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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/17/2020 in all areas

  1. One drill we commonly use in Level 4 is "knee over curb". The idea is to find a point of reference other than your head/eyes to use, to judge distance to the inside edge of the corner. If you approach the corner with the idea that you are going to try to put your knee over the curb instead of positioning your head over it, you can see (looking at your photo) that your tires would be at least a foot closer to the inside, probably more. Another advantage of using your knee as your reference is that most riders can SEE their knee in their peripheral vision, which helps to judge position over the
    2 points
  2. So I've heard this discussed a number of times at the school, both for myself and other students: as you lean the head/eyes will be farther inside the corner than the tires. Intellectually I understand this pretty well but as my pace increases and being able to hit the apex tightly becomes more important I'm finding it's hard to accomplish in practice. While I could try and just slowly move my apex target point farther inside, it feels like this could end badly. For example, a corner without curbing to give feedback you've reached the final part of the usable pavement would mean risking h
    1 point
  3. I am no expert in any way on this, but I presume it is about awareness (where are you placed) and confidence (rely on your knowledge about where you are). Some are better at knowing where in space they are situated than others. Personally, I am hopeless, which is why I constantly bump into things. So I need some margins, likely more than you, to feel somewhat in control. Here are some pictures for inspiration about using all the available space, and then some, showing what is possible:
    1 point
  4. Lebedo; I wasn't worried about you stealing my stuff, everything in the books and videos is for riders to improve themselves, if you see better ways to instruct from the books and videos and you see it helping your students, I'm happy about that. The bike should not stand up once pressure is released after the counter-steering pressure is applied. If the rider is crossed up as you illustrate in the photo then it WILL have the tendency to stand up. This is possible. Also, riders often restrain the bars with the opposite hand e.g., press the right bar to turn right but their left
    1 point
  5. Lots of good data from some of you and especially Hotfoot’s info. Here’s just a bit more on the subject of Pivot Steering. May be repetitive of some data already written but look it over an do the experiment at the end for fun. My statement in Twist II about getting your weight closer to the center of mass or center of gravity by weighting the pegs rather than the seat and any implication that it alters the center of mass (COM) or center of gravity (COG) was, or helps in any way is, for lack of a better words, junk, incorrect, wrong. Weight in the seat or on the pegs does not change
    1 point
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