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Weighting A Footpeg - Inside Or Outside?

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Should I be weighting the inner peg on entry then transferring weight to outer peg as leverage ou should I be weight the outside peg only, forgetting the whole weight the inside peg?

 

Rgds/Ridiculefr35

 

Hi Ridiculefr35

 

 

To answer this question, you will carry weight on the inside peg, but you base/stability comes from the outside peg. If you lean off too far on the inside (well I always find), you'll have achy knees). Now, as tto timing? When do you think it might be better to this in the turn, before the turn? What difference would it make with each approach?

 

Bullet

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Hi Ridiculefr35

To answer this question, you will carry weight on the inside peg, but you base/stability comes from the outside peg. If you lean off too far on the inside (well I always find), you'll have achy knees). Now, as tto timing? When do you think it might be better to this in the turn, before the turn? What difference would it make with each approach?

 

Bullet

 

Hi Bullet and thank you for addressing my question. :D

To answer your following question, I'd say:

- before the turn both pegs evenly carrying weight.

- into the turn(right hander), inner peg is biased for weight(to help initiate the turn?) but outer peg is "ready"

- turning in, outside peg becomes biased in weight to leverage the left knee and inner peg carrying weight but not weighted any more.

 

- I'd want to set up the bike so that I can use the momentum from entry point to apex without further steering inputs after turn in and before the apex, as I suspect this will make my entry look "wave" like or "untidy" and probably force me to correct my line mid-corner.

 

:unsure: .... ?

 

Brgds/Ridiculefr35

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Hi Ridiculefr35

To answer this question, you will carry weight on the inside peg, but you base/stability comes from the outside peg. If you lean off too far on the inside (well I always find), you'll have achy knees). Now, as tto timing? When do you think it might be better to this in the turn, before the turn? What difference would it make with each approach?

 

Bullet

 

Hi Bullet and thank you for addressing my question. :D

To answer your following question, I'd say:

- before the turn both pegs evenly carrying weight.

- into the turn(right hander), inner peg is biased for weight(to help initiate the turn?) but outer peg is "ready"

- turning in, outside peg becomes biased in weight to leverage the left knee and inner peg carrying weight but not weighted any more.

 

- I'd want to set up the bike so that I can use the momentum from entry point to apex without further steering inputs after turn in and before the apex, as I suspect this will make my entry look "wave" like or "untidy" and probably force me to correct my line mid-corner.

 

:unsure: .... ?

 

Brgds/Ridiculefr35

 

So, by now, you've probably discovered the word stable/stability in our world of cornering? I wonder what difference you think those answer might make to stability of you and more importantly your affect on the bike?

 

Bullet

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I have come to the conclusion that weighting the inside peg is a bad thing. Mainly because it does this to your boots. I have bought stompgrips (and gone on a diet :lol: ) to help take some load off!

post-14359-0-84419100-1300104290_thumb.jpg

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I have come to the conclusion that weighting the inside peg is a bad thing. Mainly because it does this to your boots. I have bought stompgrips (and gone on a diet :lol: ) to help take some load off!

 

Yes my friend, you have reached a level of riding that few attain. Some people ride for years and not get to this level. You have earned the coveted "Hole In Boot" Badge :D

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I have come to the conclusion that weighting the inside peg is a bad thing. Mainly because it does this to your boots. I have bought stompgrips (and gone on a diet :lol: ) to help take some load off!

 

Yes my friend, you have reached a level of riding that few attain. Some people ride for years and not get to this level. You have earned the coveted "Hole In Boot" Badge :D

 

Cool :D

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I do have to pay attention to where I put my feet. The inside foot somehow gets to point the toes straight down, and on my old boots the sliders wouldn't catch that. Hasn't been a problem with our new A-stars which are fantastically comfortable too, really happy with those.

 

CF

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Now instead of hanging a full butt cheek off just move somewhere between one to three inches to the side when setting up for the corner... basically very little, see if this lets your outside knee (from the knee to halfway towards the groin) come in contact with the tank more as this is where you will be holding on best (the stronger Quad muscles). If all your contact is close to the groin (abductors) then you wont be able to maintain that pressure for long, best to use the quads which are far more powerful.

Picture that your outside knee can be rivetted into the tank...to get to that position most people need to move a little back in the seat, not so close to the tank, this is where it's important to refine this with a coach in person, as everyone is an individual ("no I'm not!"), now in that position further back from the tank, is it easier to get the upper body lower? can you easily get your knee way further out than before? Does this position give you more room for your arms and potentially for some... the beer gut? Do you feel more stable should you hit bumps? How about how much lighter you can relax on the bars? easier there? Can you last longer at trackdays doing this? with a more stable bike and less lean or more speed with your knee down earlier (big goal for some)? Most importantly or you, how is your footpeg weight? A bit better?

 

 

This sounds good but what is this guy doing?

 

http://www.motorcyclenews.com/upload/212093/images/casey-stoner-practice.jpg

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This sounds good but what is this guy doing?

 

http://www.motorcycl...er-practice.jpg

 

Being Casey Stoner. They don't call him an Alien for nothing :D.

 

Stoner.jpg

 

All kidding aside, that picture is of a world champion. In his world, some of the rules (and coaching) that apply to mere mortals are bent, broken, or just plain ignored.

 

Jason addressed some of this in an earlier post:

 

It's a great and often asked question there Brad! We teach you the method of locking on that is easiest, that is using the outside quad muscles anchored to the tank.

 

You might see Rossi or Lorenzo use this great method, but there there are many others who use a different method that works for them, i.e. Pick a pro rider that might prefer to get his or her butt off the seat more, which leaves their upper body high and a little crossed up, as they've rotated around the tank they can't use the outside quads, so they're using their calf muscles, abductors, heel, butt, elbow etc ANYTHING they can to get the best lock on possible.

 

I.e. Our way isn't the only way, but once you try it at one of our Level 3 schools I'm pretty sure you'll think it's the best way.

 

Now if your question is more along the lines of why it works for him...maybe Jason or Cobie will chime in again...

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In his world, some of the rules (and coaching) that apply to mere mortals are bent, broken, or just plain ignored.

 

Like 'The Matrix'?

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Nice picture, Mike. Is that you? :rolleyes:

 

I can't tell if you're being sarcastic, Mike. I think Casey Stoner's position looks pretty good. He is keeping the outside knee pointed forward and pressed against the tank. This gives him plenty of room to lean off to the inside. He looks comfortable and in control. He's not crossed up. His head, eyes, shoulders and hips are all pointed in the direction of travel. My impression is that Stoner has a good solid lower body position that allows him to lean his upper body forward and in toward the inside handgrip more than some other riders. It's more than I need at my level, but I'd be happy with Stoner's riding position.

 

What I don't see is Stoner opening his hips up so far that his outside knee and toes actually point out, away from the bike. His lower body position is not so extreme that he has to grip the frame above the outside footpeg with his heel and hold himself on the bike with is leg biceps. I've seen pros ride that way and it looks very tiring and uncomfortable. The leg biceps are fast-twitch high-strength fibers that fatigue quickly. You wouldn't want to ride 3 or 4 laps that way then hit a bump. If I tried that, I'd be rolling down the track waving bye-bye to my race bike.

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Its amazing to me how many top racers insist on telling you to weight the inside peg both to turn and to maintain a line mid corner.

I have even had a heated discussion with an international enduro and supermotard champion who teaches all his pupils to weight the outside peg (for all the reasons we all know) but maintains that on proper track bikes you must weight the inside peg because:

a) he's been taught that by a 500cc GP racer (who publishes a lot of advice on riding techniques)

B) otherwise when the rear steps out it might high side you rather than a low side crash

 

Having said that; all my life I've been weighting the outside peg and improved my technique considerably by doing level 3 some years ago but have always had issues with ground clearance on my bikes and was advised by many people (Andy included) to lean off the bike more - an action I found very difficult and still maintain a 'traditional' outside leg anchor point. Eventually I was 'bullied' by one of my riding 'gods' into 'weighting the inside peg as an experiment and reduced my lap times by a significant amount. Basically, I'm too short to retain the braced knee position on many bikes and still hang off enough. I spent some time talking to Andy about this.

 

My 'new' technique involves still weighting the outside peg - using the outside peg, through my quads and back to power turn the bike, uses both pegs for the hip flick but uses both inside and outside pegs to give me a really secure locked in position for corner entry, mid corner and corner exit - but transferring more weight through the outside peg and back of the seat as I exit or as I 'hook' the turn.

What I'm still struggling with is upper body position and rolling the bike more upright underneath me on corner exit - all I can do is move my upper body more into the corner which I should be doing anyway.

 

Looking fwd to doing level 4 this year to help resolve / improve in this area.

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