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Hayabusa On The Track

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I love my 2011 Busa and I've tried really hard to work around all the negatives regarding the bike as a dragster only. If I really want to enjoy the twisties (there's no track near me), should I bite the bullet and get a liter bike? Thanks

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I've never ridden a a Busa but I did have a K1200R. I finally decided to get a literbike because I wanted a track machine. If I wasnt doing track days I would have stayed with the KR, it was much more road-friendly.

 

That said, I've have seen several Busas on the track so it's not like they cant do it...

 

So what is it about your Busa that makes you think you might need a literbike?

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So what is it about your Busa that makes you think you might need a literbike?

I have the same question... and, what are you doing (or want to do) in the twisties (i.e. public roads) that requires literbike potency?

 

It may be worth mentioning, most track addicts have to travel hours (or even days) to ride the track. It may sound expensive, but compare it to speeding or reckless driving tickets, dodging careless drivers, the possibility of severely injuring (or killing) yourself or another driver, etc., etc... going to the track pobably is cheap.

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I've never ridden a a Busa but I did have a K1200R. I finally decided to get a literbike because I wanted a track machine. If I wasnt doing track days I would have stayed with the KR, it was much more road-friendly.

 

That said, I've have seen several Busas on the track so it's not like they cant do it...

 

So what is it about your Busa that makes you think you might need a literbike?

 

More here say and reasoning than experience. Reasoning in the sense of weight and dimensions; Is there any thing there that can't be overcome with skill? My belief is that with proper technique and body strength I should do well. It sounds like your answer bears that out in part. If any thing I'm crazy about the bike and would love to keep it.

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So what is it about your Busa that makes you think you might need a literbike?

I have the same question... and, what are you doing (or want to do) in the twisties (i.e. public roads) that requires literbike potency?

 

It may be worth mentioning, most track addicts have to travel hours (or even days) to ride the track. It may sound expensive, but compare it to speeding or reckless driving tickets, dodging careless drivers, the possibility of severely injuring (or killing) yourself or another driver, etc., etc... going to the track pobably is cheap.

I have no argument to your observation. That's another important of the many reasons why I'm entering the school and seeing what the trek to the track means in terms of time and money. I hate the risks involved with pushing it on public roads.

Edit: thank you both for your responses.

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I have ridden a Busa on VIR, it was a hoot. there is nothing that cuts through the air like a Busa, The high speed acceleration can not be beat! It isn't my first choice for a track bike but if you have the suspension set-up it can be a joy to ride. I took a 99 ZX9 to Willow and raced it, Never known as a "race" bike people laughed at me. At least until the flags flew, overweight by 50 lbs to a GSXR and down 25 horse I still managed to put it on the podium more often than not. The reason was I found the sweet spot to make it go around a corner. The single biggest problem with getting a Busa set-up correctly is that it take a lot to get the shock out, kind of a pain.

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If you like your Busa then I suspect you can find the ways to get around its potential disadvantages (size, weight). If you get to CSS this year, I'm sure you can find a few minutes to chat with your coach about techniques to help you manage your Busa, have loads of fun, but keep the ride safe.

 

If my prior post was offensive, I apologize. I think you will find most everyone here has your/our best interests at heart.

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More here say and reasoning than experience. Reasoning in the sense of weight and dimensions; Is there any thing there that can't be overcome with skill? My belief is that with proper technique and body strength I should do well. It sounds like your answer bears that out in part. If any thing I'm crazy about the bike and would love to keep it.

 

There are better track machines than a Busa but I would agree with Balistic and BVH, if you like it, spend some time setting it up. After you have done some schools and maybe a few track days you will have an idea what it needs. You will surely have fun on it and if you end up at a point that you feel a pure sportbike is needed then maybe a dedicated track bike is the answer.

 

It sounds like you are on the right path, looking to get into CSS and improving your skills. From there you can decide what the right steed (or steeds) is for you.

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I've also ridden a Busa on a track (small track). If you ride one of the BMW S1000's, you will have a good camparison on a sharp/lighter weight bike, and then you'll know the difference.

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Ballistic, Thanks for your experience at VIR. The Busa can pull hard for sure. I love it when the big guy gets on the podium! Thanks for the heads up on the shock. Brad, Thanks also for the encouragement and for pointing out what's most important both on and off the track. Thanks for checking in on my feelings as well. Flight, Thanks because I'd like to see how far I can take the Busa. I really do love it and have a lot of faith in it too. Thanks for your comments on my path. Cobie, I'm honored. You're succinct and spot on.

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Just cause you're bike isn't a scaled back replica of a WSBK championship winning racer doesn't meant it isn't perfectly at home and capable in the twisties. I believe its not that uncommon for older gentlemen on R1150GS's to smoke young hot shot's on sportbikes through windy back roads, It's got little to do with the machinery and everything to do with the rider. A CRF450R is way less purpose built for a road track then your Busa is, doesn't make it any less fun to ride the wheels off it tho. Bottom line, ride the bike you want to ride and enjoy it.

 

Tyler

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I believe its not that uncommon for older gentlemen on R1150GS's to smoke young hot shot's on sportbikes through windy back roads,

 

Not uncommon and seriously fun to watch :D.

 

Well said Tyler.

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Thanks Tyler and Flight, With ten thousand miles on the Busa in four months you might get the idea I like it some. Some of it might be grass is greener and no doubt there are better track bikes. However I'm realizing more and more I love what I have.

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My dyno showed its a two hundred mile an hour bike with 181 hp and 109ft/lbs. Hope I can get it bumped up to 215 by school but doubt it.

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A long wheelbase is gonna handicap you on short twisties ... fat tires are gonna affect your quick turn rate AND effective lean angle ...

 

 

I'd recommend a 600-750 race bike with 1350-1410 MM (tops) wheelbase plus suspension tuned to your weight and super sport tires (dunlop Q2's) if you wanna be serious running short/medium twisties .

 

If you are a real scientific (and light , <200 pouds ) guy who looks at power (both torque and hp) to weight ratio , the duke 690 / street 675 R is a very potent overall package.

 

lots of new / 2nd hand JDM 600-750 class bikes fit the bill too! (CBR600 /GSXR600 /ZX 6R/ R6)

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For road riding, just about any semi-sporting bike will do. The pace between a 1985 GSX-R750 and a 2013 GSX-R1000 and a Hayabusa will be next to nothing if you A) keep your speed in a range where you will not have to hand in your permit and B) ride no faster than you can see the road to be clear. The further you want to push it into risk territory, the greater the benefit of more modern material. However, in backroad country, race reps do not rule. Instead, nimble bikes with fairly upright seating does due to more leverage and a more suitable riding position. Race reps begin to get into their own at about 50 mph and above. The faster, the more suitable. And also further into risk zone.

 

In short, for road riding just about any motorcycle can be enjoyed. 30 years ago, people raved about the grip from the tyres and the handling allowed by good suspension and solid frames. They had fun in the twisties in 1983 just as in 1953 or 1903. Neither of them were a patch on you Hayabusa, which is a brilliant bike. It's all about perspective. If you decide to enjoy your riding, you will. If you have decided not to enjoy riding because your mind is set on getting another type of motorcycles, you either have to get a new bike or work on your mindset :D

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Is the Busa the best choice ? I don't think so, that said tho, I had the pleasure of seeing a good rider drag his plastics on a Busa as he was running circles around most of the other riders on the track in advanced group

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I love my 2011 Busa and I've tried really hard to work around all the negatives regarding the bike as a dragster only. If I really want to enjoy the twisties (there's no track near me), should I bite the bullet and get a liter bike? Thanks

 

I love my 2011 Busa and I've tried really hard to work around all the negatives regarding the bike as a dragster only. If I really want to enjoy the twisties (there's no track near me), should I bite the bullet and get a liter bike? Thanks

I found a straight up trade for a 2008 gixer1000 with 3000 mi for my 2011 Busa with 16000mi and nice mods that has put up 181hp 109 Tq and went over 200mph on the Dyno. I can ride it respectably in the corners.

My main concern is that the Gsxr may be very uncomfortable compared to the Busa.

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What are you riding for ? If you are using the bike for transportation - then the Gixxer is moderately comfortable in the sportbike world. The hayabusa might be a bit more comfortable since its a longer/wider type of bike, but none are really /that/ comfortable. . . In terms of comfort, you would be a lot more comfortable in an upright cruiser and a slew of other bikes before a superbike/sportbike.

 

The school isn't really about type of bike though - as long as you have a bike you can handle (or use theirs) then you can learn/use the skills that you are trying to gain.

 

And if you really want a superbike for the track/school - there are a lot of bikes that can hit 180+ hp that are easily rideable around the track. the BMW s1000rr school bike is 180+ (though torque is a bit lower), several Duc's, KTM's, etc etc are all in that category.

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So far I'm keeping Busa unless I can find the right gixxer. In the meantime I'm modding her with a better race seat, bigger rear sprocket so it digs a little better, maybe more hp, and possibly lighter wheels, maybe lowering it, and with some aesthetic stuff thrown in as well. I love the bike and I'm told there are some who can practically make one talk and as much as I doubt I'm one of them, it certainly won't be for lack of want or trying. I really hope I get to be under Keith's watchful eye in my two days this year...my first time in the school. I've studied his methods pretty hard and my friends think I've improved a lot as a result. If I'm gonna be a big bad Busaman he's the one to help me more than anyone don't you think? Nonetheless, I'm also looking forward to the crew chief getting at least a glance at my Busa. I considered renting an RR for the first day but if I still have my bike in August during camp I'll be keeping her for the foreseeable future so its what I want to learn on. Even though Keith thinks the RR is the way to go I just can't swing it financially; if I get the Gsxr its going to be a straight up trade. Thanks to everyone who helped make this a hot topic.

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You will be faster with less hp - the last thing you want is more power, especially if the powerband is shifted upwards. Same with lower gearing; it will increase rear wheel torque and with it the chance of spinning up the rear. So you will get scared and wait too long to open the throttle and the others will leave you behind.

 

Lowering it will make it harder to change directions and reduce cornering clearance. Lighter wheels is always a good thing, but they cost $ - money you said you don't have since you cannot afford to upgrade to a race rep. Spending money on bling doesn't make sense to me - put the cash in the bank instead and save for the bike you seem to think you must have.

 

Hopefully, the school will manage to get your priorities straight ;)

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Well...that certainly was informative. I disagree with most of it but that's ok because I respect your opinion. I thought maybe I could get some cheap used Gsxr wheels, and my bling is very inexpensive. I'm good with my wrist twisting so not fearful of extra gearing not to mention that the power to weight ratio of an RR is way bigger on an RR vs Busa. Again, respect to you and thanks for taking the time to respond...oh one lst comment..hp is probably something I can't afford. Hope to see you on the track--in my rear view mirror...just a joke. Peace.

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Almost anybody would have trouble watching me in their rear view mirrors as they will be long gone up front for me to be visible in reflection :lol: Slow and OK with it.

 

I guess my point was that, to me, you seem like you want it all without paying the price. You must decide if you want to go around a track as fast as possible (for you) or if you want to learn how to circulate your Busa as best you can around a track. The Busa is no ideal track bike - probably about 5 seconds slower than a BMW S1000RR around a typical race track. Then again, the S1000RR is no ideal street bike, offering very little in the way of comfort. Not that the Busa is a challenger for your Gold Wing, either, but still not nearly as extreme as the RR.

 

As has already been said, if you can only afford one bike, you must compromise. Or you can opt for a cheap but well kept GSX-R600 for track duty and get another cheap but well kept Busa (let's say 10 year old for both) for road duty and still have a dollar left for an extra track day ^_^

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Most important thing is to have a bike you enjoy having and riding, and as you say, rider skill is generally far more important than the bike itself.

 

What is your purpose in lowering the bike? If you are planning to ride it on the track, lowering it will reduce your ground clearance (could limit your ability to lean it over without scraping pegs or other hard parts), shorten your suspension travel, and potentially have a negative effect on steering characteristics if it isn't done properly (changing rake/trail).

 

Larger rear sprocket will make the bike touchier on the throttle - could be good fun but could also make the bike harder to manage in turns. There might be some advantage to waiting until after your school date to change the sprocket; throttle control is important and it could be tougher if the throttle response is too abrupt.

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I was just going to post essentially what elrik wrote.

 

You must decide if you want to go around a track as fast as possible (for you) or if you want to learn how to circulate your Busa as best you can around a track.

 

Read that line carefully as thats the essence here. .. I know a lot of people want to ride their own bikes - so much so that they will sign up for the 1 days for that exact purpose. But if you're goal is to be a better rider regardless of bike (which is essentially the point of the school/class) - then don't let less than ideal tools hold you back or be the reason that you can't get there. . . This isn't a knock on any bike as all of us go to the bikes that we own, but we go to CSS to get better - and hopefully nothing gets in the way of that. ..

 

 

It's like you go to a top cooking camp with Wolfgang Puck, but you aren't going to say - I'm bringing my own ingredients and thats what I'm cooking with.

 

Thats not to say you won't learn a lot - as you will. Just that IMO, you become a better rider and then apply that with the limits of your bike, rather than trying to learn to the limit of your bike.

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