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Wes- I hope you got what you needed from this thread and that it would be okay for me to leverage it to ask for help for my personal SR - at least the one I want to work on 1st (smile)...er this time around.

I have a tendency to grip the left bar too tight. No idea why, nor can I see an apparent pattern of when I do it most often. When I notice I’m gripping hard it is when I tell myself to relax because my hand is already tired.

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3 hours ago, Jaybird180 said:

Wes- I hope you got what you needed from this thread and that it would be okay for me to leverage it to ask for help for my personal SR - at least the one I want to work on 1st (smile).

I have a tendency to grip the left bar too tight. No idea why, nor can I see an apparent pattern of when I do it most often. When I notice I’m gripping hard it is when I tell myself to relax because my hand is already tired.

A few thoughts come to mind:

1) check your RIGHT hand - do you inadvertently push on the right side bar when rolling on the gas, and therefore have to push ALSO with the left to prevent the bars from turning?

2) Check the fit of your gloves, are they tight or restrictive?

3) Check your left-side body position (lower body particularly) to see if you are somehow forced into some tension in your left hand (feeling like you are slipping off, or having to hold yourself on), and check to see if you are twisting your body to one side - have someone look at you from behind to look for twisting or tension.

4) Per your other thread, are you tense in general on left hand turns, mentally worried about something?

5) Is there a lot of vibration in the bars? That can cause some mild numbing which can cause you to grip tighter which can lead to the sort of fatigue you mention. Some smaller bikes can transmit a LOT of buzzing in the bars, especially if the bars are lightweight and the grips are thin. The effect could be more prominent on the left hand because you are not moving it or repositioning it as often as the throttle hand.

 

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On ‎8‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 12:50 PM, faffi said:

That sounds right to me. As long as we are under control - and what we can control can be practiced and learned and expanded - we can act in a calculated way. But once you are out of control, you will revert to your personal SRs. With practice, and also personal abilities will help here, there is a grey zone where you are out of control, but still able to fight the SRs and act in a manner practiced. This could be looking into/around a corner despite the feeling of having entered too fast. However, if you enter way too fast, I reckon SRs will strike. For some, SRs will strike early and hard, others can be cooler customers. Still, at one stage I reckon panic will take over for everyone.

We can see this every now and then on TV even with the very best MotoGP racers, where they appear target fixate and go straight (off the road) when entering a corner too fast, even though it appears that the speed did get low enough to turn before they left the asphalt and hit the gravel. Then you have MM, who doesn't seem to have SRs at all 😁

I think so, too - if you go WAY past your limits and feel out of control I think the SRs are going to kick in hard. Keep in mind also that mental and physical state contribute to this, too - if a person is tired, dehydrated, lacking in sleep, hasn't eaten enough, etc. it affects mental focus and can definitely cause SRs to kick in earlier/harder and give the person less ability to combat them. Definitely something to keep in mind while riding, especially on very hot days or long rides.

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1 hour ago, Hotfoot said:

A few thoughts come to mind:

1) check your RIGHT hand - do you inadvertently push on the right side bar when rolling on the gas, and therefore have to push ALSO with the left to prevent the bars from turning?

2) Check the fit of your gloves, are they tight or restrictive?

3) Check your left-side body position (lower body particularly) to see if you are somehow forced into some tension in your left hand (feeling like you are slipping off, or having to hold yourself on), and check to see if you are twisting your body to one side - have someone look at you from behind to look for twisting or tension.

4) Per your other thread, are you tense in general on left hand turns, mentally worried about something?

5) Is there a lot of vibration in the bars? That can cause some mild numbing which can cause you to grip tighter which can lead to the sort of fatigue you mention. Some smaller bikes can transmit a LOT of buzzing in the bars, especially if the bars are lightweight and the grips are thin. The effect could be more prominent on the left hand because you are not moving it or repositioning it as often as the throttle hand.

 

1- I know that I used to do that. I don’t think I do that anymore.

2- My gloves are a good fit but I do like to fasten them snugly.

3- I’ll see if I can get someone to photograph me next time out.

4- Yes. I tend to crash on the left. This track is also left turn dominant.

5- I’ll pay more attention but it is a single cylinder. It’s pretty smooth but not as much as an I-4. The grips are new. I do tend to run lower gears getting more RPMs. I am working on figuring out my shift points but the track is so busy I’d be shifting too much but I do believe I can find good time by working that out.

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One issue we have seen with a rider preferring one side over the other, is on the "bad" side, they are doing something different.  If only doing it on the one side, and the bike is sound other wise, start looking at what they are doing differently on that side...a skilled coach helps here, as it can be 1/2 inch difference on body position can be the difference.

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I consulted with Dave Moss and he indicated that tires were nice and hot and pressure was good and it appears the rear moved around. He asked about suspension travel but I have no data on that, except the rearward geometry due to being undersprung (shame on me- I should have gotten a custom spring).

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