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  1. Lots of good data from some of you and especially Hotfoot’s info. Here’s just a bit more on the subject of Pivot Steering. May be repetitive of some data already written but look it over an do the experiment at the end for fun. My statement in Twist II about getting your weight closer to the center of mass or center of gravity by weighting the pegs rather than the seat and any implication that it alters the center of mass (COM) or center of gravity (COG) was, or helps in any way is, for lack of a better words, junk, incorrect, wrong. Weight in the seat or on the pegs does not change
    4 points
  2. Great to see the responses on this. Some years ago a coach missed T-boning a car at an intersection. This boulevard had a median, and tall curbing on the street-side edges. The car pulled across the median and then stopped in his lane. He steered quickly right, but had to also steer it back left (or hit that tall curbing). Both the visual skill (of not target fixing) and able to turn it quickly, are practiced skills, saved his bacon that day. It's a recommendation for simply getting onto a track now and again. Practicing riding technique in a controlled environment is ben
    3 points
  3. If you weren't excited and a bit nervous, you'd be a...non-human :).
    1 point
  4. This is actually a tough question to answer because it can depend on a LOT of variables (pressures, temps, suspension settings, tire fit to bike, riding style, etc.) and that is probably why you haven't seen much response. It does look like cold tear and it's interesting that it seems to be happening near where the tire changes from one compound (harder) to another (softer). Do you accelerate hard, in short bursts, with minimal lean angle? What is the tire size you are running, is it the same size as the OEM, or have you put on a wider tire? I agree with Yakaru that you should probably s
    1 point
  5. Faffi adds an excellent point; a little stiffness in the arms (a common in-too-fast survival reaction) will restrict bar movement, add load to the front, and potentially add some countersteering input that leans the bike over farther which can VERY easily overload a front tire that is already near the traction limit. Some braking references in Twist II that might help you (the OP) on info about leaned-over braking: Ch 24 Braking sections "Efficient Braking", "In-turn Brakes", "Crash Statistics", and "Brave or Smart". Also the chapters in Section II on "Rider Input" and Section III on
    1 point
  6. I am sorry to hear about your crash. I'm not sure what to say in response to your post; I am coach with a school and our absolute #1 priority is to keep riders from crashing. I know that in the classroom there is quite a bit of explanation about how to do the no-brakes drill. Riders are told that this is a drill and not a rule - riders may of course use the brakes if needed for safety, the brakes are not disabled and the only consequence of using the brakes during the drill is possibly a corner worker showing a blue flag to remind that rider about the drill. The point of the exercise is to foc
    1 point
  7. Basically, no, it is not ok to just add more braking if you are "too hot" into a turn and leaned way over, it would be a very dicey and delicate operation with a high likelihood of losing the front, it is VERY easy to blow past the traction limit or run out of ground clearance (hitting hard parts on the bike) doing that. Brakes should be tapering off as lean angle is increased, not the other way around. Yes, you will have to give up your line; if you are fully leaned into the corner and realize your entry speed was too high, it's too late to salvage your line. You will need to either let
    1 point
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