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What Is The Right Pressure?

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khp    2

What the 'right' tire pressure is, surely depends upon the tire, the bike, and the rider. But are there any good rules of thumb as to what pressure you should run - and how would you know? is it:

* an absolute pressure?

* a certain pressure change from cold to hot?

* an absolute temperature or change in temperature when the tire is ridden hard (e.g. on a track)?

 

Oh, and how do you go and figure these things out for yourself, if you don't have a tire expert for your particular brand on a string? Personally, I have not found the information provided on the manufacturers websites very good in this respect, and it is exceedingly seldom that I meet a tire dealer or representative at the track side, there to offer insight and help, here in Europe.

 

 

Thanks, Kai

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

What the 'right' tire pressure is, surely depends upon the tire, the bike, and the rider. But are there any good rules of thumb as to what pressure you should run - and how would you know? is it:

* an absolute pressure?

* a certain pressure change from cold to hot?

* an absolute temperature or change in temperature when the tire is ridden hard (e.g. on a track)?

 

Oh, and how do you go and figure these things out for yourself, if you don't have a tire expert for your particular brand on a string? Personally, I have not found the information provided on the manufacturers websites very good in this respect, and it is exceedingly seldom that I meet a tire dealer or representative at the track side, there to offer insight and help, here in Europe.

 

 

Thanks, Kai

 

Good question. This is always an area of confusion for riders.

 

What is the right pressure?

 

Lets start of by establishing some basics.

 

#1, we need to understand that every tire may perform differently at different pressures. What works for one tire may not be the very best for another.

 

#2, Splitting hairs on tire pressure is not going to part the Red Sea. Meaning, 0.5 Psi or 1 Psi change in pressure is not going to change your lap times by 2 seconds or more. So keep perspective, if you ride 15 seconds off the track record your not going to magically go 10 seconds faster with small change in tire pressure. Stick to the recommended till you are going very fast.

 

#3, Higher pressure increases stability at the cost of traction. Lower pressures increases traction at the cost of less stability. There is a workable window here, so don't get extreme variations from the recommended.

 

#4, Tire pressure and tire temperature are linked. As the temperature of the tire rises, so does the pressure. Don't try to control this, let it happen, its normal.

 

#5, (and most important) keep your tire pressure set point consistent. Don't change from cold to hot to off the track. pick cold or hot and stick with it.

Definitions:

Cold pressure is the pressure you set the tires at if they are cold. The tempature without warmers, just sitting there in the pits or in your garage.

Hot pressure (also called off the warmer pressure ) is when you set the pressure on the warmers, when the warmers have been on for 45-60 minutes and the tire is up to temp.

Off the track pressure is the pressure of the tire as it comes right off the track after several laps.

 

The urban legends say many different things:

 

some say only check hot

some say only check cold

check them cold, then check them hot, then reset them when they come of the track

some say to adjust the pressure till the hot and off the track pressures are the same

some say make the warmers hotter if your don't get a 2 psi rise from cold to hot.

 

These are all methods people have used. lets let these go and start fresh. They are not all correct.

 

Lets look at track day pressures for D209GPA, D211GPA, D211GP N-Tec and N-Tec Slicks. BTW: all of these have N-Tec construction.

 

The recommended Hot is 33 front and 23 rear. That is hot off the warmers. Don't change or reset them. You are done. That's it. That's all you need to know! Go ride. Ride all day.

 

Q&A:

 

What if I want more grip? what if i want more stability? Refer to #3 above - take out 1-2 psi for more traction, add 1-2 psi for more stability, but do this only hot off the warmer.

 

Why check them hot off the warmer instead of cold or off the track? Because the temperature on the warmer will ALWAYS be the same, it will ALWAYS repeat the same temperature, that gives you a BASELINE TEMPERATURE to then set your PRESSURE.

 

But the pressure went up when I checked it off the track, why don't I change it then? Because the pressure off the track is linked to the temperature off the track. That temperature will vary from lap to lap. Higher for fast sessions, and lower for slow sessions. You will forever be chasing a stable point to set your pressure if you check them based on the off the track pressure. The off the track pressure is also after the fact, you are done on the track, checking or changing the pressure then will not change the lap times you just did.

 

I just got off the track and need to make a 2 PSI change NOW and go right back out, I can't wait 30-45 minutes for the tires to stabilize on the warmers to make the change, what do I do now? Check the pressure hot off the track, whatever that reading is, make your change (add 1-2 psi or remove 1-2 psi). Note the change ( + or - ) as your NEW hot off the warmer pressure. Example: After riding you feel a 1 psi change higher is in order. you started hot off the warmer at 23 psi, checking the off the track pressure its 27, you add 1 psi making it 28 psi, note down that your hot off the warmer pressure is now 24 psi, go back out. The next day you ride, set your hot off the warmer psi to 24.

 

I am going 15 seconds off the track record. I am running the recommended PSI that is on the dunlopracing.com website. but I think I should be able to go MUCH FASTER if I change my tire pressure. Should I lower the pressure to get more traction and faster lap times? NO, NO, NO! At those lap times, varying from the recommended will not gain you what you are looking for. Stick with the recommended till you get within 5 seconds of the track record, then start making small 1 psi changes. Only make more changes if you can feel the difference in 2 psi up or down. if you can't feel that change, then that change is not helping you, go back to the recommended.

 

Everything is working good. I love my bike settings, my tires are working great, the Saturday track day was awsome. Now on Sunday the weather is 10 deg hotter. Do I change the pressure to compensate? NO! The pressure will affect the handling and stability of the bike far more than the running tire temperature. When you make a psi change you are also affecting the setup of the bike.

 

I am a slow rider, I am 20 seconds off the fastest pace. I can't seem to get my tires very hot. Should I lower the PSI to get more heat into the tire? NO. Again changing the PSI will affect the handling and stability of the bike more than the running temperature. The big thing to remember is not to put the cart in front of the horse. You are NOT trying to achieve a certain temp or psi. Your tire temp is a RESULT of you riding fast or slow. Yes, fast riders have higher tire temps, but not all high tire temps = going fast. Yes you can do things to the setup and psi to get the tire to run hotter, but that would not be a guarantee of faster lap times. that logic would be like "Ben Spies puts his right finger on the break lever, Ben wins races, I will put my right finger on the break lever, I will win races". Not logical or workable. If you are a slower rider you will not have as much heat as a faster rider, FACT. But at a slower pace you are not using the same level of grip as a fast rider. You are concerning yourself with something that is not a problem, Listen closer in the classroom and spend more time on the track doing laps. Use the recommended psi till you start going faster.

 

I don't have warmers. what do i set my pressure at? Set your pressure at 2 psi lower than the hot recommended pressure. Take 2 laps to get some heat in the tire before you start pushing it. Generaly you will get a 2 psi rise from cold to hot. The variable is the outside temperature. Could be 40 deg or 90 deg in the morning when you check it. that is why checking it on the warmer is more stable point to check psi. Cold temps always have this variable attached to them, but this in not more than 1 maybe 2 psi. 1-2 psi would not make the difference in a rider going 15 seconds off the pace, so don't go overboard here. just check it, do 2 warm-up laps, and then ride.

 

 

Lets talk about pressure changes as the temp increases:

 

 

Generally, you will see 2 psi rise from cold to hot off the warmers. If you have warmers there is no need to check them cold. 45-60 minutes on the warmer and then check them hot.

 

Fast riders may see 2-3 psi front and 3-5 psi rear rise from hot off the warmers to off the track. there really is no need to check the off the track. It is more important to listen to the rider and what he feels is going on. If the rider likes it, leave it alone. This is importaint: you only need to check rise to make sure there is not a very big rise 9+ psi. Check it once and no need to keep checking it. you are more likely to lower the psi from checking needlessly many times.

 

If by chance you get a very large rise, 9+ psi, you probobly have excess humidity in your tire, the tires are getting very hot or you have stock or bad suspension. You need to replace the air in the tire with dry air from a better compressor or put dry nitrogen in it. This condition will only happen if you have high temps at track like Daytona, Willow Springs and others. If this condition is occurring, and you are a fast rider, you need to be in direct communication with your tire supplier for tech advice and not on a forum.

 

Everything is going fine, I check my psi hot every morning, rise looks good. Then today i checked my rise and I only got 2 psi rise in the rear and I normally get 3. What do I do? Don't change anything. Don't split hairs. Refer to #2 above

 

--------------

 

 

Does anyone have specific tire combinations they want PRESSURE advice on ?

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dmj120    0

That was an excellent write-up, Steve! I found what my tires should be -cold- 30/30 track/canyon and 32/34 road (from a dealer and racer), which got the old thumbs up from Dave Moss.

 

Just cuz I wanted to, I went bumped up to 31/32 because the ambient temps dropped --- really just so I can seem like I know suttin :ph34r::lol:

 

I was excited with this thread because of its generality. That said, I understand there's usually a 3-7 psi (encompassing a general 'all' manufacturer estimate) cold-hot difference; and, that track pressures are usually lower than those for the street, primarily, because the harder you push and faster speeds cause the tires to heat-up more thereby increasing the psi.

 

If true, then it could be argued (I'm assuming here) that novice tire could be set higher than an advanced/racer's. This also appears concurrent with your #3:

#3, Higher pressure increases stability at the cost of traction. Lower pressures increases traction at the cost of less stability. There is a workable window here, so don't get extreme variations from the recommended.

 

=============

I changed from the Qualifiers to B'stones many years ago. Found the bt020,21,03,and 16's to be really comfy. Indeed, I have suck with the 16's since they came out; track, canyon, commuting - they are a good mileage and play tire. Having heard nothing but good reports about the Q2's.... what does Dunlop offer comparable to the bt016's? Something that has enough grip for a slow intermediate but also with some really good commuting ability?? I've been told the power pilot's fit this sort of bill... but felt too easy to lean, as if the profile was high instead of more rounder.

 

---I realize you're a dunlop guy and are not up to speed on other oem's stuff, so even a vague gist is cool.---

 

I'm always looking for new stuff. Honestly, though, I see more Dunlop talk revolve around the track and racing. Tires are my biggest concern. I commute 127 miles/day but also like weekend rides. If you have something that could work for my situation I'd love to hear about it.

 

Josh

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Bullet    0

Steve,

 

What brilliant, invaluable advice. As a coach and a racer, I found that just an exceptional, interesting read.

 

Thanks so very much.

 

Bullet

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

That was an excellent write-up, Steve! I found what my tires should be -cold- 30/30 track/canyon and 32/34 road (from a dealer and racer), which got the old thumbs up from Dave Moss.

 

Just cuz I wanted to, I went bumped up to 31/32 because the ambient temps dropped --- really just so I can seem like I know suttin :ph34r::lol:

 

I was excited with this thread because of its generality. That said, I understand there's usually a 3-7 psi (encompassing a general 'all' manufacturer estimate) cold-hot difference; and, that track pressures are usually lower than those for the street, primarily, because the harder you push and faster speeds cause the tires to heat-up more thereby increasing the psi.

 

If true, then it could be argued (I'm assuming here) that novice tire could be set higher than an advanced/racer's. This also appears concurrent with your #3:

#3, Higher pressure increases stability at the cost of traction. Lower pressures increases traction at the cost of less stability. There is a workable window here, so don't get extreme variations from the recommended.

 

=============

I changed from the Qualifiers to B'stones many years ago. Found the bt020,21,03,and 16's to be really comfy. Indeed, I have suck with the 16's since they came out; track, canyon, commuting - they are a good mileage and play tire. Having heard nothing but good reports about the Q2's.... what does Dunlop offer comparable to the bt016's? Something that has enough grip for a slow intermediate but also with some really good commuting ability?? I've been told the power pilot's fit this sort of bill... but felt too easy to lean, as if the profile was high instead of more rounder.

 

---I realize you're a dunlop guy and are not up to speed on other oem's stuff, so even a vague gist is cool.---

 

I'm always looking for new stuff. Honestly, though, I see more Dunlop talk revolve around the track and racing. Tires are my biggest concern. I commute 127 miles/day but also like weekend rides. If you have something that could work for my situation I'd love to hear about it.

 

Josh

 

 

Josh,

 

What specific BIKE are you looking for a recommendation for?

 

Do you want recommendations for:

Street riding?

Aggressive street riding (canyon riding)?

Track Days?

Racing?

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Cobie Fair    13

Great response Steve, tons of info.

 

We might look at a summary and pin that, but lets see what other questions we get first.

 

CF

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khp    2

Steve,

 

Thanks for your very elaborate and enlightening answer.

 

You didn't mention the effect of pressure/temperature on tire wear. I've watched Dave Moss' Unsprung show where he discusses tire wear (warning: 1h45m - not for those in a hurry or the faint of heart) and cold/hot tears.

 

Would you change pressure to "fix" cold/hot tears? - do you agree to what Dave is saying?

 

I'll stick my other questions in separate threads.

 

Thanks again,

 

Kai

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maxpr1    0

 

 

Josh,

 

What specific BIKE are you looking for a recommendation for?

 

Do you want recommendations for:

Street riding?

Aggressive street riding (canyon riding)?

Track Days?

Racing?

 

Steve,

Thanks for your great write up! Sorry for barging in on this conversation but I can't help my self, could you make recomandations for a Yamaha R6 used exclusively for track days running in intermidiate group?

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

Steve,

 

Thanks for your very elaborate and enlightening answer.

 

You didn't mention the effect of pressure/temperature on tire wear. I've watched Dave Moss' Unsprung show where he discusses tire wear (warning: 1h45m - not for those in a hurry or the faint of heart) and cold/hot tears.

 

Would you change pressure to "fix" cold/hot tears? - do you agree to what Dave is saying?

 

I'll stick my other questions in separate threads.

 

Thanks again,

 

Kai

 

 

The issue of cold tear is not something we can neatly put in a box and say we have it all figured out.

 

I can say that I have observed that colder temperatures often have more tearing. Sometimes softer compounds are more likely to tear. Sometimes suspension settings will tear a tire. while other times its the track and there is nothing that can be done about it with the given compounds at hand.

 

I have observed suspension specialist "have it all figured out" only to go to a different track or different compound and have the tire tear. When they (or we) think its all figured out, another issue arises elsewhere.

 

I am really only talking about the top teams and riders going very fast. when things slow down all these tearing issues go away. I don't want to needlessly alarm slower riders of impending doom, so to keep perspective the above is observed in the fastest of riders.

 

General points for Dunlops (keep in mind these are the compounds available TODAY, there may be newer compounds in the future that don't act this way) :

 

The soft & med compounds (7614 & 7704) will tend to tear more in colder temps below 70 deg F. NOTE: Tend to tear. Not a guarantee. The colder it gets the more likely it is to tear. its not like 71 deg is good and 70 is bad. Its a sliding scale.

 

Newer track surfaces tend to tear tires (of any compound). Some new tracks will tear softs, some hards, some tear fronts, some rears. There is no rhyme or reason, its all about the new surface and the configuration of the track. Don't not try to micro figure this out with your calculator and an engineer, just make the observation by watching others after they come off the track.

 

And with all this above I have observed top riders, winning AMA National races, with their tire tearing and they reported it gripped great and had no issues till they looked at the tire.

 

 

Addressing the area of tire wear and tire pressure: Certainly if you have the tire pressure wrong, the tire will most likely show more wear. Top riders with their chassis setup very well, will show very good wear, even when they are going very fast. When I see a fast rider's tire that just turned some fast laps and it looks good, I can be reasonably sure he has a very good setup. But the opposite is not the case. If the tire does not look good, it might be the chassis, or the compound, or the track, or the pressure. It could be many factors. All these need to be looked at and taken into consideration before making robotic checklist changes. This is where experience of the track, bike, compounds and pressures comes in handy. That is also why most races are won by the more experienced teams. New teams/mechanics/suspension guys don't have as much experience to draw from to get a quick result.

 

For track day riders the best fix for tearing is to use compounds on the harder side of the spectrum (Not a hard cruiser/touring tire, a harder compound race tire). Next make sure you have a good shock and forks. Stock shock is a major issue with tire wear and tearing with newer riders. Extremely wrong pressures, 5+/- psi from the recommended. Bad riding or throttle control issues. Its easy to spin the tire up off every corner with a 1000cc bike, its lots of fun but not so good for tire wear.

 

And again, the slower the rider is, the less these issues come up.

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

Josh,

 

What specific BIKE are you looking for a recommendation for?

 

Do you want recommendations for:

Street riding?

Aggressive street riding (canyon riding)?

Track Days?

Racing?

 

 

Steve,

Thanks for your great write up! Sorry for barging in on this conversation but I can't help my self, could you make recomandations for a Yamaha R6 used exclusively for track days running in intermidiate group?

 

 

 

R6 for track days. Intermediate group, or Advanced group:

 

3 tire choices -

D211GPA

D211GP

N-Tec slicks.

 

The D211GPA is the spec tire for the AMA. it is lower cost, $360 per set, and is a great all around tire. The AMA guys are right on the track record with this tire and there is no reason you can go very fast on it. Use the Med front and rear compounds.

 

The D211GP UK N-Tec, this tire will cost you more, about $476 per set, 2010 pricing. It is good for about 0.5 seconds per lap faster than the D211GPA (depending on the track, may be less at some tracks). This tire will last longer than the D211GPA and you will get more competitive laps from this tire. The increased cost is about the same as the increase in laps. Its a toss up if you are looking at the laps/cost issue. you need to try them both to determine on your bike which is the best bang for the buck.

 

The N-Tec Slicks. Top of the line. Nothing available is better, and I mean NOTHING IS BETTER. Cost about $496 per set, 2010 prices. This tire will last longer and grip better, for more laps, than anything available.

 

All these tires are great choices fro track days. You can't go wrong with any of them. I recommend to start at the top and if you like it stay with it. If you desire more as a rider, then step up to the next tire.

 

BTW all these 3 tires have the N-Tec construction, the D211GPA does not use the name N-Tec, but is still the N-tec construction.

 

Beginner group I would stick to the D211GPA and keep it simple. Learn to track ride with lots of laps and lots of classroom.

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spthomas    0

What specific BIKE are you looking for a recommendation for?

 

Do you want recommendations for:

Street riding?

Aggressive street riding (canyon riding)?

Track Days?

Racing?

Steve, first this has been really enlightening, thanks for taking the time to do all this explaining!

 

I'm not Josh but I have the same questions. I have an '02 Honda CBR600F4i which I ride on the track and street. I have been using the Sportmax Qualifiers, which are due to be replaced and I was looking at going to the Q2's next because that seemed to be a good track and street tire and the successor to the Qualifier. My track times are 20 sec off the local track record (set by DiSalvo), just getting moved from beginner to intermediate.

 

I also have a question about warmers- I don't have any but want to get some; I see some models with various of temp setting capabilities and simpler one with one temp setting. Is there any real reason to have multiple settings- is this a case of simpler is better?

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

Steve, first this has been really enlightening, thanks for taking the time to do all this explaining!

 

I'm not Josh but I have the same questions. I have an '02 Honda CBR600F4i which I ride on the track and street. I have been using the Sportmax Qualifiers, which are due to be replaced and I was looking at going to the Q2's next because that seemed to be a good track and street tire and the successor to the Qualifier. My track times are 20 sec off the local track record (set by DiSalvo), just getting moved from beginner to intermediate.

 

I also have a question about warmers- I don't have any but want to get some; I see some models with various of temp setting capabilities and simpler one with one temp setting. Is there any real reason to have multiple settings- is this a case of simpler is better?

 

IF you are using the Q and happy with that tire, the next logical step would be to get a Q2. You will notice the performance increase as well as the added stability of the Q2 over the Q. After that go to the D211GPA.

 

There is nothing wrong with the single temp tire warmers. Remember, all the warmer does is put heat in the tire so you don't have have to in the first 2 laps. as long as it does that job, its a good warmer. Don't over complicate things.

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fossilfuel    5

A couple of points to make here.

If you are doing track days or racing, stick Steve's post in your notebook. This is great information to have.

Dunlop tires are great. I took a a set of 6 year old Dunlop slicks that had two track days on them and ran a personal best lap time during a WERA race. I now use the N-Tec slicks for racing and have had no complaints. The thing I like about the slicks is that I am on a budget and although the tires seem to be more expensive than others, I get multiple uses because I can flip the tires and I get really good tire life out of them. You also want to feel comfortable and confident and these tires have plenty of grip.

I have always been able to talk to Steve about tires. Anytime I have called he has been great at answering my questions and shipped my tires out on time.

 

Once you have been riding for a while and get to know your tires, you can look at the wear on them and tell if you are in the ball park. There is a sweet spot that gives you good performance but doesn't sacrifice tire life.....unless you are riding a big 165 hp twin, then you are screwed.

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Cobie Fair    13

A couple of points to make here.

If you are doing track days or racing, stick Steve's post in your notebook. This is great information to have.

Dunlop tires are great. I took a a set of 6 year old Dunlop slicks that had two track days on them and ran a personal best lap time during a WERA race. I now use the N-Tec slicks for racing and have had no complaints. The thing I like about the slicks is that I am on a budget and although the tires seem to be more expensive than others, I get multiple uses because I can flip the tires and I get really good tire life out of them. You also want to feel comfortable and confident and these tires have plenty of grip.

I have always been able to talk to Steve about tires. Anytime I have called he has been great at answering my questions and shipped my tires out on time.

 

Once you have been riding for a while and get to know your tires, you can look at the wear on them and tell if you are in the ball park. There is a sweet spot that gives you good performance but doesn't sacrifice tire life.....unless you are riding a big 165 hp twin, then you are screwed.

 

Hey Fossil,

 

I think I'd like to you on a 250 Ninja! :)

 

I'm still chuckling about that. For those that don't know, Fossil is not short.

 

CF

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khp    2

I think I'd like to you on a 250 Ninja! :)

 

I'm still chuckling about that. For those that don't know, Fossil is not short.

Why don't you try me instead ;)

 

Being 6'6" and wearing 38" pants is more than enough to get me into trouble.

But I can ride a Polini DB911 dreambike :D

 

post-15296-12926183101_thumb.jpg

post-15296-129261831596_thumb.jpg

 

--Kai

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khp    2

Thanks for your great write up! Sorry for barging in on this conversation but I can't help my self, could you make recomandations for a Yamaha R6 used exclusively for track days running in intermidiate group?

 

 

 

R6 for track days. Intermediate group, or Advanced group:

 

3 tire choices -

D211GPA

D211GP

N-Tec slicks.

(snip explanation)

 

Awesome Steve. I'll give the D211GPA's a try in the spring (no need to ride around in the snow these days).

As for pricing, I have found that the US and EU have seriously different pricing structures.

 

Is the GP-A the same as the ones known as "D211GP Racer" here in Europe?

Germany pricing & naming

 

Thanks, again,

 

Kai

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

Thanks for your great write up! Sorry for barging in on this conversation but I can't help my self, could you make recomandations for a Yamaha R6 used exclusively for track days running in intermidiate group?

 

 

 

R6 for track days. Intermediate group, or Advanced group:

 

3 tire choices -

D211GPA

D211GP

N-Tec slicks.

(snip explanation)

 

Awesome Steve. I'll give the D211GPA's a try in the spring (no need to ride around in the snow these days).

As for pricing, I have found that the US and EU have seriously different pricing structures.

 

Is the GP-A the same as the ones known as "D211GP Racer" here in Europe?

Germany pricing & naming

 

Thanks, again,

 

Kai

 

The D211GPA is NOT the same tire as the "D211GP Racer"

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faffi    12

Since we're talking pressure - what impact does it have on street riding wear? Most bikes today seems to be recommended to run 36F and 42R. Will life deteriorate markedly if one was to run 30/34 for instance?

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khp    2

Is the GP-A the same as the ones known as "D211GP Racer" here in Europe?

The D211GPA is NOT the same tire as the "D211GP Racer"

So is that an entirely different tire, or is it equivalent to one of the US tires?

 

Thanks,

 

Kai (I'll be stepping outside while I rant over tires not being the same across the world).

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4speed    0

 

3 tire choices -

D211GPA

D211GP

N-Tec slicks.

 

The D211GPA is the spec tire for the AMA. it is lower cost, $360 per set, and is a great all around tire. The AMA guys are right on the track record with this tire and there is no reason you can go very fast on it. Use the Med front and rear compounds.

 

The D211GP UK N-Tec, this tire will cost you more, about $476 per set, 2010 pricing. It is good for about 0.5 seconds per lap faster than the D211GPA (depending on the track, may be less at some tracks). This tire will last longer than the D211GPA and you will get more competitive laps from this tire. The increased cost is about the same as the increase in laps. Its a toss up if you are looking at the laps/cost issue. you need to try them both to determine on your bike which is the best bang for the buck.

 

The N-Tec Slicks. Top of the line. Nothing available is better, and I mean NOTHING IS BETTER. Cost about $496 per set, 2010 prices. This tire will last longer and grip better, for more laps, than anything available.

 

All these tires are great choices fro track days. You can't go wrong with any of them. I recommend to start at the top and if you like it stay with it. If you desire more as a rider, then step up to the next tire.

 

BTW all these 3 tires have the N-Tec construction, the D211GPA does not use the name N-Tec, but is still the N-tec construction.

 

Beginner group I would stick to the D211GPA and keep it simple. Learn to track ride with lots of laps and lots of classroom.

 

 

Steve,

 

Thank you for all the great info! I have a question concerning the N-Tec Slicks. I've been running the Bridgestone slicks for the past 2 years and while I really like them as far as grip, feel, and wear (to an extent), I keep hearing great things about the Dunlops. I am an advanced rider on an 09 R1. Prior to that I was on an 04 ZX-10R in Italy. I was using the Pirelli's but they wear out way too quickly and just weren't that good compared to the "stones". Any feedback you can give would be appreciated as I'm looking at what to get next, for 2 days at Jennings in March.

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

Is the GP-A the same as the ones known as "D211GP Racer" here in Europe?

The D211GPA is NOT the same tire as the "D211GP Racer"

So is that an entirely different tire, or is it equivalent to one of the US tires?

 

Thanks,

 

Kai (I'll be stepping outside while I rant over tires not being the same across the world).

 

 

 

Its hard to compare tires from one continent to another. Some tires are manufactured and supplied to certain regions.

 

where are you racing/riding? what tracks?

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4speed    0

Its hard to compare tires from one continent to another. Some tires are manufactured and supplied to certain regions.

where are you racing/riding? what tracks?

 

 

I have been on NJMP both Thunderbolt and Lightning, as well as VIR South and Full.

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DUNLOP-RTS    3

 

 

Steve,

 

Thank you for all the great info! I have a question concerning the N-Tec Slicks. I've been running the Bridgestone slicks for the past 2 years and while I really like them as far as grip, feel, and wear (to an extent), I keep hearing great things about the Dunlops. I am an advanced rider on an 09 R1. Prior to that I was on an 04 ZX-10R in Italy. I was using the Pirelli's but they wear out way too quickly and just weren't that good compared to the "stones". Any feedback you can give would be appreciated as I'm looking at what to get next, for 2 days at Jennings in March.

 

You will find that the N-Tec Slick is the top of the line tire. I will give you some facts: just last week the track record at Jennings was broken by a Dunlop N-Tec slick. The N-Tec will also last 2 times longer than any other tire (given comparable compounds, bike, and lap times).

 

Certainly the Dunlop N-Tec slicks will be a large step forward from the two tires you mentioned. I recommend the 6680 compound front and rear for NJMP and Jennings.

 

You can't go wrong with that choice. Give them a try. Its better you try them and become more educated and experience, rather than thinking you should have.

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4speed    0

 

 

Steve,

 

Thank you for all the great info! I have a question concerning the N-Tec Slicks. I've been running the Bridgestone slicks for the past 2 years and while I really like them as far as grip, feel, and wear (to an extent), I keep hearing great things about the Dunlops. I am an advanced rider on an 09 R1. Prior to that I was on an 04 ZX-10R in Italy. I was using the Pirelli's but they wear out way too quickly and just weren't that good compared to the "stones". Any feedback you can give would be appreciated as I'm looking at what to get next, for 2 days at Jennings in March.

 

You will find that the N-Slick is the top of the line tire. I will give you some facts: just last week the track record at Jennings was broken by a Dunlop N-Tec slick. The N-Tec will also last 2 times longer than any other tire (given comparable compounds, bike, and lap times).

 

Certainly the Dunlop N-Tec slicks will be a large step forward from the two tires you mentioned. I recommend the 6680 compound front and rear for NJMP and Jennings.

 

You can't go wrong with that choice. Give them a try. Its better you try them and become more educated and experience, rather than thinking you should have.

 

 

Excellent! I sent you a email about them yesterday, please let me know when you get a chance.

 

John

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jasonbw    0

As a CSS ride coach from the schools in Oz I'd like to share something about the Dunlop Sportmax Q2's we use on our coach bikes.

 

Guys, we use these Sportmax Q2's in ALL conditions, pouring thick rain to amazing heat from this brown sunburnt land, on smooth low traction surfaces to rough high traction circuits, without tyre warmers - with constant stop/start work yet run hard even on the out-lap, working with all skills levels between new road riders to national placing champions on full slicks or wets .... basically the worst of all possibilities for anyone riding combined street and track days. What do I think of these Q2's?

 

I wouldn't want ANY other tyre! They warm up incredibly fast, offer the amazing traction and when we pushed to slide them the traction changes in a nice, linear rate. In the pouring wet the traction is nothing short of amazing, in the dry it feels like you're on slicks! These Dunlop Sportmax Q2's absolutely ROCK! It's what I run on my streetbike too (and I pay full retail price!).

 

So yep, I guess you can call me a Q2 fan!!!

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