Jump to content
faffi

Tell Me Why

Recommended Posts

Learning tracks is a skill as well as any other, where some are better than others. It may be a weak spot for Rossi, something history support to some extent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The importance of set-up - and how difficult it is:

 

Smith: We started with the Misano setting and worked round it to suit Aragon. Sometimes I can't believe just how much the smallest of details can make such a big difference, but that's MotoGP and it's a science project.

 

Emmet: A MotoGP machine has variable suspension, variable chassis geometry, variable engine characteristics, variable engine braking characteristics, variable traction control characteristics. Even variations in tire pressure are having bigger and bigger effects, as the single tire removes the option of changing construction and compound. Each of these variables interacts with all of the others, making for an almost infinitely complex system. Mastering that system is getting more and more difficult, and becoming more and more valuable. Those that can do so can expect their rewards to start going through the roof.

 

A good Spies interview can be found here about the same topic: http://www.bikesportnews.com/news-detail.cfm?newsid=8546

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nice link Eirik, some good points in there, I was surprised by how plainly Spies says he simply cannot ride the Yamaha at a front runner pace with his technique.

 

With the exception of CoTA, which is brand new, when was the last time Rossi was at a "New" track anyway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andrea Dovizioso:

What riders would like is to have less electronic systems because the electronics are really excessive and you really can't ride in a normal way. We've got the electronics for safety but they aren't so good when you want to ride in a normal way to battle with other riders. Basically there is too much electronics for battling but they're good for safety.

 

Crash.net:

Does the very high performance of the Bridgestone tyres prevent close competition?

Andrea Dovizioso:
No, I don't think that's right. There are many reasons why this happens, all the electronics we use is another. The Bridgestones are the best tyre in the world and keep a good lap time from the beginning to the end, not every rider can keep that pace over a race distance though so it's not only the tyre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crash.net:
What have you found more difficult to get used to, the bike or the tyres?

Bradley Smith:
Tyres are totally critical in MotoGP and you have to get the balance of the bike right to work the tyres in the right way. They're the key to the performance of this motorcycle and are the key to success.

I love the tyres but they're very difficult to get used to and especially because they'll have a different feeling at each track and you have to learn what that feeling means. I guess that's what a rookie season is all about, learning those feelings and the reactions from those feelings.

Crash.net:
Do you think we could have better competition if we had a lower spec tyre?

Bradley Smith:
Yeah, absolutely. If we created an environment where the tyre lasted let's say between 10 and 15 laps and the rider had to manage them after that, which is something that we have in World Superbikes, I believe that that could create more competition and make it more critical as to how the rider uses the bike and approaches the race.

I'm not going to ask for less performance from a tyre though, I just think we'd see different racing. Not necessarily much more competitive, but different.

 

I would like to see and did enjoy the days when there were two tyre manufacturers because they were always fighting to make the best tyre for a given race. It was very exciting. I do feel that racing is closer given the single tyre rule though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harder to be competitive because there are so many variables. Also can be hard to ride because the engine will behave differently from corner to corner and also, if you get low on fuel, throughout the race. Bikes are adjusted for engine braking that often varies from one corner entrance to the next, power delivery is also altered throughout the course to save fuel. So it's not as if you can just jump on, give some throttle and let the electronics do the job for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×