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  1. Lots of good data from some of you and especially Hotfoot’s info. Here’s just a bit more on the subject of Pivot Steering. May be repetitive of some data already written but look it over an do the experiment at the end for fun. My statement in Twist II about getting your weight closer to the center of mass or center of gravity by weighting the pegs rather than the seat and any implication that it alters the center of mass (COM) or center of gravity (COG) was, or helps in any way is, for lack of a better words, junk, incorrect, wrong. Weight in the seat or on the pegs does not change
    6 points
  2. This thread started me thinking. Dangerous, I know. Some riders, very good ones, claim they just know where the tires are and can hit a tight apex. I can't but I'm happy for them. Knee to curb is workable, or, more descriptively, Knee Over Curb. 9 out of 10 students reap substantial improvements with that drill. AS Hofoot said, she can't see the tank on her small bike and if body position is good, with head low and turned in to the corner, it may be similar on a big bike. The more "GP" the body position the less tank you'll see. One other thing just struck me as a possible
    4 points
  3. Great to see the responses on this. Some years ago a coach missed T-boning a car at an intersection. This boulevard had a median, and tall curbing on the street-side edges. The car pulled across the median and then stopped in his lane. He steered quickly right, but had to also steer it back left (or hit that tall curbing). Both the visual skill (of not target fixing) and able to turn it quickly, are practiced skills, saved his bacon that day. It's a recommendation for simply getting onto a track now and again. Practicing riding technique in a controlled environment is ben
    4 points
  4. This is a very broad question. The answer will depend on a variety of factors about the corner: radius (and whether it is increasing, decreasing, or staying the same), camber, surface (grip, bumps, etc.) so I am not sure what sort of answer you are hoping we can provide. If the radius of the corner is increasing, and the camber is either unchanging or getting more favorable, you should be able to accelerate through the corner, however if the radius is decreasing and/or the surface is going off-camber, you may have to be slower later in the corner instead of faster. A corner with a crest i
    4 points
  5. Whew, this thread has gone all over creation and back since the original posted question, and the OP seems to have checked out. So, I'm going to jump in here. I am a CSS coach. First let me note that Yakaru is a very competent rider, fast, has come to many schools, and is very knowledgeable on the material. Now, on to some of the info that is in question. 1) When a rider is in a corner, if the throttle is APRUPTLY shut off, the bike will INITIALLY stand up a bit and run wide. Sudden loading of the front tire creates drag on the inside of the contact patch which tries to turn the
    4 points
  6. One drill we commonly use in Level 4 is "knee over curb". The idea is to find a point of reference other than your head/eyes to use, to judge distance to the inside edge of the corner. If you approach the corner with the idea that you are going to try to put your knee over the curb instead of positioning your head over it, you can see (looking at your photo) that your tires would be at least a foot closer to the inside, probably more. Another advantage of using your knee as your reference is that most riders can SEE their knee in their peripheral vision, which helps to judge position over the
    3 points
  7. Hanging off moves the combined center of gravity of bike and rider more to the inside which allows the bike itself to be leaned over less. With the bike more upright, the suspension works much more efficiently which improves traction by keeping more of the tire in contact with the road.
    3 points
  8. I haven't watched the video but I HAVE experienced noticeable changes in handling as a result of changing tires (brand or size), and after a few of those experiences I now pick a brand and size of tire and set up the bike for THOSE tires and stay with them. If I need to change to a different brand or size of tires, I am prepared to start all over on suspension settings and bike setup. Changing to a different model or size of tires can change how the suspension feels - is the tire stiffer than the prior one? Does it have a different profile shape that affects the turn in and steering chara
    2 points
  9. Ready to ride? I just found out there are a few spots still available for the March 18-19 2 Day Camp at Streets of Willow. It's a rare opportunity to jump in last-minute, schools normally sell out far in advance. I'll be there, I can hardly wait! Sign up, come on out, tell your friends.
    2 points
  10. I joined the forum a few days back but forgot to introduce myself. I'm Chad James and I live in New York now. I'm passionate about automobiles and own a KTM 790 Adventure R, which I take to places on weekends.
    2 points
  11. "An accurate orientation in space begins with two external Reference Points. We find two points or objects or areas first and this then gives us a reckoning of our own location where we become the third point of orientation. Together, that creates an accurate tracking of the direction of our progress in relation to the other two. With those three, our eyes begin to create 3D space, which in turn improves our perception of relative speed and direction of travel. Also, and importantly, our sense of time and timing switches on quite automatically. In short, RPs help us create perspective." - Keit
    2 points
  12. Sometimes, it is best to hurry slowly in order to reach the destination the quickest. Take care of your body and let it heal at its own rate, pushing it towards, but never beyond the limits it sets 😉 Hope you get back to full health!
    2 points
  13. I liked the sound of this too so thought I would try it out before writing. I like the idea of using the outside peg to 'triangulate' a point of the tyres' contact patches to the peg, to create a better idea of where the bike is placed, pretty much as El Colibri found. Also, that our awareness of using that outside peg should already be 'switched on' if we are pivot steering (which I assume we are). As it's new to me, I did find my attention was then slightly focussed at the rear of the bike, which then felt like it was playing catchup as the bike moves forward - perhaps this is just ho
    2 points
  14. apparently the Suzuki Boys will take the cake home. Happy for them.
    2 points
  15. The best pressure setting can vary by bike/rider weight, by track, and by temperature and is not always the easiest thing to figure out. Best thing to do (assuming you are talking about track riding) is to ask the Pirelli race tire distributor, and be specific about what bike you have, what pace you ride (A, B or C group at local trackdays, for example, or tell them your typical laptimes), and whether it is expected to be cold or hot out. The Pirelli range given above is a good starting point; if you see any abnormal tire wear (tearing, or uneven wear) occurring, you can ask a tire provi
    2 points
  16. They have full gear, so the same undersuit suggestion applies to women as men. as for school vs camp: I get a lot more from the camps, personally, and favor them for the increased time per day on the track to refine things. But it’s something I can see others wanting more “processing time” for the lessons or not physically prepared for two full days of riding having the opposite opinion. In the end though I’d say it’s probably not a drastic difference either way — both will be effective so pick the one that you think sounds more appealing or fits your schedule better.
    2 points
  17. I was so happy to find out, today, that A Twist of the Wrist II is available on Amazon Prime Video now! You can watch it instantly, here is a link to it on Amazon Video (or you can just put A Twist of the Wrist in the search box) : https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B089ZNVBW9/ref=atv_dp_share_cu_r And since we're talking about the movie, what was your favorite part? I can't wait to hear what y'all liked best. My favorite part is the CG animation and explanation of why using the front brake in a corner tends to make the bike stand up, it was BY FAR the clearest explanation I
    2 points
  18. Faffi adds an excellent point; a little stiffness in the arms (a common in-too-fast survival reaction) will restrict bar movement, add load to the front, and potentially add some countersteering input that leans the bike over farther which can VERY easily overload a front tire that is already near the traction limit. Some braking references in Twist II that might help you (the OP) on info about leaned-over braking: Ch 24 Braking sections "Efficient Braking", "In-turn Brakes", "Crash Statistics", and "Brave or Smart". Also the chapters in Section II on "Rider Input" and Section III on
    2 points
  19. I have the Kindle edition, here is a link for Twist II for Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/Twist-Wrist-II-High-Performance-Motorcycle-ebook/dp/B00F8IN5K6 and here is a link for A Twist of the Wrist (Twist I), it is available on Kindle also: https://www.amazon.com/Twist-Wrist-Motorcycle-Racers-Handbook-ebook/dp/B00BNFIU08/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1593622442&sr=1-2 I love having these, because I can search for a word of phrase electronically to go right to the info I want. And it's great to be able to pull up the books on my iPhone Kindle App, at the tra
    2 points
  20. Yes, riding the NO B/S Bike with Josh Galster behind me...outright terrifying. Let's the stage: Josh was a pretty solid AMA Pro, racing 600 Supersport at the time, good rider. We were on the NO B/S Bike, and came pretty close to the camera car (seemed way closer on the bike than it does in the video). At what seemed like the last possible moment Josh would reach down with his thumb and steer the bike away from the car. What you might not be able to see is how hard I was pressing on the NO B/S bars--surprised they didn't bend. Veins popping out of my neck, trying to steer the bike (w
    2 points
  21. That movie changed my life. I had been riding (commuting) about 5 or 6 months when I figured I was ready to ride some twisty roads. So I went out and scared myself pretty bad. The bike wouldn't turn, I was crossing the yellow repeatedly, my wrists hurt from my death grip on the bars, etc. Every corner was terrifying; a "mild panic" as they say in the movie. It was a bad day. Then I found TOTW2 and I felt like Keith had just watched me ride and was going over my mistakes, one by one. The entire movie was a series of "ah-ha!" moments. Everything was explained so well. Now I've done a bunch of sc
    2 points
  22. 2 points
  23. A lot of this has to do with the specifics of the corner but for the general approach: - You usually want to shift the weight balance forward to change direction. Depending on the bike and corner this can vary from a pause in the roll on, a partial roll off, a complete roll off (preferably with intent, not just chopping the throttle), or application of the brakes. - Once on line you roll back on, moving the weight back, stabilizing the bike. Again depending on the corner and bike the nature of this can vary. There's a corner at one of my local tracks which, on a 250cc bike, I do
    2 points
  24. Sorry to hear about the down. I think Apollo has the core of it, and if your lecturer didn't say to obviously use the brakes if you needed then that does seem to be an oversight. I'll put a clip in at the end from the Superbike UK's level 1 presentation -- should jump to 18:16 -- which is the clearest explanation of 'how' and 'why' to do the drill (including using the brakes if you must). In my experience, the no-brake drill is best approached in a stepwise manner and helps tune entry speed and understanding of slowing from things other than the brakes (tire drag, lean angle, engine
    2 points
  25. I'm pretty happy. Got to grow my trophy case a bit.
    2 points
  26. Being a mediocre rider with a history of more brawn than brains, I have had to stand the bike up to slow down before continuing at a reduced pace countless times. Sometimes from running out of cornering clearance, sometimes just running out of courage. I have never planned for it or practiced it, it's just a result of my SR.
    2 points
  27. I'll pass on that feedback, it might make sense to resurrect that forum section. From participating in some other forums I DO understand the questions/concerns that arise when you don't know the sources of the information you get. This particular thread covered a whole lot of ground in a short amount of time, and got confusing, but from what I saw most of what was said was correct in one way or another, just incomplete or stated in a way that was not absolutely clear. Perfect example is the question of what happens when you roll off the throttle in a turn - one person said the bike stands
    2 points
  28. I think we need to clarify whether we are talking about "weighting" the outside peg or talking about PRESSING on the peg. Pressing down on the peg with your muscles to force you knee up into/against the tank can improve your lock on and that is a nice benefit. Using the outside lower leg as a strength base for pivot steering is not weighting the peg, it is using the peg as the most stable pivot point. (Just standing on the peg doesn't work for pivot steering because that is not the same as locking your lower leg to the bike.) If a rider senses an improvement in the bike's handli
    2 points
  29. Personally, I prefer a softer carcass and a more rounded profile for the tire. That's partly because I am a smaller rider and most bike's suspensions are too stiff for me anyway so the softer tire helps absorb some of that, but it is also because I like to feel the tire react - I like to feel the tire "set" in the corner, and feel it compress under acceleration. I do not like to feel rigidity or vibrations, or feel like the tire isn't reacting or won't compress, that sort of feedback tends to make me feel like the tire is cold or has too much air pressure and won't have adequate grip, so I am
    2 points
  30. We are shooting for Barber, which is May 23-29. It's mostly booked up but there are about 10% seats available.
    2 points
  31. We made it out, about 2 hours north of LA in the desert. Had a great time, daughter loved it--asking about going again this coming weekend!
    2 points
  32. New2mac, welcome to the forum. I’d say that the skills learned at the school are very easily transferable back to your bike on the street. My first time at the school was on a school bike and I had no issues taking what I learned out to the street on my bike. I don’t know that it’s necessarily ’better’ to mix it up and learn on different bikes. I can imagine for some, getting on a sport bike when never having ridden one before may actually take away from focusing on the drills in each session (a lot of attention *could* necessarily go toward just getting accustomed to a new/different
    1 point
  33. For the camp obviously there is the school provided bike. I’ve got my s1000rr and hp4 both already there; and as much as I’d love to bring one of my small bikes I need the trailer space free to bring those back home after. Cobie recommended the s1000 for the tryout.
    1 point
  34. Been months since I've ridden anything but my dirt bike (that's been fun), so ready to ride. Anyone going to join us in Vegas in Feb?
    1 point
  35. Hi guys, I hope you're all doing good. My name is Olivier, and I'm a riding instructor in France. I never took a CSS class, as we don't have a French CSS. But I read the books, watched the videos and been lurking on the forum. This one is the best I've ever seen on motorcycle riding. I trully believe that the techniques described by Keith can be used on the road. I had a flash yesterday. Correct me if I'm wrong, but PS is not rotating around your knee: it's all about pushing your body forward, isn't it? Thanks and have a good day.
    1 point
  36. And does it make it harder for the others to get around you...
    1 point
  37. I agree, I almost exclusively ride on the street now but have atleast 100,000 miles of racing and track riding under my belt, and all my riding I do now I only do it for fun not commuting. Safety is always the top prioroty for me but that said I have still managed to hit 7 deer on my motorcycles over the years, twice ending up in the emergency room for atleast a week each. maybe at 58 now, my visual skills and reaction times are not as good as they once were but I am positive they are still better than almost everyone I ride with, as I observe many of their riding behaviors and reac
    1 point
  38. What IS the purpose of the discussion, if you are not interested in handling issues? If this is a purely theoretical discussion and not directly related to real world riding, this is probably not the right forum for that sort of discussion.
    1 point
  39. Hi all, Well life has done what it does and kept me off motorcycles for the last 2 years... before that I'd only done track riding for 3-4 years and had done up to Level 3, made some really good progress and found myself in the fastest group at track days. I did a double track day in early September at basically a new track (I'd ridden it once 5-6 years ago), honestly didn't think it would take me that long to get back up to speed but I wasn't doing as well as I'd hoped and probably had unrealistic expectations of being able to just get back into it. Add into the mix that I've put
    1 point
  40. If you weren't excited and a bit nervous, you'd be a...non-human :).
    1 point
  41. For the 2 day camps basically everything is provided including helmet. Bring a well rested body and an undersuit and you're set. Obviously any gear of your own that you brought is open for you to use but you don't need it.
    1 point
  42. When you were trail braking could your brake release have been a little too quick or your rebound too soft? When the brake is released abruptly the forks will extend, making the bike suddenly run wide, which would change your line AND force you to have to delay the throttle until the bike came back around to your desired line. It can be really hard, when trail braking, to get the brake release slow and gradual enough to avoid that. Additionally, it is much harder to precisely judge entry speed when braking late/trail braking versus setting the entry speed earlier and using less (or no) b
    1 point
  43. Definitely a mint condition NSR250/RS250R GP bike. Ultimate lightweight track toy.
    1 point
  44. Great meeting you too! And again, thanks for making me feel welcome. I'll probably head out west next season - just to get something different, but Barbers is just too local to ignore. Maybe both? Lol
    1 point
  45. If the speed was high and the line was bad, and you had pavement left to use, could you stand the bike up, brake hard, then steer the bike again? Could you, at that new, significantly reduced speed (because you had applied brakes hard) now turn the bike in a sharper arc than you could have achieved at the higher speed, where you might have run out of traction or ground clearance? Clearly I am talking about a relatively extreme example, but could you, if needed, handle the problem that way? As far as "maintenance throttle" as a term, I just wanted to clarify your interpretation. It is
    1 point
  46. There's a whole bunch of wrong in this posting.......Cobie...could you chime in..please!!
    1 point
  47. Hi Jeremy, So let's clarify, ,just to be 100% clear for eveyrone: what does a rider do in a turn to get the bike to tighten the line? Best, Cobie
    1 point
  48. I'm SOOOO looking forward to getting on my dirt bike tomorrow! Hope you get some moto time in soon
    1 point
  49. I'm a big fan of small, lightweight bikes. To me it seems pretty hard to explore many of the capabilities of a 1000cc (or even a 600cc) sport bike on public roads. You can barely get to third gear. I picked up a Kawasaki Z125 recently and I am having a blast with it. Street legal, but in ten minutes I can have the headlight, taillight and blinkers off it and it's ready for the go-kart track. Is the handling amazing? No, but it isn't bad and it IS fun to ride. It is NOT a highway bike and has a low top speed but if you ride it at 30-40 mph you feel like you are really riding, on the S1000r
    1 point
  50. Speed and Direction When riders say they would like to increase their confidence and control, what do they mean? Aside from pleasing the eye and entertaining discussions about them, all motorcycles have the same six controls–throttle, front brake, rear brake, clutch, gear lever and handle bars. Those six controls are how we change or maintain the speed and the direction of the bike. And, that is all they do and it is all you do while riding. Good control amounts to correctly choosing where and how much you change the speed and direction of the bike. Likewise, any and all decisions yo
    1 point
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