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  1. Lots of good data from some of you and especially Hotfoot’s info. Here’s just a bit more on the subject of Pivot Steering. May be repetitive of some data already written but look it over an do the experiment at the end for fun. My statement in Twist II about getting your weight closer to the center of mass or center of gravity by weighting the pegs rather than the seat and any implication that it alters the center of mass (COM) or center of gravity (COG) was, or helps in any way is, for lack of a better words, junk, incorrect, wrong. Weight in the seat or on the pegs does not change the COG of you or the bike, at all. If you could move your body's mass lower than the seat or tank, it would but it has to be the mass changing position, not where the mass is connected to the bike. Putting more weight on one or another peg is only changing its connection point. If you weight one peg you will go lighter in the seat and un-weight the other peg some. A very slight weight imbalance may occur but it has little, or no, effect on the bike’s direction. When a bad passenger leans the “wrong” way, the rider must compensate by leaning the bike over more to stay on line. The COG of the passenger becomes offset from the bike’s COG and it must be leaned more to balance out the offset-from-center COG. The same goes for riders who hang their bum way off but leave their torsos crossed up, on the other side of the bikes center line. The benefit of the bum off the one side is neutralized by the torso mass being crossed to the other side or staying in the middle. In a straight line, moving your body’s mass over to the side, as in preparing the hung off riding position, creates a weight and COG imbalance. The bike veers toward the hung off side’s direction, slightly, not enough to turn into any corner on a race track at speed but does work on the road in some sweeping corners–at road speeds. Pivot steering, as many have pointed out, has nothing to do with the weight on the outside peg. The peg is used as a push–off/pivot point. The weight on it has no measurable effect on the bikes balance. The thigh/knee are driven up and into the tank from the peg by doing a ‘calf raise’, pivoting off the peg. For pressing, or for pull-plus-press steering, there is no more stable or stronger body position than the Pivot Steering technique. This is easily demonstrated. Have a friend hold a small bathroom scale flat up against the wall. Stand in front of it and line up your right arm with the scale. Plant both feet solidly about footpeg width, about 2 feet from the wall. Press on the scale with your right palm as hard as you can. Get the reading. With feet in the same position, shift all your weight onto the right foot and then press as hard as you can on the scale with the right hand again. Get the reading. Finally, pivot all your weight from your left foot and press on the scale. The last will be the highest reading by a substantial margin. That is one of the benefits of Pivot Steering, maximum strength which also tells you it is the most stable body position possible for counter steering. The weighting of pegs in off road conditions was mentioned for traversing across slanted ground. In that scenario, the rider’s body mass also changes position in order to weight the peg and that shifts the combined COG to their benefit.
    6 points
  2. This thread started me thinking. Dangerous, I know. Some riders, very good ones, claim they just know where the tires are and can hit a tight apex. I can't but I'm happy for them. Knee to curb is workable, or, more descriptively, Knee Over Curb. 9 out of 10 students reap substantial improvements with that drill. AS Hofoot said, she can't see the tank on her small bike and if body position is good, with head low and turned in to the corner, it may be similar on a big bike. The more "GP" the body position the less tank you'll see. One other thing just struck me as a possible device for estimating the location of the tires in a corner. It's the position of your outside foot. Look at Yakaru's shot at Streets, or any shot in the thread, the outside foot is very close to being perfectly over the rear contact patch, not quite directly over it but that would give you a safety margin if it was a help. I say "if it was a help" because I have no idea if this would work for anyone. You could call it a research project at this point and I hope to try it out for myself as well. Keith
    4 points
  3. Great to see the responses on this. Some years ago a coach missed T-boning a car at an intersection. This boulevard had a median, and tall curbing on the street-side edges. The car pulled across the median and then stopped in his lane. He steered quickly right, but had to also steer it back left (or hit that tall curbing). Both the visual skill (of not target fixing) and able to turn it quickly, are practiced skills, saved his bacon that day. It's a recommendation for simply getting onto a track now and again. Practicing riding technique in a controlled environment is beneficial all by itself (and we'd say with some good coaching even better :). But even if one doesn't get some coaching, but gets onto a track now and again, this will help to keep one's margin for street riding a little more comfortable. Same coach told us after his first endurance race, his next street ride felt in slow motion. An incident that would have before been a panic, was now a yawn. Do I sound like a track proponent? Best, Cobie
    4 points
  4. One drill we commonly use in Level 4 is "knee over curb". The idea is to find a point of reference other than your head/eyes to use, to judge distance to the inside edge of the corner. If you approach the corner with the idea that you are going to try to put your knee over the curb instead of positioning your head over it, you can see (looking at your photo) that your tires would be at least a foot closer to the inside, probably more. Another advantage of using your knee as your reference is that most riders can SEE their knee in their peripheral vision, which helps to judge position over the curb. Having said that, I personally am pretty short so my knee doesn't stick out very far (so it is harder to see) and my knee position is not super consistent because on my small, lightweight low HP racebike I sometimes keep my knee tucked in for faster corners to reduce wind drag and/or lock on more solidly. So, per a suggestion from my Level 4 consultant, I started using the gas tank as my reference. I try to put the gas tank over the curb. It helps mainly because I can know with CERTAINTY that when I am leaned over, I can safely get the tank over the curb without worrying about hitting it (or the dirt, or ragged edge of track) that I DON'T want to hit at full lean. It gets me a lot closer without having any attention on worrying about hitting the curb. Since your height is, I think, similar to mine and I know you sometimes ride a lightweight bike, using the tank might be something to try.
    3 points
  5. I haven't watched the video but I HAVE experienced noticeable changes in handling as a result of changing tires (brand or size), and after a few of those experiences I now pick a brand and size of tire and set up the bike for THOSE tires and stay with them. If I need to change to a different brand or size of tires, I am prepared to start all over on suspension settings and bike setup. Changing to a different model or size of tires can change how the suspension feels - is the tire stiffer than the prior one? Does it have a different profile shape that affects the turn in and steering characteristics? Does it support you differently under hard braking, or during trail braking? - and different tires (even ones that are supposed to be the same nominal size) can have differing widths which can affect the fit of tire to rim or whether the tire will rub the chain or different heights which can change the attitude of the bike. If you changed your front tire and the new one had a little less height than the prior one, it would effectively lower your front end which can affect handling, making the bike steer in more easily but feel less stable. Or if the new tire is taller it could make the bike feel more sluggish to steer but more stable in a straight line. Different stiffness/softness of the carcass changes the steering and suspension feel and the tire's profile changes the feel in the corners, too. At a minimum, if I changed tire models or sizes, I would measure the ride height before and after the tire change and adjust the forks or rear shock to get the bike back to the ride height and attitude that it had prior to the change. I'd also research the design info on the new tires - are they race oriented? Stiffer than the prior model? Is the profile more V shaped than the prior model? - so I have an idea of what might change in the handling and have a plan for how to adjust the bike settings to suit.
    2 points
  6. Ready to ride? I just found out there are a few spots still available for the March 18-19 2 Day Camp at Streets of Willow. It's a rare opportunity to jump in last-minute, schools normally sell out far in advance. I'll be there, I can hardly wait! Sign up, come on out, tell your friends.
    2 points
  7. Worth bumping up, for all to read again. Enjoy!
    2 points
  8. I joined the forum a few days back but forgot to introduce myself. I'm Chad James and I live in New York now. I'm passionate about automobiles and own a KTM 790 Adventure R, which I take to places on weekends.
    2 points
  9. "An accurate orientation in space begins with two external Reference Points. We find two points or objects or areas first and this then gives us a reckoning of our own location where we become the third point of orientation. Together, that creates an accurate tracking of the direction of our progress in relation to the other two. With those three, our eyes begin to create 3D space, which in turn improves our perception of relative speed and direction of travel. Also, and importantly, our sense of time and timing switches on quite automatically. In short, RPs help us create perspective." - Keith, in his article Time, Space and Speed "As I have seen with lots of top riders, their biggest ongoing breakthroughs come in their ability to use their visual abilities, their perception of location." - Keith, in You and Valentino Rossi The more I learn about riding and the more time I spend on track (not nearly enough), the more I realize how fundamentally important it is to have good visual skills and a good sense of speed. I like this video clip because it illustrates that where you look has a big effect on your sense of speed and space. I very much look forward to running some more visual drills with CSS in 2021.
    2 points
  10. Sometimes, it is best to hurry slowly in order to reach the destination the quickest. Take care of your body and let it heal at its own rate, pushing it towards, but never beyond the limits it sets 😉 Hope you get back to full health!
    2 points
  11. I liked the sound of this too so thought I would try it out before writing. I like the idea of using the outside peg to 'triangulate' a point of the tyres' contact patches to the peg, to create a better idea of where the bike is placed, pretty much as El Colibri found. Also, that our awareness of using that outside peg should already be 'switched on' if we are pivot steering (which I assume we are). As it's new to me, I did find my attention was then slightly focussed at the rear of the bike, which then felt like it was playing catchup as the bike moves forward - perhaps this is just how my faulty cerebrum is wired! But will keep at it... I have used the 'tank over curb' before on the track, but found it takes up too much attention on the street. Admittedly, I am 5'11" on a small 300 so I do need to glance down to see the tank.
    2 points
  12. apparently the Suzuki Boys will take the cake home. Happy for them.
    2 points
  13. The best pressure setting can vary by bike/rider weight, by track, and by temperature and is not always the easiest thing to figure out. Best thing to do (assuming you are talking about track riding) is to ask the Pirelli race tire distributor, and be specific about what bike you have, what pace you ride (A, B or C group at local trackdays, for example, or tell them your typical laptimes), and whether it is expected to be cold or hot out. The Pirelli range given above is a good starting point; if you see any abnormal tire wear (tearing, or uneven wear) occurring, you can ask a tire provider or suspension person for guidance, or if you want to look into it yourself, Google Dave Moss, he has lots of videos about tire wear and suspension that can help you "read" the tire to try to figure out what is happening. If none of that is available, as a rough guide try starting out around 30-31 psi cold (which should go up to around 33-34 hot) on the front, and if the ride feels harsh or the tire doesn't seem to grip as well as you'd like (especially over rough pavement), try 1-2 PSI lower and see if that helps. If the front feels mushy and sluggish to steer, try going a few psi higher.
    2 points
  14. They have full gear, so the same undersuit suggestion applies to women as men. as for school vs camp: I get a lot more from the camps, personally, and favor them for the increased time per day on the track to refine things. But it’s something I can see others wanting more “processing time” for the lessons or not physically prepared for two full days of riding having the opposite opinion. In the end though I’d say it’s probably not a drastic difference either way — both will be effective so pick the one that you think sounds more appealing or fits your schedule better.
    2 points
  15. Keith you've expressed this as only you can. Thank you - it says everything I feel whenever I throw a leg over my bike. At 81 I still become giddy when I/m going for a ride. I didn't start riding until I was 50. I've never stopped and don't plan on stopping until I/m unable to ride any longer. Thanks so much for all the pleasure your sessions have added to my thrill of riding. I can say without hesitation I/m riding better now than I've ever ridden. I can say without hesitation I owe much of it to you and your incredible program and staff. Best, Steve Berde
    1 point
  16. I've done the Barber Motorsport Park and Las Vegas track twice now. I love those 2 tracks in my short riding experience with CSS, but I can say unequivocally that The Ridge is my favorite track now. Heard many say, that The Ridge is Barber on steroids and I agree. I will be back next year for sure.
    1 point
  17. I just completed a Washington State DOL motorcycle safety survey. Multiple choice, asking about experience, training, years riding, accident history, etc. One of the reasons I completed the survey was that they give you the current average response chart after you complete the survey. One statistic jumped off the page. over 50% of respondents stated that the main cause of motorcycle accidents was inattention of OTHER DRIVERS. Over half of all respondents believe that the main cause of motorcycle accidents is out of their hands. It's fate, and it's up to the performance of other people. If I believed that, I would sell my bikes today and never ride again. I believe my life is in my hands, and that choices I make on the road are 100% in my control. One of my principle reasons for coming to CSS was to clean up my own bad habits and misconceptions and to point me in the right direction for continued improvement. I can report that this training has actually saved me from myself on a few occasions, and certainly given me better insight into how my motorcycle interacts with the riding environment. A few specifics: Where is the actual limit of control? What is '80%'? and how do you know how much margin you have left? When you are at speed, and committed to a line, how can you make fast changes without crossing the line into uncontrolled flight? The road is not the track, and in theory we should not exceed the limits of control on civilian roadways, but if you put in unpredictable road surfaces, other vehicles, road hazards, and wildlife, you now have an environment where the same skills you need at high speed are required to survive slow to medium velocity travel. So, this is my plug for CSS. We all want to learn to get around the track faster every lap. There are few things better than that. Control is control, and CSS training is absolutely 100% an improvement in your understanding of what control is and how to get it. We also need to learn how to read traffic, observe changes in the riding ecosystem, and learn to pay attention and stay focused. All necessary life skills, but it's all just information that allows us to choose and act. CSS will help you learn how to take action so you can come back to the track in one piece.
    1 point
  18. Hello forum members, We have received a number of reports of a user sending some individual private messages that are spam. The user has been marked as a spammer and banned, and the content has been removed. Thank you to those of you that reported the junk messages. If you received a message notification but cannot view the message, it is because it was junk content was removed. User reports helped us to identify the problem and rectify it very quickly so thank you for your assistance in protecting our forum
    1 point
  19. Looking forward to the Two-Day Camp (Level-4) at VIR, May 5-6, 2021
    1 point
  20. Is it better to learn on your own bike on the track, or is it better to mix it up and learn on a different bike like the s1000rr? I’m currently riding a Triumph Bonneville with some performance and suspension upgrades here and there. I love this bike and currently do not have any plans to pursue a street bike. And my goal for the course is to be a better street rider on the twisties. Should I be concerned about transferring what I learn from a type of bike I probably won’t ride except for this course? Of course, I can bring the Bonnie for the 1-Day course but I’m worried I’ll show up with an inappropriate bike for the track. Any thoughts?
    1 point
  21. Hi and welcome! El Colibri covered it quite extensively above. I would add that my first time at the school I used their bike but was apprehensive about riding a sportsbike as I thought it may detract from the learning experience, but they are excellent and surprisingly user-friendly ("pussycat" was the term used!) This was the previous generation S1000RR - maybe someone else on here who has ridden the 2020 version has feedback on it? During the first couple of sessions the bike is in 'Rain' mode (reduced power, more forgiving throttle response) and the option to move it up to 'Sport' mode is available later on but, to be honest, I left it in 'Rain' all day long during level one and two and got on perfectly with it. With regards to the skills learned on a sports machine, they do transfer easily to other bikes and I've put them into practice on various ones - Bonneville, ADV's, Enduro, Vintage and my 300 single. Alternatively, you are familiar with your own bike so don't have to adjust to another one - there is no such thing as the 'wrong bike'!😉
    1 point
  22. El Colibri, wow. Thank you for taking the time for the reply. This is great stuff to think about.
    1 point
  23. Less rake and less trail would make the motorcycle easier to steer into the corner, the front wheel will respond more quickly to steering change. "More stable" generally refers to straight-line stability - the bike is less reactive to accidental steering inputs, steering from wind buffeting or rider movement, less prone to head-shake or over-reactions to bumps. It is more resistant to initial turn-in, takes more steering pressure to start the turn. Referring to "stable" IN a corner would usually just mean the bike holds a line (doesn't drift wide or fall in), the term "stable" would not usually mean that it wants to stand up IN the corner. It is possible that front end instability could cause the bike to want to stand up - if the front is overloaded, shaking, or having tiny slide-and-catch motions from the tire, it could make it want to stand up because the varying load on the tire could create a countersteering effect. Or you could be experiencing the front pushing which makes you have to steer it in more to compensate for the bike not quite following the line you want. Before you get too far into suspension or geometry changes, I would take a very close look at tire profile and tire pressures. Is your front tire worn? If you have a lot of highway miles, the tire can become flattened in the center, and not provide a stable shape for cornering. It is called "profiling" when the tire gets worn unevenly and it can DEFINITELY cause the bike to want to stand up in the corner. Or, a tire that is too stiff (because it is cold, for example) can resist leaning over, and a tire that is too soft (low pressure) can flatten out and cause a counter-steering effect, too.
    1 point
  24. In general, lowering the front will make the bike easier to turn into the corner, and cause it to hold a tighter line. It can also make the bike less stable - more steering response can make the bike feel "twitchy" and lowering the front too much can cause the front end to shake or wobble entering a corner. John (above) is correct that the rear shock or ride height can affect this also - is your rear suspension set much stiffer (or higher) than the front? You may also want to take a look at the profile of your tires, and the pressures. A cold race tire can feel (and is) very stiff; when leaned over it resists compressing and tends to try to spring back into shape which makes the bike want to stand up, so the rider has to keep pressure on the inside bar to stay on line. If you are using racing tires with a V profile, or using full race tires or stiff track-day tires but not riding fast/hard enough to warm them up, the tires could be causing the feeling you describe. Possibly having the tire pressure too high could cause a similar problem. Another thing that makes the rider have to maintain pressure on the inside bar to keep the bike on line is trail braking. If you are applying the front brake while the bike is leaned over in a corner, it will tend to make the bike want to stand up, and you would have to press on the inside bar to counteract that. (Watch A Twist of the Wrist II for a great CGI video explaining why this happens.) Another potential cause for having to press on the inside bar is... pressure from your OTHER hand on the outside bar. Make sure you aren't unconsciously pushing on the OUTER bar, forcing yourself to have to counteract that force by pushing on the INSIDE bar. Check your body position to make sure you are not pushing accidentally on the bars, trying to support your body. Riders do this more commonly than you might think.
    1 point
  25. Newbie's guide to surviving the Cornering Forum! WELCOME...You may have just started riding, or may be a veteran with years of experience under your belt. In any case, if you are reading this, chances are, you are a "Newbie" to the Cornering Forum. Here are some pointers to make your stay here more enjoyable, and to bring you up to speed on things around here. Register You can't participate if you don't sign up. Registration is not instant, every registration is verified by a real person to keep the wackos out (at least those that would rather sell you a plastic rubber chicken than ride). There are a ton of spammers that would like to make our board their personal billboard. to prevent that from happening we review all the registrations. It may take a day or two to get approved, if you really want to post now, fill out the registration, and then send an email with the name and email you registered under to DISCUSSIONBOARD at SUPERBIKESCHOOL dot COM or call the office during normal business hours. Otherwise sit tight and you will get approved typically within 24 hours. Introducing yourself If you are just lurking here, STOP IT! Go ahead and say hello to the community in the Newbies section. Go on. No one will bite you. (Unless of course, you are into that kind of thing) Searching the forum Chances are, your questions have already been asked and answered many times before, so do a search on the topic first. Things like which what is the difference between a one day and two day school, if short riders can use a school bike, GP shift patterns, how not to crash (don't ask Mike), which oil to use (silkolene), how to wash the bike (don't ask Will), how to clean the chain (don't ask James), etc., have been discussed many times before. Search for them first using the link found around the top-right of the page. But don't be afraid to ask anything, that is why the forum is here. Post count under a user's name It doesn't mean they are any good at motorcycling, or know what they are talking about. But it does mean that they have been around here long enough to know who is who, know the inside jokes, and are probably willing to help if they racked up that many posts. Treating other members The school's motorcycling world closer than you may realize. You are bound to run into someone sooner or later. You may be stock somewhere in the middle of nowhere and a person you just met yesterday at a school may come to your rescue. Treat everyone on this board like you are going to see them tomorrow standing next to your riding coach. Ongoing jokes - don't get offended until you are sure it is meant to offend you As a new member, you may find things that don't make sense or are not what they seem, there are some ongoing inside jokes that may come as a surprise to an outsider or a new comer. These jokes are part of the forum's fun nature, and nothing more should be read into them. Do not take it personally. Signatures Please use your head...basically, no large signtures, and no quotes from other users in your signature without first checking with them and receiving their permission. Using Private Messaging (PM) and emails Many new users, when setting their Options, choose to hide their email, or choose to set "Enable Private Messaging?" to No. Suggestion: leave the PM option ON, even if you want to hide your email. Also, modify your settings such that when you receive a PM, an email is automatically sent to you (by the system, not the user) to notify you that you have a PM. This is a great option that is a must. To view your PMs, click on the UserCP link on top of the page, then click on Private Messages link. SPAM People here do not like spammers at all. Even though you may feel like you are offering people some amazing deals on goods or services, if it comes across as SPAM, people won't like it, and SPAM posts are usually deleted right away. If you have a business you want to promote, or you have means of providing a service and making money from it, you are best to contact the school to see what it takes to become a school sponsor and promote your business through the school properly. An area that may be of interest to you... Keith's Article Forum: where Keith posts articles between books http://forums.superbikeschool.com/forum/18-articles-by-keith/ Hope this helps.
    1 point
  26. Correct, a new lubricant sponsor.
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. On to something valuable is good, that's the way its been going since I started coaching way the hell back in 1976 🙂
    1 point
  29. I am no expert in any way on this, but I presume it is about awareness (where are you placed) and confidence (rely on your knowledge about where you are). Some are better at knowing where in space they are situated than others. Personally, I am hopeless, which is why I constantly bump into things. So I need some margins, likely more than you, to feel somewhat in control. Here are some pictures for inspiration about using all the available space, and then some, showing what is possible:
    1 point
  30. Lebedo; I wasn't worried about you stealing my stuff, everything in the books and videos is for riders to improve themselves, if you see better ways to instruct from the books and videos and you see it helping your students, I'm happy about that. The bike should not stand up once pressure is released after the counter-steering pressure is applied. If the rider is crossed up as you illustrate in the photo then it WILL have the tendency to stand up. This is possible. Also, riders often restrain the bars with the opposite hand e.g., press the right bar to turn right but their left arm is stiff holding on to the left bar. They could be pushing or pulling on the left bar. If they are pushing on it the bike will stand up. When you instruct counter-steering you always look at both arms. The negative effects on handling from being too tight on the bars is well covered in" A Twist of the Wrist II" Keith
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. There are no go kart tracks around here any more. There is an indoor place but they stopped letting motorcycles ride it awhile ago. (probably that way too much/long winter where they still are paying taxes etc but zero income thing on all those outdoor places that were around in the 70's and 80's and have long since closed) I have rented the local tracks in the past and brought a dozen to a few dozen people with me, and I have attended no less than 30 trackday events including 3 times @ 2 days each with CSS, plus Schwantz school once, Spencers school once, and some other actual school for which I can't even remember who's off hand now. The only local trackday org is a crash fest and if you are lucky you might be able to ride the entire 20 minute session 2 or 3 times in an entire day, it gets red flagged for even the most simple of crashes, and there are lots of crashes. and they really do very little to improve your riding, it is more or less a free for all and the "instructors" cause many of the crashes too, I have seen them zip by too close and hook a footpeg on the being passed riders bike, clothing, or foot etc and put them on the ground- the whole thing screams of what I expect from "instructors" who aren't paid and get a form 1099 at the end of the year for the retail cost of what the trackday org charges, so they are actually paying to "instruct" which is probably why they just ride as much and as fast as they can trying to get their monies worth or some such nonsense. (I am sure some of the "instructors" are there for the right reasons but definitely not the majority) I think all of them are racers who think since they ride and touch racing it is okay to pass close and touch at the trackday- don't really know other than it is not what I want if I want to attend a trackday, and I hear the same from dozens of people who tried it once and never went again and some who still attend because it is the only game in town but complain about it all the time. besides, in my racing days there were more than too many times deer were on the track or turtles or other wildlife, I even saw people hit the deer and the turtles, so while, sure track riding should be far safer with one way traffic and corner workers alerting you to dangers, they are far from safe. I have seen more crashed bikes and serious injuries from trackday riders than I have from street riders. Even the local 1.1 mile track at the community college has deer routinely inside the fence in close proximity to the track, but atleast medical is close and you have lots of other people around for help. I will never give up riding the street, I will still be riding until the day I can longer ride. I find street riding far more enjoyable than track riding for 20 minutes, sit around and wait 40+ minutes, then maybe get 20 minutes again, then sit around and wait, then more waiting for that hour lunch and then a couple afternoon sessions which nearly always get shortened duue to crashes. For the $100 spent, to if lucky, get 60 miles in at the local track in an all day event or the $200+ and travel and hotel expenses and possibly get 150 miles in an entire day event at actual racetracks... I can depart from home in the am and ride all day 400-500 miles and eat out all three meals and still spend less than $100 and have way more fun and create much better memories and experience, sans the times hitting deer...., and I would never replace all the trips to the Rockies, or Appalachians and even in Hill Country and everything they have brought me. While I liked racing for what it was ( I loved to win, or atleast be top 5 and compete close- plus I had 3 bikes to ride so I was in nearly every race, everyday the 5 or 6 weekends I could race), I never really enjoyed trackdays as you simply sit around and wait far too much and spend alot of monies for so little riding time........... Yes I know CSS (and other actual schools) has classroom time, instructor talk time, actual on track time and the off track drills and one is always moving, it was almost too busy my last time at VIR, but I would still rather do CSS than any other trackday or riding school even if it ends up costing me way more given the distance I have to travel to any of the offered tracks plus the associated expenses.... But I still prefer street riding and enjoy it so much more. I just don't enjoy it as much as I once did given the deer hit in 2015 and now this one in 2020 both put me in the hospital when no other deer hit even put a scratch on me and all but one of those I rode the bike home still- one of them broke the radiator so I had to go back and pick it up with the trailer. I may never enjoy it as much as I once did, but I hope I can enjoy it more than I did the past year or two As far as my bike choice, I have owned atleast 50 different bikes and I ride them all about the same, so it isn't the bike that would make me safer or enjoy it more. I can run through the local 9 mile twisty road on a VN1600 at the same pace I would run the same road on a ZX6R, I simply don't go ride to blast and get some adrenaline rush like too many do, but I also am not sightseeing and stopping to take pictures etc, I get on the bike and want to ride, that is all I want to do, ride and ride some more and keep riding until I have to head back to home As to the deer, yes there are far too many. I wish more hunters would go out in the fall but people don't hunt like they did 30 and 40 years ago when almost everyone hunted here.
    1 point
  33. Hi all, Well life has done what it does and kept me off motorcycles for the last 2 years... before that I'd only done track riding for 3-4 years and had done up to Level 3, made some really good progress and found myself in the fastest group at track days. I did a double track day in early September at basically a new track (I'd ridden it once 5-6 years ago), honestly didn't think it would take me that long to get back up to speed but I wasn't doing as well as I'd hoped and probably had unrealistic expectations of being able to just get back into it. Add into the mix that I've put race glass on the bike, that was a fair bit to get used to especially as the higher seat completely changing my body position. I was up higher over the front end, less space to "tuck in", it was more like folding myself on top of the bike, I was pushing down on the bars rather than forwards/horizontal. At the end of the first day I lay in bed to have a rest and my front delts were just stinging, so I knew I was doing something wrong! Anyway I was just wondering what others have done to adjust to bike changes like that? And how have you managed to get back up to speed after some time off the bike? It feels like I almost need to start from the beginning and do the school drills one lap at a time as a bit of a refresher. Also with the higher seat - that means I will need to use more lean angle for a given corner & speed, correct? I guess that will come when I'm completely comfortable and confident on the bike again. Last month was my first time on actual race slicks as well - wow they have some grip, I didn't even get close to their limits. I will be doing another track day on Monday at my local track that I spend probably 70% of my time at so I know it much better, hopefully a familiar track will help me get back up to speed easier. I just realised that I had so much going on last month that not once did I take a moment to "flap my elbows" to help stay loose. I was not in the best shape either, put on a few kilos during Covid lockdown. Plus brand new leathers that were fairly stiff and felt like they were limiting my movement. I should probably just write off the next couple of track days as "training days", take it easy and stay in a lower group? Cheers, Conrad
    1 point
  34. I had a similar thing happen to me to a lesser extent in 2017/2018. Here are my suggestions, they mostly link together: Take your time. As much as you 'know' you can go faster, don't let ego come into play. It can be a breakthrough process. I was making small improvements through 2018 and then, towards the end of the year, suddenly started dropping seconds per session as the old habits reasserted themselves. Have a plan and work on one thing at a time, just like CSS lessons. In fact, if you still have your little notebooks from CSS you could even try explicitly repeating the drills at a track day. One last question: why do you think a higher seat would require more lean angle all other things being equal?
    1 point
  35. This is actually a tough question to answer because it can depend on a LOT of variables (pressures, temps, suspension settings, tire fit to bike, riding style, etc.) and that is probably why you haven't seen much response. It does look like cold tear and it's interesting that it seems to be happening near where the tire changes from one compound (harder) to another (softer). Do you accelerate hard, in short bursts, with minimal lean angle? What is the tire size you are running, is it the same size as the OEM, or have you put on a wider tire? I agree with Yakaru that you should probably start with lower pressure in that rear tire, it does sound too high, and next I would pay attention to your throttle control - when do you begin your roll on and do you roll on smoothly and gradually or quickly and hard? My first guess (aside from the pressure being too high) is your throttle application may be a bit too late and too abrupt, a "point and shoot" type of riding, which means nearly all of the acceleration occurs somewhat suddenly as the bike is mostly upright, putting a lot of load on the area where you see the tearing, but not giving the tire much time to warm up with gentler acceleration at steeper lean angles. It might be a good idea to review the Throttle Control info in Twist II or on the Twist II DVD, then experiment with your throttle control in corners and see if that reduces the tearing.
    1 point
  36. Hi Merritt C You'll love your time on track with the superbike school! I disagree that the Two-day camp is too intense for first-timers. I attended a two-day camp with just 10 months of riding experience and loved it. The coaches will look after you on-track, as will course control and the instructors in the classroom too. They are a great team who want the best for your time there. Personally, I found the two-day camp really lets you soak up all the information like a sponge then practice at your leisure in your own riding time. You also have two days with the same coach to improve your riding at your pace, as opposed to going flat out on one day and burning out! The 2:1 student:coach ratio is fantastic as you get a lot of track time with them which was the selling point for me and worth the extra cash! I also agree with yakura that you can get more from being in a dedicated learning environment for those two days so there is less time spent travelling to and from track on different days, but, as she points out it depends on your learning style and schedule. The kit they use is great, boots, back protectors, etc. I haven't ridden the 2020 BMW RR but the previous versions were amazingly user-friendly. I was picturing ending up in A&E having never ridden a sportsbike or been on track before, but they were actually easier to ride than my own. I have done one-day schools also and they are great, but after having done a camp it is very obvious there are fewer track sessions, less time with the coach on track and there are more bodies on track. The only issue I had with the camp was at the end of the very last session of the last day I was gassed! You sound like a fit lady (fitter than I was!) so I doubt you would have any dramas there - I would say turn up rested, hydrated and go for it!
    1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. Been away for a looooong time but this thread caught my attention. I have done 2up rides and if you get the right rider who's mission is to teach rather than to scare it's an amazing experience. I found myself at the side of Roebling Road Raceway with such a rider and hopped on. After the ride and the scare (it's unavoidable) it had massive affects on my confidence on the bike. After the experience I wrote an article that appeared in BMW OTL Magazine about it. It's somewhere on the forum here but buried under years of other posts. The most important aspects of riding 2up is not only hold on tight but to retain a mental space where you can actually absorb the experience while not getting in the way of the rider. It's well worth the scare IMHO.
    1 point
  39. When you were trail braking could your brake release have been a little too quick or your rebound too soft? When the brake is released abruptly the forks will extend, making the bike suddenly run wide, which would change your line AND force you to have to delay the throttle until the bike came back around to your desired line. It can be really hard, when trail braking, to get the brake release slow and gradual enough to avoid that. Additionally, it is much harder to precisely judge entry speed when braking late/trail braking versus setting the entry speed earlier and using less (or no) brakes. That's the purpose of the no-brakes drill we do, to fine-tune entry speed. Is it possible that before, your entry speed was just a tad too high, so you were running slightly wide and having to wait too long to get on the throttle? (That is a very common problem!)
    1 point
  40. I am sorry to hear about your crash. I'm not sure what to say in response to your post; I am coach with a school and our absolute #1 priority is to keep riders from crashing. I know that in the classroom there is quite a bit of explanation about how to do the no-brakes drill. Riders are told that this is a drill and not a rule - riders may of course use the brakes if needed for safety, the brakes are not disabled and the only consequence of using the brakes during the drill is possibly a corner worker showing a blue flag to remind that rider about the drill. The point of the exercise is to focus on setting entry speed properly without relying on the brakes, which slow the bike down rapidly and make it harder to judge an exact speed. Riders are instructed that one must allow extra room for the bike to slow down and that it is OK to use the brakes if needed. Additionally riders are asked to ride at a reduced pace, one that is very comfortable for them, for sure not higher than about 75% of what they would consider their normal riding pace, in order to have enough free attention to focus on the drill. As far as required experience level, this is what is stated on the website: 2000 miles of riding experience is required, along with being comfortable enough to operate the motorcycle and still have enough free attention to take in new information. I believe that info is also restated in the paperwork sent to any student who signs up. For sure we get students who do not understand counter-steering, even some who ride very well and have ridden for 30 years; everyone who rides a two-wheel motorcycle countersteers, but not everyone really understands how it works. Again, I am sorry to hear of your crash; I see that Cobie (who is the Chief Riding Coach Worldwide for the school) has offered to speak with you on the phone if you would like to talk through what happened with him, that is a nice offer and could be quite helpful to you in your riding (he can help diagnose exactly what factors led up to the crash); as you might imagine he has an enormous knowledge base and exceptional riding and coaching experience, and of course he will be very interested in hearing what happened especially if there was something more that could have been done to prevent it.
    1 point
  41. Basically, no, it is not ok to just add more braking if you are "too hot" into a turn and leaned way over, it would be a very dicey and delicate operation with a high likelihood of losing the front, it is VERY easy to blow past the traction limit or run out of ground clearance (hitting hard parts on the bike) doing that. Brakes should be tapering off as lean angle is increased, not the other way around. Yes, you will have to give up your line; if you are fully leaned into the corner and realize your entry speed was too high, it's too late to salvage your line. You will need to either let the bike run wide (if the entry speed error is small) or if it is way too high you will have to stand the bike up, brake hard, and slow it down as much as possible, then steer it again (at a new reduced speed requiring less lean and hopefully make the turn) or run off (after having slowed down as much as possible first). If you are getting into turns and not realizing your are too fast until you are already leaned over, it sounds like you might be riding over your head. A review of A Twist of the Wrist II book or movie to discover how to choose a turn point, how to set entry speed, and visual skills (when exactly to look into the corner and WHERE exactly to look) would help a great deal. If you are relying on trail braking to correct too-high entry speed errors, you are approaching things backwards - a better strategy would be to do some no-brakes practice to get your entry speed under control FIRST, then add trail braking (to allow for a later braking zone) once the other skills are in place. Using the brakes while leaned over is a skill that requires a very good foundation of skills - knowing how to choose a line, where to look and when, and a good ability to judge entry speed. Without those foundations, trying to use heavy trail braking to adjust entry speed while already near max lean is a tricky business.
    1 point
  42. On the street my absolute number one priority is safety. On the street I’m constantly trying to remain conscious of the variables outside of my control: most notably these include road conditions (loose gravel or a boulder in the middle of a blind turn), wildlife, oncoming traffic crossing over the double yellow, and the unimaginable/unexpected (like a Porsche making a 3-point U-turn in the middle of a blind corner on Mulholland, yes it happens). The most valuable tool I’ve learned from CSS for increased safety on the street is Wide Vision - without practicing wide vision it’s impossible to look through a corner and reserve attention/awareness for the unexpected. Wide vision and riding at 70-80% of my ability on the street has served me well. That way, hopefully, I become aware of the unexpected ASAP and I’ve got an extra $2-3 in savings to spend on it.
    1 point
  43. This is difficult as to a point these skills will play off each other. So, my opinion (based on street riding, not track though they are likely the same): #1 - Visual skill, lack of target fixation. You have to see the situation or threat before anything else can happen. #2 - Quick reflexes. Once you see the threat/issue you need to make the right reaction. #3 - Ability to steer quickly. If you need to change direction, this is important. #4 - Physical Condition. Its important so you can enjoy your ride and not be fatigued (and sloppy) #5 - A lowly last is Brave. Just being brave will likely get you in real trouble. One skill not mentioned is ability to brake safely and quickly in all riding attitudes (straight up, turning, poor traction etc).
    1 point
  44. Think of holding up a barbell with only one hand in the middle of the bar. If you put 10 lbs at either end, you get a total force of 20 lbs pushing down on your wrist. If you put 20 lbs on ONE end and none on the other end, you still have 20 lbs pushing down on your wrist, but now the bar will exert a twisting motion on your wrist because one side is weighted more than the other. That's why I think weighting the inside peg more could produce a "roll" torque - the twisting force you'd feel in your wrist.
    1 point
  45. I don't know about Cobie, but that is the only circumstance where I do clutcless downshifts on a roadrace bike, Turn 8 at Willow Springs is 6th gear pinned and I drop two gears for turn 9 without the clutch. At a good pace your leaned over quite far when you do the downshifts. Worked pretty well when I set a lap record.
    1 point
  46. Jason Pridmore is big into using the clutch to modulate rear traction...attention drain IMHO. Clutchless upshifts (or down if you use GP) works very well when in full-boogie mode. I could see a miniscule advantage for going 5th gear to 2nd, but again I've learned to blip/change w/o thinking about it. Like the above was said it's a very small Return on Investment for something that may have high risk (?).
    1 point
  47. Another myth perpetuated by the internet and simply untrue.
    1 point
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