use heavy braking, mostly because I'd been "spoken to" earlier and was afraid of being scolded again, plus I didn't have reference points for that.

 

My worst fear when going to the school is not being able to ride all of the sessions for whatever reason.

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This may be off topic but in terms of using gears and brakes at the school, I've found at the end of the day with the "all gears and full brakes" that it was still a little useless to go all the way up to 6th gear at the Streets of Willow. The track's straights are so short.

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Jeff,

You wrote: "I was only saying that I was having trouble learning new tracks" is the key.

 

The first time on a new track is always difficult but the School assists a rider in this orientation better than anybody. If you haven't tried it yet, wait until you attend a club track day, especially on a track you have never ridden before. You will appreciate the School's approach in ways you can't imagine right now.

 

Kevin Kane

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Kevin,

 

I also wrote, "I wasn't complaining about the flow and progressive nature of the drills."

 

Now just so there is no more confusion about my original question, I will post it once more.

 

"What things can be used as reference points and can you give me some examples at say, "Streets"?"

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I think Twist of the Wrist Vol. I addresses what can be used as reference points. I believe that they don't have to be right on the track all the time. Maybe a crack in the rumble strip, a patch of grass (although that's nowhere to be found on the SoW). It's pages 24-28 in "A Twist of The Wrist", they all cover visuals, reference points, what to look for and how to use them.

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Ok, maybe now is the time to ask this question.

 

I understand that the many and varied refrence points (RP's) are what every pilot uses to judge their line, the apex, their turn in point, etc..... for a given corner, curve or esses. If I understand things correctly TOTW 2 attempts to help the pilot condence down all of the thousand RP's into two simple points. 1) the turn in point and 2) the apex or "where you want to go". Mr. Code's "two step" turn process. This make the thought process much more simple and taxes the $10 a great deal less.

 

Each pilot uses different RP's and thus selects a different turn in point.......

 

..... however what are the RP's that all pilots use to select their optimal turn in point?

 

curve radious, up hill / down hill, decreasing radious, next corner entry point.....

 

How do you go about determining where to paint your big white "X".

 

Rman

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I don't know about anyone else, but I find if I don't have a RP at the end of the corner (ie - the point where I aim to be at full throttle and pointing at my next braking point), then I lose my other RP's.

 

What's the point of having the begining of a plan if you don't have a result in mind.

 

So that's what I do

Choose a RP at the end of the corner and draw a line back to the begining of the corner

 

or is that wrong?

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Hey Jeff...

 

The way I have understood it a RP can be ANYTHING that serves the purpose of a RP (mucho clever, hah? :rolleyes: )... meaning anything that can help you understand WHERE you are and WHAT you need to do when approaching or passing over that point. Do I need to clarify it needs to be a STEADY/ permanent point and not a parked car or a cat siting on a fence? :D:D

 

Hoped I helped in some way

 

VaS

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An RP is anything that provides you with information. It's usualy better to use something on the track but sometimes an object in the distance is better.

 

Ok so here are some examples of both types of RPs I spoke of above for The Streets. I'll put (RP) after each so you can see what I mean.

 

For turn three I use the right edge of the track (RP) and the second crack in the pavment(RP) for my turn point. I know I want to be right on the right edge of the track(RP) going in and there are two cracks(RP) that run all the way across the track when your comming down the hill aproaching turn three. I turn in at the second crack(RP). I double apex turn three so I have a spot(RP) picked out about two feet off the curbing(RP) and about 1/4 of the way through the corner for my first apex. I then let the bike run out about three feet off the curbing(RP) towards the middle of the turn. if I remember correctly there is a pavment patch(RP) that I use to tell me how far to let the bike run out. The I start to pull the bike back in for my second apex which is between the curbing(RP) and the pavement patch(RP) aboiut 3/4 of the way through the turn.

 

For the little esses comming of the back strait I use a white water tower(RP) off in the distance to line myself up for a strait shot. The esses are blind so I enter on the left side of the track(RP) and pick a skidmark(RP) on the track to use as my turn point. When the Xs(RP) are there I can use them. I turn at my skid mark(RP) and look for the water tower(RP) off in the distance. If I aim right for the water tower(RP) I will be lined up for a strait shot through the esses as I crest the rise.

 

I don't really want to write a book here so I hope you get the idea. :)

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