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How Fast Can You Go Round A Corner?

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Thanks Dylan! This is a great post, it's well written, understandable and helps bridge the gap between what makes sense from a physics standpoint and what makes sense from a practical standpoint.

 

Thanks for taking the time and effort to get that info, this was a very interesting read!

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Thanks Dylan! This is a great post, it's well written, understandable and helps bridge the gap between what makes sense from a physics standpoint and what makes sense from a practical standpoint.

 

Thanks for taking the time and effort to get that info, this was a very interesting read!

You're welcome. I'm very fortunate to have a few people to call on to help sort out things, or at least shed more light on them. The main one being Keith himself. We talk for 30-45 minutes almost every day.

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...............This is just a long-winded way of saying that you should not try to reason that cornering Gs on a bike would be no better than driving or stopping Gs. The G-limits of cornering are different from those of driving and stopping.

.............

-Eric

 

Eric is very correct. :)

 

Around two years ago, I took some time to run some calculations and to draw an AutoCAD schematic overlaying a picture of Stoner:

 

http://forums.superbikeschool.com/index.php?showtopic=3324&&page=3#entry26802

 

At that instant, he and his bike were leaning 57 degrees respect to a vertical line and he was feeling 184% heavier in that angle's direction (1.84 G).

The contact patches were feeling a lateral force 154% higher than the weight they felt vertically (1.54 G).

 

It seems to me that one of the limits in that case was the lateral clearance (leg against track). :)

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Here's a traction circle from 3 riders on a track. You can see spikes in braking which we would expect to see particularly when coming out of a tuck on a straight. We also see some cornering past 1g which I would say would be banked turns. The majority of the traces exist around or within the cofines of 1g.

post-9398-0-68238000-1394467219_thumb.png

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All this not withstanding its an intricate process and "you can't be in a hurry. I've seen guys in a hurry and they don't make it" Twist II. Every time I think I've got it, eventually I realize there's yet more to learn. Thanks for bringing up the topic. It helped me.

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I find that its possible to "get through the corner with as little lean angle as possible" paraphrase Twist II....at least sometimes I get through a turn with way less lean faster than I thought was possible. I realize we are talking about a special case when maximum lean is a must but choosing when is an art.

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