Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Hotfoot

Share Your Cornering Challenges

Recommended Posts

So let's have a little cornering conversation - lurkers and new members, speak up!

 

Riders at every level of riding have challenges with certain types of corners. What type of corners do YOU struggle with, and what do you find yourself doing, to try to handle it (good solutions or bad ones!)?

 

Share your challenges, and if you have types of corners you LOVE, share that, too, and tell us why you love them. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long, constant radius turns like turn 2 at Barber, 7 at Summit Point, and other carousel type long turns. I feel like I'm cruising through them or making multiple apexes out of them but never patiently holding good speed until time to roll back on for the exit.

 

Esses, my temptation is to be rolling on throttle as I go knee-to-knee on the final turn of the esses. I can count on you guys to catch me adding throttle and lean as I tip back over in the opposite direction to exit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make that two for long corners. The larger they are the more lost I get visually especially at tracks where there's little in reference points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make that two for long corners. The larger they are the more lost I get visually especially at tracks where there's little in reference points.

 

Me three. Except that it needs to be changing radius turn or a turn where you need to vary your distance to the inside curb. If I just need to follow the inside curb, I'm all good :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Off -camber turns on the street make me nervous about lean angle, and traction. I try to hang off more to use less lean, but I don't feel very comfortable judging my entry speed for the turn.

 

On the flip side, I LOVE banked turns! I feel like I have so much traction it gives me a lot of confidence.

 

What about visual stuff like blind corners, or pavement patches that look like they could be slippery?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems we have a little consensus on the ones liked (and banked...gotta love those).

 

Long turns...so easy to get lost in!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blind corners don't really bother me at all. Once I have identified the exit I tend to "imagine" the exit and picture it in my mind even though it's not there yet visually. It takes a few laps of course. I find that many blind corners are some of my best ones as you have to think about them a bit more.

 

Here's something interesting as well. Corners that have challenged and that I initially hate eventually become my favorites once I have figured them out. They are the part of the track that I know 110% how I'm going to deal with them. The dread of approaching them and paying way more attention to myself while riding them eventually makes them become a lot of fun and extremely rewarding being able to go through fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you develop an approx. idea of the corner grip based on a visual of the asphalt?

I heard riders talking about some corners at my local track having less grip than others because of the way cars approach them. I could be very wrong but I think I saw a less rugged surface in some of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spaghetti. In one of Keith's books there's a quote "you have to learn to read pavement". It's 110% true but there's a catch like with everything else in life. :)

 

The catch of course is if you are no where near the limits of adhesion that pavement reading is only going to slow you down and get you involved in my favorite past time of over thinking things.

 

Because I'm no where near the limits of adhesion I go out of my way to try and ignore patches of pavement and pretend they aren't any different. When I notice some slight grip issues then I start paying attention and reading pavement. This approach of course requires a progressive and careful speed increase which is not always possible depending on your speed and the type of riding. Riding a brand new track in a race environment and ignoring the surface could have some not so good results. Also pay attention to what other riders are doing. If someone is blasting by you in a corner with spotty pavement using a different line try it and see what it does for you.

 

I try to keep in mind as well that "some" sliding is no problem at all. Staying calm and staying on the gas and a loss of traction is just an extra thrill. Your tires will give you feedback and tell you what's going on if you are listening. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...