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Throttle with brakes on

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Some say that in racing, the ideal is to just crack the throttle as you are easing off trail braking, with a short overlap period where you still have a touch of brake applied when you start opening the throttle ever so slightly. And that you can benefit using this technique also on the road, but of course at a much slower pace. The theory I was given was that this keeps the chassis settled due to smooth transitions of forces. If we brake, coast, then gas it, riding will be less fluent. Personally, I have never tried this, and I must admit it feels a bit daunting. 

What does the coaches and racers say?

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IIRC there was a video of Rossi describing the techniques. Personally, I didn’t find the particular video credible as I believed Rossi was practicing his art of chicanery.

YCRS instructors have been known to advocate the technique and they even have a drill where it makes it a proficiency goal.

In theory it sounds reasonable...then you get to the practicality of it.

With current engine management technology it is easier to make the transition smoother so as to keep a stable chassis- that is the goal, right? Isn’t this something we all practice in our riding, even when not specifically focusing on it?

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Picking up the throttle slightly at the end of the trail braking loads the rear tire and helps to stabilize the rear grip before accelerating. Like you wrote, overlapping the two controls also stabilizes the chassis on the transition. Of course there is a difference between picking up the gas slightly and cracking up the throttle when you are at lean.  

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The main advantage I see is pre-loading the rear sprocket, chain and rear suspension while the chassis is still pitching nose down due to deceleration.  The rear suspension remains more or less extended during the transition, rather than returning to normal after prior getting extended again under power.

The top leg of the chain is slacking while braking and the transition to power always has a shaking effect, plus some dead rotation of the sprocket (if some play exists between the rear sprocket and rubber connectors to the wheel).

That transition used to be less abrupt for carburated bikes than it is for the ones equipped with fuel injection (there is a time lapse after control input).

For street riding, it is safe to use the rear brake for that purpose, rather than simultaneously manipulating the throttle and front brake controls in a fine manner. 

 

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Anyone watch motoGP? Sometimes they have onboard video with lean/throttle/brake overlay.

I watch those very carefully, never once seen an overlap between braking and throttle. Not even when Rossi rides (because there are rumors he applies this technique of brakes and gas at the same time)

I have data from Xavi Vierge and he doesn't do it either. 

In theory I could understand the concept but the "juice is not worth the squeeze".

It's too distracting, and it could take away from your sensitivity on the brake lever if you are also trying to apply 5% throttle.

If you are not at the limit, and not going fast, you don't need sensitivity on the brake lever because you won't be using it anyway at high lean angles  right?

So when you get faster, you will find yourself with some light brakes at 48 deg lean, and if you press just a tiny bit more on the lever, your front end will close.

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On ‎3‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 7:56 AM, noamkrief said:

In theory I could understand the concept but the "juice is not worth the squeeze".

It's too distracting, and it could take away from your sensitivity on the brake lever if you are also trying to apply 5% throttle.

I agree with this 100%.

While it is sort of an interesting theoretical discussion, it would seem exceedingly difficult to apply in practice.

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The overlapping can only be with the rear brake. All flat track and cross riders use it extensively to maximize chassis stability and the traction/power delay is higher than on sport bikes.

I can't begin to imagine how to overlap the front brake lever and the throttle.

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I find it easy to do (with the front brake and throttle) on the road, but not sure my brain could cope when riding at the very limit.

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