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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/27/2021 in Posts

  1. I missed going to the CSS for the last two years because I kept waiting on other people who refused to commit. This year I didn't even bother reaching out. Signing up today as soon as I have a couple of quick questions answered. Mostly just making sure a slot is available for me and determining if my wife can attend as a spectator. On the latter, just how that all works. Anyway, I'm beyond stoked about attending the school and lloking forward to getting some track time!
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  2. A philosopher by the name of Immanuel Kant (1726-1804) said that humans have knowledge that precedes and goes beyond their personal experiences. Motorcycle riders prove this to be true because they knew, before ever throwing a leg over a bike, that they’d love it. There is an inclination to try to categorize and define this bond. Shall we call riding an art, a passion, a skill, a compulsion, an instinct, a desire, an ego booster, sheer entertainment or simply a challenge? Celebrating my sixtieth year of riding, I still don’t know which it is and that doesn’t bother me. Why ride? The question has no practical significance, it is a moot point. I knew, from the first moment I considered it, as you probably did too, how it would, could or should feel. Riding fits into an already existing recess in our (riders’) souls, our urge to live, our sense of existence, our core aliveness, our essential being. Deny it at your own risk: enjoy it to your great happiness. Only one point should concern us: losing that sense of discovery. It’s that open, childlike view we must preserve where everything is fresh paint and dewy grass except you have a set of bars and a throttle in your paws and where each corner becomes an adventure and a world unto itself. I abandoned trying to discover “why I ride” long ago. Defining the qualities of a perfect ride; finding that groove where it all flows, where you are there but detached, where all things are obvious and yet simple keeps my passion alive. A good ride has qualities that transcend the moth-goes-to-flame category of experience. Here is a description of some of them that are on my list. I seek the perfect balance of focused but not too focused. Aware of what I am doing but not pushed into it like with my face pressed against a window. Focused more on a result than on the skills or technique I need to get the result. I have to be willing to crash but not have my attention on crashing. Keep my expectations of how well I'd like to, or think I should, be riding on the back burner. I’ve found there is a fine balance between taking small errors in stride and not feeling stuck with them but not ignoring them either; that’s a trick: I open up my mental riding software program which allows me to maintain enough free attention to identify an error and hit “save” so I can later make some decision on what I can do to correct it. Be willing to make changes but always keep in mind that sometimes a very slight change can make a world of difference. That means don’t be too darn greedy for change. Realize the instant that my focus is broken and either put it back together immediately or reduce my pace. On the track, I have to separate what a practice session is from a go-for-it session. Trying not to feel weird about it when someone quicker passes me is still a battle. I have to be willing to go slower to learn something new. Give any technique a fair chance of success and try it enough times to know if I can or cannot do it. I always accept coaching that I trust. I know that self- coaching is quirky; it’s easy to delude myself and miss what is important. Once I notice some little thing I’m doing I try to discover what it is. I keep in mind that riding is a universe unto itself and being a universe it has limitless opportunities to discover its intricacies and one’s own connection to them. With all of that in place, I have a great ride. What’s on your list? Keith Code PS: We still have some open spots for our Las Vegas schools in October and November. Weather is usually perfect at that time of year in Vegas. Check out the schedule here. Copyright 2017, Keith Code, all rights reserved.
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  3. Keith you've expressed this as only you can. Thank you - it says everything I feel whenever I throw a leg over my bike. At 81 I still become giddy when I/m going for a ride. I didn't start riding until I was 50. I've never stopped and don't plan on stopping until I/m unable to ride any longer. Thanks so much for all the pleasure your sessions have added to my thrill of riding. I can say without hesitation I/m riding better now than I've ever ridden. I can say without hesitation I owe much of it to you and your incredible program and staff. Best, Steve Berde
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  4. I've done the Barber Motorsport Park and Las Vegas track twice now. I love those 2 tracks in my short riding experience with CSS, but I can say unequivocally that The Ridge is my favorite track now. Heard many say, that The Ridge is Barber on steroids and I agree. I will be back next year for sure.
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  5. I just completed a Washington State DOL motorcycle safety survey. Multiple choice, asking about experience, training, years riding, accident history, etc. One of the reasons I completed the survey was that they give you the current average response chart after you complete the survey. One statistic jumped off the page. over 50% of respondents stated that the main cause of motorcycle accidents was inattention of OTHER DRIVERS. Over half of all respondents believe that the main cause of motorcycle accidents is out of their hands. It's fate, and it's up to the performance of other people. If I believed that, I would sell my bikes today and never ride again. I believe my life is in my hands, and that choices I make on the road are 100% in my control. One of my principle reasons for coming to CSS was to clean up my own bad habits and misconceptions and to point me in the right direction for continued improvement. I can report that this training has actually saved me from myself on a few occasions, and certainly given me better insight into how my motorcycle interacts with the riding environment. A few specifics: Where is the actual limit of control? What is '80%'? and how do you know how much margin you have left? When you are at speed, and committed to a line, how can you make fast changes without crossing the line into uncontrolled flight? The road is not the track, and in theory we should not exceed the limits of control on civilian roadways, but if you put in unpredictable road surfaces, other vehicles, road hazards, and wildlife, you now have an environment where the same skills you need at high speed are required to survive slow to medium velocity travel. So, this is my plug for CSS. We all want to learn to get around the track faster every lap. There are few things better than that. Control is control, and CSS training is absolutely 100% an improvement in your understanding of what control is and how to get it. We also need to learn how to read traffic, observe changes in the riding ecosystem, and learn to pay attention and stay focused. All necessary life skills, but it's all just information that allows us to choose and act. CSS will help you learn how to take action so you can come back to the track in one piece.
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  6. That is a thoughtful and well-stated analysis! Very well done on the no-crash record, in all those days. The philosophy of working on technique first and adding speed later is very smart. I bet you would be back up to speed faster than you think, if you start with a couple of CSS days. Personally I feel a LOT less pressure to "go fast" at a CSS school day than I do at an open track day, which makes it a lot easier to make improvements and get up to speed using good technique, with fewer distractions and errors, resulting in more gains and lasting improvements.
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  7. Worth bumping up, for all to read again. Enjoy!
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