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  1. This thread started me thinking. Dangerous, I know. Some riders, very good ones, claim they just know where the tires are and can hit a tight apex. I can't but I'm happy for them. Knee to curb is workable, or, more descriptively, Knee Over Curb. 9 out of 10 students reap substantial improvements with that drill. AS Hofoot said, she can't see the tank on her small bike and if body position is good, with head low and turned in to the corner, it may be similar on a big bike. The more "GP" the body position the less tank you'll see. One other thing just struck me as a possible device for estimating the location of the tires in a corner. It's the position of your outside foot. Look at Yakaru's shot at Streets, or any shot in the thread, the outside foot is very close to being perfectly over the rear contact patch, not quite directly over it but that would give you a safety margin if it was a help. I say "if it was a help" because I have no idea if this would work for anyone. You could call it a research project at this point and I hope to try it out for myself as well. Keith
    4 points
  2. One drill we commonly use in Level 4 is "knee over curb". The idea is to find a point of reference other than your head/eyes to use, to judge distance to the inside edge of the corner. If you approach the corner with the idea that you are going to try to put your knee over the curb instead of positioning your head over it, you can see (looking at your photo) that your tires would be at least a foot closer to the inside, probably more. Another advantage of using your knee as your reference is that most riders can SEE their knee in their peripheral vision, which helps to judge position over the curb. Having said that, I personally am pretty short so my knee doesn't stick out very far (so it is harder to see) and my knee position is not super consistent because on my small, lightweight low HP racebike I sometimes keep my knee tucked in for faster corners to reduce wind drag and/or lock on more solidly. So, per a suggestion from my Level 4 consultant, I started using the gas tank as my reference. I try to put the gas tank over the curb. It helps mainly because I can know with CERTAINTY that when I am leaned over, I can safely get the tank over the curb without worrying about hitting it (or the dirt, or ragged edge of track) that I DON'T want to hit at full lean. It gets me a lot closer without having any attention on worrying about hitting the curb. Since your height is, I think, similar to mine and I know you sometimes ride a lightweight bike, using the tank might be something to try.
    3 points
  3. I haven't watched the video but I HAVE experienced noticeable changes in handling as a result of changing tires (brand or size), and after a few of those experiences I now pick a brand and size of tire and set up the bike for THOSE tires and stay with them. If I need to change to a different brand or size of tires, I am prepared to start all over on suspension settings and bike setup. Changing to a different model or size of tires can change how the suspension feels - is the tire stiffer than the prior one? Does it have a different profile shape that affects the turn in and steering characteristics? Does it support you differently under hard braking, or during trail braking? - and different tires (even ones that are supposed to be the same nominal size) can have differing widths which can affect the fit of tire to rim or whether the tire will rub the chain or different heights which can change the attitude of the bike. If you changed your front tire and the new one had a little less height than the prior one, it would effectively lower your front end which can affect handling, making the bike steer in more easily but feel less stable. Or if the new tire is taller it could make the bike feel more sluggish to steer but more stable in a straight line. Different stiffness/softness of the carcass changes the steering and suspension feel and the tire's profile changes the feel in the corners, too. At a minimum, if I changed tire models or sizes, I would measure the ride height before and after the tire change and adjust the forks or rear shock to get the bike back to the ride height and attitude that it had prior to the change. I'd also research the design info on the new tires - are they race oriented? Stiffer than the prior model? Is the profile more V shaped than the prior model? - so I have an idea of what might change in the handling and have a plan for how to adjust the bike settings to suit.
    2 points
  4. Ready to ride? I just found out there are a few spots still available for the March 18-19 2 Day Camp at Streets of Willow. It's a rare opportunity to jump in last-minute, schools normally sell out far in advance. I'll be there, I can hardly wait! Sign up, come on out, tell your friends.
    2 points
  5. Worth bumping up, for all to read again. Enjoy!
    2 points
  6. I joined the forum a few days back but forgot to introduce myself. I'm Chad James and I live in New York now. I'm passionate about automobiles and own a KTM 790 Adventure R, which I take to places on weekends.
    2 points
  7. "An accurate orientation in space begins with two external Reference Points. We find two points or objects or areas first and this then gives us a reckoning of our own location where we become the third point of orientation. Together, that creates an accurate tracking of the direction of our progress in relation to the other two. With those three, our eyes begin to create 3D space, which in turn improves our perception of relative speed and direction of travel. Also, and importantly, our sense of time and timing switches on quite automatically. In short, RPs help us create perspective." - Keith, in his article Time, Space and Speed "As I have seen with lots of top riders, their biggest ongoing breakthroughs come in their ability to use their visual abilities, their perception of location." - Keith, in You and Valentino Rossi The more I learn about riding and the more time I spend on track (not nearly enough), the more I realize how fundamentally important it is to have good visual skills and a good sense of speed. I like this video clip because it illustrates that where you look has a big effect on your sense of speed and space. I very much look forward to running some more visual drills with CSS in 2021.
    2 points
  8. Sometimes, it is best to hurry slowly in order to reach the destination the quickest. Take care of your body and let it heal at its own rate, pushing it towards, but never beyond the limits it sets 😉 Hope you get back to full health!
    2 points
  9. I liked the sound of this too so thought I would try it out before writing. I like the idea of using the outside peg to 'triangulate' a point of the tyres' contact patches to the peg, to create a better idea of where the bike is placed, pretty much as El Colibri found. Also, that our awareness of using that outside peg should already be 'switched on' if we are pivot steering (which I assume we are). As it's new to me, I did find my attention was then slightly focussed at the rear of the bike, which then felt like it was playing catchup as the bike moves forward - perhaps this is just how my faulty cerebrum is wired! But will keep at it... I have used the 'tank over curb' before on the track, but found it takes up too much attention on the street. Admittedly, I am 5'11" on a small 300 so I do need to glance down to see the tank.
    2 points
  10. apparently the Suzuki Boys will take the cake home. Happy for them.
    2 points
  11. The best pressure setting can vary by bike/rider weight, by track, and by temperature and is not always the easiest thing to figure out. Best thing to do (assuming you are talking about track riding) is to ask the Pirelli race tire distributor, and be specific about what bike you have, what pace you ride (A, B or C group at local trackdays, for example, or tell them your typical laptimes), and whether it is expected to be cold or hot out. The Pirelli range given above is a good starting point; if you see any abnormal tire wear (tearing, or uneven wear) occurring, you can ask a tire provider or suspension person for guidance, or if you want to look into it yourself, Google Dave Moss, he has lots of videos about tire wear and suspension that can help you "read" the tire to try to figure out what is happening. If none of that is available, as a rough guide try starting out around 30-31 psi cold (which should go up to around 33-34 hot) on the front, and if the ride feels harsh or the tire doesn't seem to grip as well as you'd like (especially over rough pavement), try 1-2 PSI lower and see if that helps. If the front feels mushy and sluggish to steer, try going a few psi higher.
    2 points
  12. Lots of good data from some of you and especially Hotfoot’s info. Here’s just a bit more on the subject of Pivot Steering. May be repetitive of some data already written but look it over an do the experiment at the end for fun. My statement in Twist II about getting your weight closer to the center of mass or center of gravity by weighting the pegs rather than the seat and any implication that it alters the center of mass (COM) or center of gravity (COG) was, or helps in any way is, for lack of a better words, junk, incorrect, wrong. Weight in the seat or on the pegs does not change the COG of you or the bike, at all. If you could move your body's mass lower than the seat or tank, it would but it has to be the mass changing position, not where the mass is connected to the bike. Putting more weight on one or another peg is only changing its connection point. If you weight one peg you will go lighter in the seat and un-weight the other peg some. A very slight weight imbalance may occur but it has little, or no, effect on the bike’s direction. When a bad passenger leans the “wrong” way, the rider must compensate by leaning the bike over more to stay on line. The COG of the passenger becomes offset from the bike’s COG and it must be leaned more to balance out the offset-from-center COG. The same goes for riders who hang their bum way off but leave their torsos crossed up, on the other side of the bikes center line. The benefit of the bum off the one side is neutralized by the torso mass being crossed to the other side or staying in the middle. In a straight line, moving your body’s mass over to the side, as in preparing the hung off riding position, creates a weight and COG imbalance. The bike veers toward the hung off side’s direction, slightly, not enough to turn into any corner on a race track at speed but does work on the road in some sweeping corners–at road speeds. Pivot steering, as many have pointed out, has nothing to do with the weight on the outside peg. The peg is used as a push–off/pivot point. The weight on it has no measurable effect on the bikes balance. The thigh/knee are driven up and into the tank from the peg by doing a ‘calf raise’, pivoting off the peg. For pressing, or for pull-plus-press steering, there is no more stable or stronger body position than the Pivot Steering technique. This is easily demonstrated. Have a friend hold a small bathroom scale flat up against the wall. Stand in front of it and line up your right arm with the scale. Plant both feet solidly about footpeg width, about 2 feet from the wall. Press on the scale with your right palm as hard as you can. Get the reading. With feet in the same position, shift all your weight onto the right foot and then press as hard as you can on the scale with the right hand again. Get the reading. Finally, pivot all your weight from your left foot and press on the scale. The last will be the highest reading by a substantial margin. That is one of the benefits of Pivot Steering, maximum strength which also tells you it is the most stable body position possible for counter steering. The weighting of pegs in off road conditions was mentioned for traversing across slanted ground. In that scenario, the rider’s body mass also changes position in order to weight the peg and that shifts the combined COG to their benefit.
    2 points
  13. I don't claim to know this for a fact, but my first thought is this: countersteering takes the front wheel out of line with the direction of travel, creating the lean, and that creates resistance and some temporary deformation of the tire, and that if you try to push the bar quickly (but without increasing the force) the tire just sort of bounces back at you and you get a wobble instead of a real direction change, whereas a STRONGER push really turns the bars and creates a larger force at the contact patch to lean the bike over rapidly. That's my thought, but I'll try to get a more technical answer for you from the boss. The main thing we are trying to avoid is riders trying to "punch" at the bar, because that creates instability and a wobble in the steering. That is easy to test, go out and ride and try a very light (low force), controlled push on the bar and see how the bike steers. Then try a much firmer push with similar control (harder but not faster). Then try a very quick, low force stab at the bar (faster but nor harder) and see what happens. Which gives you a faster and more controlled steering result? When you try this, make sure you are going at a decent speed, over 25 mph, so that you don't accidentally oversteer and lean too far - it takes a lot less force to lean the bike over a very slow speeds so that makes the whole exercise of playing around with the steering more difficult.
    1 point
  14. Thanks for the input. I decided to do the camp before I'd seen this. I decided that if it requires more, then so be it.
    1 point
  15. The REAL meaning of the Haynes instructions Haynes: Rotate anticlockwise. Translation: Clamp with molegrips then beat repeatedly with hammer anticlockwise. You do know which way is anticlockwise, don't you? Haynes: Should remove easily. Translation: Will be corroded into place ... clamp with adjustable spanner then beat repeatedly with a hammer. Haynes: This is a snug fit. Translation: You will skin your knuckles! ... Clamp with adjustable spanner then beat repeatedly with hammer. Haynes: This is a tight fit. Translation: Not a hope in hell matey! ... Clamp with adjustable spanner then beat repeatedly with hammer. Haynes: As described in Chapter 7... Translation: That'll teach you not to read through before you start, now you are looking at scary photos of the inside of a gearbox. Haynes: Pry... Translation: Hammer a screwdriver into... Haynes: Undo... Translation: Go buy a tin of WD40 (industrial size). Haynes: Ease ... Translation: Apply superhuman strength to ... Haynes: Retain tiny spring... Translation: "Crikey what was that, it nearly had my eye out"! Haynes: Press and rotate to remove bulb... Translation: OK - that's the glass bit off, now fetch some good pliers to dig out the bayonet part and remaining glass shards. Haynes: Lightly... Translation: Start off lightly and build up till the veins on your forehead are throbbing then re-check the manual because what you are doing now cannot be considered "lightly". Haynes: Weekly checks... Translation: If it isn't broken don't fix it! Haynes: Routine maintenance... Translation: If it isn't broken... it's about to be! Haynes: One spanner rating (simple). Translation: Your Mum could do this... so how did you manage to botch it up? Haynes: Two spanner rating. Translation: Now you may think that you can do this because two is a low, tiny, ikkle number... but you also thought that the wiring diagram was a map of the Tokyo underground (in fact that would have been more use to you). Haynes: Three spanner rating (intermediate). Translation: Make sure you won't need your car for a couple of days and that your AA cover includes Home Start. Haynes: Four spanner rating. Translation: You are seriously considering this aren't you, you pleb! Haynes: Five spanner rating (expert). Translation: OK - but don't expect us to ride it afterwards!!! Translation #2: Don't ever carry your loved ones in it again and don't mention it to your insurance company. Haynes: If not, you can fabricate your own special tool like this... Translation: Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!! Haynes: Compress... Translation: Squeeze with all your might, jump up and down on, swear at, throw at the garage wall, then search for it in the dark corner of the garage whilst muttering "******" repeatedly under your breath. Haynes: Inspect... Translation: Squint at really hard and pretend you know what you are looking at, then declare in a loud knowing voice to your wife "Yep, as I thought, it's going to need a new one"! Haynes: Carefully... Translation: You are about to cut yourself! Haynes: Retaining nut... Translation: Yes, that's it, that big spherical blob of rust. Haynes: Get an assistant... Translation: Prepare to humiliate yourself in front of someone you know. Haynes: Refitting is the reverse sequence to removal. Translation: But you swear in different places. Haynes: Prise away plastic locating pegs... Translation: Snap off... Haynes: Using a suitable drift or pin-punch... Translation: The biggest nail in your tool box isn't a suitable drift! Haynes: Everyday toolkit Translation: Ensure you have an RAC Card & Mobile Phone Haynes: Apply moderate heat... Translation: Placing your mouth near it and huffing isn't moderate heat. Translation #2: Heat up until glowing red, if it still doesn't come undone use a hacksaw. Haynes: Apply moderate heat... Translation: Unless you have a blast furnace, don't bother. Clamp with adjustable spanner then beat repeatedly with hammer. Haynes: Index Translation: List of all the things in the book bar the thing you want to do! Haynes: Remove oil filter using an oil filter chain spanner or length of bicycle chain. Translation: Stick a screwdriver through it and beat handle repeatedly with a hammer. Haynes: Replace old gasket with a new one. Translation: I know I've got a tube of Krazy Glue around here somewhere. Haynes: Grease well before refitting. Translation: Spend an hour searching for your tub of grease before chancing upon a bottle of washing-up liquid. Wipe some congealed washing up liquid from the dispenser nozzle and use that since it's got a similar texture and will probably get you to Halfords to buy some Castrol grease. Haynes: See illustration for details Translation: None of the illustrations notes will match the pictured exploded, numbered parts. The unit illustrated is from a previous or variant model. HAYNES GUIDE TO TOOLS OF THE TRADE HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer is nowadays used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit. ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning steel Pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age, but it also works great for drilling mounting holes just above the brake line that goes to the rear wheel. PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes. MOLE-GRIPS/ADJUSTABLE spanner: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand. OXYACETELENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your garage on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside a brake-drum you're trying to get the bearing race out of. WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for for the last 15 minutes. DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying. WIRE WHEEL: Cleans rust off old bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls in about the time it takes you to say, "F...." HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering car to the ground after you have installed your new front disk brake setup, trapping the jack handle firmly under the front wing. EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2X4: Used for levering a car upward off a hydraulic jack. TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters. PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack. SNAP-ON GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for getting dog-doo off your boot. BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit. TIMING LIGHT: A stroboscopic instrument for illuminating grease buildup. TWO-TON HYDRAULIC ENGINE HOIST: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of ground straps and brake lines you may have forgotten to disconnect. CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A large motor mount prying tool that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end without the handle. AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw. INSPECTION LIGHT: The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate as 105-mm howitzer shells during the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading. PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper- and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads. AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a fossil-fuel burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a pneumatic impact spanner that grips rusty bolts last tightened 30 years ago by someone in Dagenham, and rounds them off. PRY (CROW) BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 pence part. HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses 1/2 inch too short. Engineering Terms * A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT APPROACHES ARE BEING TRIED We are still pissing in the wind. * EXTENSIVE REPORT IS BEING PREPARED ON A FRESH APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM We just hired three kids fresh out of college. * CLOSE PROJECT COORDINATION We know who to blame. * MAJOR TECHNOLOGICAL BREAKTHROUGH It works OK, but looks very hitech. * CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS DELIVERED ASSURED We are so far behind schedule the customer is happy to get it delivered. * PRELIMINARY OPERATIONAL TESTS WERE INCONCLUSIVE The darn thing blew up when we threw the switch * TEST RESULTS WERE EXTREMELY GRATIFYING We are so surprised that the stupid thing works. * THE ENTIRE CONCEPT WILL HAVE TO BE ABANDONED The only person who understood the thing quit. * ALL NEW Parts not interchangeable with the previous design. * RUGGED Too damn heavy to lift! * LIGHTWEIGHT Lighter than RUGGED. * YEARS OF DEVELOPMENT One finally worked. * LOW MAINTENANCE Impossible to fix if broken
    1 point
  16. Hello forum members, We have received a number of reports of a user sending some individual private messages that are spam. The user has been marked as a spammer and banned, and the content has been removed. Thank you to those of you that reported the junk messages. If you received a message notification but cannot view the message, it is because it was junk content was removed. User reports helped us to identify the problem and rectify it very quickly so thank you for your assistance in protecting our forum
    1 point
  17. Looking forward to the Two-Day Camp (Level-4) at VIR, May 5-6, 2021
    1 point
  18. Is it better to learn on your own bike on the track, or is it better to mix it up and learn on a different bike like the s1000rr? I’m currently riding a Triumph Bonneville with some performance and suspension upgrades here and there. I love this bike and currently do not have any plans to pursue a street bike. And my goal for the course is to be a better street rider on the twisties. Should I be concerned about transferring what I learn from a type of bike I probably won’t ride except for this course? Of course, I can bring the Bonnie for the 1-Day course but I’m worried I’ll show up with an inappropriate bike for the track. Any thoughts?
    1 point
  19. Your Bonneville will, obviously, feel more upright than the BMW RR but in your first session (assuming this is your first time at the school) the first couple of laps are slow-speed, follow-the-leader 'sighting laps' which allow one time to adjust to riding position anyway. The first session is usually spent getting used to the track and lines, getting used to the bike, and still early in the day so tyre and track temperatures can still be cool - point being it's not worth going flat out immediately. The coaches really know their stuff and are fantastic at looking after you so you will get a lot out of it whichever bike you ride.
    1 point
  20. For the camp obviously there is the school provided bike. I’ve got my s1000rr and hp4 both already there; and as much as I’d love to bring one of my small bikes I need the trailer space free to bring those back home after. Cobie recommended the s1000 for the tryout.
    1 point
  21. See you there! What are you going to ride?
    1 point
  22. In general, lowering the front will make the bike easier to turn into the corner, and cause it to hold a tighter line. It can also make the bike less stable - more steering response can make the bike feel "twitchy" and lowering the front too much can cause the front end to shake or wobble entering a corner. John (above) is correct that the rear shock or ride height can affect this also - is your rear suspension set much stiffer (or higher) than the front? You may also want to take a look at the profile of your tires, and the pressures. A cold race tire can feel (and is) very stiff; when leaned over it resists compressing and tends to try to spring back into shape which makes the bike want to stand up, so the rider has to keep pressure on the inside bar to stay on line. If you are using racing tires with a V profile, or using full race tires or stiff track-day tires but not riding fast/hard enough to warm them up, the tires could be causing the feeling you describe. Possibly having the tire pressure too high could cause a similar problem. Another thing that makes the rider have to maintain pressure on the inside bar to keep the bike on line is trail braking. If you are applying the front brake while the bike is leaned over in a corner, it will tend to make the bike want to stand up, and you would have to press on the inside bar to counteract that. (Watch A Twist of the Wrist II for a great CGI video explaining why this happens.) Another potential cause for having to press on the inside bar is... pressure from your OTHER hand on the outside bar. Make sure you aren't unconsciously pushing on the OUTER bar, forcing yourself to have to counteract that force by pushing on the INSIDE bar. Check your body position to make sure you are not pushing accidentally on the bars, trying to support your body. Riders do this more commonly than you might think.
    1 point
  23. As a sort of 'add on' to this topic: back in '19 I was at Barber and was hitting a pretty solid pace and hit the point where for some of the faster sections I found I benefited from both pushing and pulling simultaneously to get a strong enough input in to overcome momentum and get the bike on lean/line without being too abrupt about it; in addition to weighting my outside peg which of course also can help.
    1 point
  24. Newbie's guide to surviving the Cornering Forum! WELCOME...You may have just started riding, or may be a veteran with years of experience under your belt. In any case, if you are reading this, chances are, you are a "Newbie" to the Cornering Forum. Here are some pointers to make your stay here more enjoyable, and to bring you up to speed on things around here. Register You can't participate if you don't sign up. Registration is not instant, every registration is verified by a real person to keep the wackos out (at least those that would rather sell you a plastic rubber chicken than ride). There are a ton of spammers that would like to make our board their personal billboard. to prevent that from happening we review all the registrations. It may take a day or two to get approved, if you really want to post now, fill out the registration, and then send an email with the name and email you registered under to DISCUSSIONBOARD at SUPERBIKESCHOOL dot COM or call the office during normal business hours. Otherwise sit tight and you will get approved typically within 24 hours. Introducing yourself If you are just lurking here, STOP IT! Go ahead and say hello to the community in the Newbies section. Go on. No one will bite you. (Unless of course, you are into that kind of thing) Searching the forum Chances are, your questions have already been asked and answered many times before, so do a search on the topic first. Things like which what is the difference between a one day and two day school, if short riders can use a school bike, GP shift patterns, how not to crash (don't ask Mike), which oil to use (silkolene), how to wash the bike (don't ask Will), how to clean the chain (don't ask James), etc., have been discussed many times before. Search for them first using the link found around the top-right of the page. But don't be afraid to ask anything, that is why the forum is here. Post count under a user's name It doesn't mean they are any good at motorcycling, or know what they are talking about. But it does mean that they have been around here long enough to know who is who, know the inside jokes, and are probably willing to help if they racked up that many posts. Treating other members The school's motorcycling world closer than you may realize. You are bound to run into someone sooner or later. You may be stock somewhere in the middle of nowhere and a person you just met yesterday at a school may come to your rescue. Treat everyone on this board like you are going to see them tomorrow standing next to your riding coach. Ongoing jokes - don't get offended until you are sure it is meant to offend you As a new member, you may find things that don't make sense or are not what they seem, there are some ongoing inside jokes that may come as a surprise to an outsider or a new comer. These jokes are part of the forum's fun nature, and nothing more should be read into them. Do not take it personally. Signatures Please use your head...basically, no large signtures, and no quotes from other users in your signature without first checking with them and receiving their permission. Using Private Messaging (PM) and emails Many new users, when setting their Options, choose to hide their email, or choose to set "Enable Private Messaging?" to No. Suggestion: leave the PM option ON, even if you want to hide your email. Also, modify your settings such that when you receive a PM, an email is automatically sent to you (by the system, not the user) to notify you that you have a PM. This is a great option that is a must. To view your PMs, click on the UserCP link on top of the page, then click on Private Messages link. SPAM People here do not like spammers at all. Even though you may feel like you are offering people some amazing deals on goods or services, if it comes across as SPAM, people won't like it, and SPAM posts are usually deleted right away. If you have a business you want to promote, or you have means of providing a service and making money from it, you are best to contact the school to see what it takes to become a school sponsor and promote your business through the school properly. An area that may be of interest to you... Keith's Article Forum: where Keith posts articles between books http://forums.superbikeschool.com/forum/18-articles-by-keith/ Hope this helps.
    1 point
  25. Correct, a new lubricant sponsor.
    1 point
  26. This is perhaps the nicest motorcycle road in the world, I don't think it could be designed any better. I'd love to see a hill-climb race being held there 👍
    1 point
  27. So I've heard this discussed a number of times at the school, both for myself and other students: as you lean the head/eyes will be farther inside the corner than the tires. Intellectually I understand this pretty well but as my pace increases and being able to hit the apex tightly becomes more important I'm finding it's hard to accomplish in practice. While I could try and just slowly move my apex target point farther inside, it feels like this could end badly. For example, a corner without curbing to give feedback you've reached the final part of the usable pavement would mean risking hitting dirt at high lean. It also feels like something hard to convince your brain to do ("I want to go one foot into the dirt at the apex"). Finally, slowing down too much would lower the lean angle required substantially, thus making the delta smaller and thus harder to work out a good methodology. I glanced through Twist II and didn't see anything that seemed to address this specific issue, though it's obviously possible I missed it. I'm enclosing a picture from Streets this last October which I think demonstrates it for anyone unfamiliar -- if I mentally had the right tech and awareness I'd probably move the tires a good foot or two closer to the apex, but that would put my head over the grass and the questionable pavement.
    1 point
  28. Hi guys, I hope you're all doing good. My name is Olivier, and I'm a riding instructor in France. I never took a CSS class, as we don't have a French CSS. But I read the books, watched the videos and been lurking on the forum. This one is the best I've ever seen on motorcycle riding. I trully believe that the techniques described by Keith can be used on the road. I had a flash yesterday. Correct me if I'm wrong, but PS is not rotating around your knee: it's all about pushing your body forward, isn't it? Thanks and have a good day.
    1 point
  29. On to something valuable is good, that's the way its been going since I started coaching way the hell back in 1976 🙂
    1 point
  30. FWIW, I don't try to see the tank in my peripheral vision ( I probably can on the BMW, but not on my little bike), but my outside arm is on it so I have a very good sense of where it is without having to see it.
    1 point
  31. Lebedo; I wasn't worried about you stealing my stuff, everything in the books and videos is for riders to improve themselves, if you see better ways to instruct from the books and videos and you see it helping your students, I'm happy about that. The bike should not stand up once pressure is released after the counter-steering pressure is applied. If the rider is crossed up as you illustrate in the photo then it WILL have the tendency to stand up. This is possible. Also, riders often restrain the bars with the opposite hand e.g., press the right bar to turn right but their left arm is stiff holding on to the left bar. They could be pushing or pulling on the left bar. If they are pushing on it the bike will stand up. When you instruct counter-steering you always look at both arms. The negative effects on handling from being too tight on the bars is well covered in" A Twist of the Wrist II" Keith
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. There is an online article quoting Rossi as saying his people had looked at the times for leg-dangle vs not and there was no difference. The article also had a humorous account of how racers will do odd things because they see other racers do them. https://motomatters.com/opinion/2009/07/22/the_truth_behind_the_rossi_leg_wave.html
    1 point
  34. I agree, I almost exclusively ride on the street now but have atleast 100,000 miles of racing and track riding under my belt, and all my riding I do now I only do it for fun not commuting. Safety is always the top prioroty for me but that said I have still managed to hit 7 deer on my motorcycles over the years, twice ending up in the emergency room for atleast a week each. maybe at 58 now, my visual skills and reaction times are not as good as they once were but I am positive they are still better than almost everyone I ride with, as I observe many of their riding behaviors and reactions and just think "wow" far too often. And I am also sure my visual and reaction skills and general motorcyle skills likely land me in the upper percent of riders as a whole, even if I ride far more cautiously (slow) than many of the worse riders around me who simply go at it with reckless abandon and zero fear of consequence. My biggest issue after the last two deer has been in having any confidence in my own riding, no confidence in the road conditions, in the possibility and knowledge it is highly probable that I will meet another deer or something big enough to hurt again. (besides the 7 deer, I can't even count how many squirrels, birds, and even a couple of dogs and a house cat, a mink, a skunk I have hit, then of course how many times a car or another motorcyclists has incroached into my lane many of which I had to take evasive manuevers to avoid) I have been riding about 5-8mph slower in the same conditions than I did prior to the last deer hit, at what are very sane speeds, slow enough I don't even worry about seeing police as they aren't even going to care about me speed now. This most recent deer encounter has had me off the bike now for 4 months and now, it is winter here already so another 5-6 months before I will be able to ride again. I get my final (I hope) surgery this Thursday so I can finally feel my foot again (microforiminotomy of L5) The sport I onced loved and enjoyed to the tune of 20,000-30,000+ miles every year has seen less than 15,000 miles over the past 5 seasons, 2 of those cut short due to deer hits. I have very low expectations for how I will ride next year when I can finally ride again, but am looking at making it the 800 miles to KY CSS next May for yet another round of learning and feeling better about riding and enjoying it more once again with better confidence in my own abilities. I feel like this last deer strike that nobody in the world could have avoided it (sans not being in that situation), but I still beat myself up over it. I was going about 65mph on a gradual uphill large sweeping curve with pretty good sitelines (so I thought) and zero traffic ever on it (about 4 houses total on the entire 5 miles stretch of road). I was riding along maybe 40*-43* lean angle in the left tire track of my lane when a deer simply jumped right out into the road in front of me at perhaps 20'-25' away so less than 0.1 seconds to see and react, I creamed right through it, headlights to deers head, it broke through the headlights, guages and windshield then its head hit me square in the ribs with its body wrapped around the right handlebar locking up the front brakes and pulling the bars to full right lock, starting a 20' front wheel slide before ejecting me and the deer off highside. Anyways while I stood there for about 15 minutes hoping someone would come by to help as no cell phone reception and I was riding solo, I looked over the 50' swath of broken plastics and crumpled up motorcycle and saw the well beaten down deer trail coming down from the hill and right to the road, so well used and travelled not a single blade of grass still standing on its 2' wide path of dirt while all the surrounding areas had grass and vegetation atleast 3' high. This was late morning atleast 5 hours after sunrise- but I had already seen atleast a dozen deer that morning already in the 100 miles I had ridden thus far and that is pretty normal for everytime I go ride. Help never did come on its own and I had to walk more than 1/4 mile with 5 broken ribs and a punctured lung to the nearest house to find someone to call an ambulance, thankfully they were home, the next and only other house I could see was atleast another 1/4 mile away. So one of the big things I have done while recovering. In my own interest of self preservation and safety; I bought an airbag vest and am having a custom made airbag compatible suit made with way more protection than anyone should ever need, it is likley going to weigh in double what the suit I had been wearing- but I prefer to not end up in ICU again if I can help it, I am also putting on lever guards like the racers use, or maybe more like the motorcrossers use- I am still looking for the right ones of those I want... The bike, well I am fixing it even if if isn't the cheapest option, mechanically it was fine but it tumbled and broke everything that had paint on it plus the gauges, headlights, all 4 signals, muffler, subframe bent, both bars bent etc.... but the engine runs, the forks and wheels are straight and the frame is straight and it has seen 4 of those deer hits in its 99,000 miles In 2015 I passed on going the airbag route although I highly considered it, but it was mostly a racing thing for the programmed versions and I don't like the idea of a tether and external bag. In hindsight, I wish I had bought an airbag then! It may not have saved the front two ribs from the deers head but it may well have saved the other 3 and the punctured lung and herniated discs?
    1 point
  35. What IS the purpose of the discussion, if you are not interested in handling issues? If this is a purely theoretical discussion and not directly related to real world riding, this is probably not the right forum for that sort of discussion.
    1 point
  36. Do we agree that if a rider sits up high, that the rider's COM is higher than that of the bike, producing a rotational "moment" that wants to make the bike rotate around the front tire's contact patch and create a "stoppie"? If we agree on this point, then the remaining questions is: does that situation cause more fork compression? My thinking is that yes, it would, because the "moment" created is a new force, in addition to the normal braking/deceleration force from mass of bike & rider. (The farther apart vertically the COM are, the bigger that "moment" becomes.) That rotational force, which centers around the front tire contact patch, can be resolved into two components, where the rider connects to the handlebars: a forward force and a downward force. It is that additional downward force that puts a new vertical load on the bars and THAT is what I think causes more fork compression. If the rider sits very low on the bike, and braces forward (instead of down) with his/her arms, I do not know if there would be any additional fork compression. My guess is that there would not be. However handling would still be negatively affected simply because the pressure on the bars restricts handlebar movement and if there are any imperfections in the road, the bars cannot move as they need to, to compensate. And obviously if the rider is entering a corner it is much more difficult to make a precise steering input when one's weight is on the bars. The reality on an S1000rr is that they have unbelievable stopping power, and at maximum braking it is quite difficult to hold on well enough with your lower body to have zero pressure on the bars, especially on a hard braking track over the course of a long race. That said, when would it be MOST important for rider to be light on the bars? During straight line braking or when entering a corner? When is the best time to get the hardest braking done, straight up or leaned over? If a rider does have some pressure on the bars during hardest braking, is it better to be sitting straight upright, or to be down low? Is it better for any bar pressure to be forward on the bars, or downwards?
    1 point
  37. Oh, now I understand your question and see why you are asking. Yes the front tire has to stop the mass of the bike and rider. The total mass (and thus the braking force required to stop it) doesn't change. However, the location of the rider's center of mass CAN change, and if the riders C.O.M. is significantly higher than the bike's center of mass, that introduces a new element, which is the lever action of the rider's upper body. That introduces a "moment", which is a rotational force, which acts (if the rider is bracing on the bars and using the bars to hold up the upper body during braking) directly on the handlebars and thus the forks. We can talk about the theory of it but really It is very easy for you to go test this - put a zip tie on the front fork of your bike, tight enough to stay in place but not so tight that it cannot be moved at all. Slide it up to the top. Set or choose braking markers so you can be consistent in braking distance, and go out and brake hard in a straight line, riding with your knees tightly locked to the tank, your chest low on bike, and keep your arms loose. Measure or photograph how far the zip tie got pushed down. Then go back out and do the same braking run with the same approach speed*, but this time sit up tall and lock your arms, don't lock your legs or support your body with your core muscles, let the handlebars do all the work of keeping your upper body from tipping forward. See if the fork travel is different. *NOTE - wear all your gear and be careful doing this, it IS possible to get into a "stoppie" or create a front tire slide, the weight on the bars and the restriction on the bars can really change the handling under braking. You may want to do a few initial runs at a lower braking intensity to get a sense of what will happen. If the front end is not super stiff (spring weight too high for the rider, or compression damping way too high, or forks bound) you should see a measurable difference in fork travel between one riding position and the other. Or, even better you can come to a school and ride our Braking Bike, which has outriggers to help stabilize the bike in case of a front end tuck or slide, and try both ways and see how it impacts the bike behavior and your ability to retain control under heavy braking.
    1 point
  38. No the rider's mass clearly doesn't change. However, we know the braking is causing a force on the rider. Where is the rider attaching to the bike in each scenario? Where does the force get transmitted to the bike, if the rider locks his arms arms and uses his hands to stay on the bike? What about if he uses his knees instead? How does the change the effect on the bike, on the forks? Hint: consider the location of the bike's center of mass, and how close or far away the rider's attachment point is from that, in each scenario.
    1 point
  39. Great to see the responses on this. Some years ago a coach missed T-boning a car at an intersection. This boulevard had a median, and tall curbing on the street-side edges. The car pulled across the median and then stopped in his lane. He steered quickly right, but had to also steer it back left (or hit that tall curbing). Both the visual skill (of not target fixing) and able to turn it quickly, are practiced skills, saved his bacon that day. It's a recommendation for simply getting onto a track now and again. Practicing riding technique in a controlled environment is beneficial all by itself (and we'd say with some good coaching even better :). But even if one doesn't get some coaching, but gets onto a track now and again, this will help to keep one's margin for street riding a little more comfortable. Same coach told us after his first endurance race, his next street ride felt in slow motion. An incident that would have before been a panic, was now a yawn. Do I sound like a track proponent? Best, Cobie
    1 point
  40. I'm pretty lazy, I like the F-800, probably even with saddle bags. Pretty impressive all round bike. Would love more power, like a 1000 version, so I can be more lazy and not have to shift much :). Failing that...the single R (1000) is a sweet ride.
    1 point
  41. Body Position The most obvious thing about any rider is their form on the bike. How do they sit and move on it? What’s their posture? Do they look comfortable or awkward, stiff or loose, Moto GP, or nervous-novice? Good body positioning isn’t just about being stylish——you can play dress-up in your older brother's or sister's cool boots but walking will be clumsy——it has a desirable result and we can define 'good body positioning'. Harmony with the bike, freedom of movement on it, precision control over it―with the minimum necessary effort. Survival Reactions Play a Role The bike itself can force poor riding posture. A shift lever positioned a ¼ inch too high or too low manipulates the rider into awkward and uncomfortable poses, limiting his control over it. Even with perfect control positioning, good form on the bike has its difficulties. Achieving it may look and even feel like it’s reserved for the young and flexible. This may be true to a degree but many of its problems are actually brought on by our own Survival Reactions, our SRs. For example, a rider who instinctively levels the horizon by tilting his head in corners, creates unnecessary tension in his body. Basics Apply Good form is difficult for riders who struggle with basics: uncertainty with basics has a physical manifestation. Just as joy or anger are obvious in someone, these uncertainties manifest themselves in awkward and unsuitable body positions. For example: poor throttle control prompts riders to rely on slash and burn hard drives out of the turns. Their 'ready-for-action', rigid body language telegraphs their intention. That tense anticipation of the drive off the turns loses them the handling benefits of being relaxed mid-corner. The Stages of Body Positioning There are three stages to body positioning: Poor form + poor riding = ripple-effect, snowballing errors. Good riding + poor form = good but limited range of control. Good form + good technical riding skills = riding that is both fluid and efficient. Number 3 is the goal of any rider training. The Ingredients Body Positioning has five distinct ingredients. The bike and how it is configured——its controls, seat, pegs and bar positioning. The rider's understanding of body positioning——how to properly position himself on the bike and why. Our Survival Reactions——how they create unwanted and often unconscious tension and positioning problems. Lack of riding basics——has or hasn't mastered the core technical skills needed to ride well. The rider's own physical limitations——height, weight, flexibility, conditioning. With those five points under control, specific techniques can be employed to achieve positive benefits in bike control. Form, Function and Technique GP body position does not address or improve 90% of the most basic and vital components of riding: Our sense of traction, speed, lean angle, braking, and line, to name a few, are not directly dependent upon or necessarily improved by stylish form. Clearly, body positioning isn't the universal panacea some think it is, but it has its place. For example, holding the body upright, counter to the bike’s lean while cornering has several negative effects. Among these, is the fact that it positions the rider so he can’t fully relax. This can be quickly corrected and solves the functional problem of tension from cramped and restrictive joint alignment: a key element in allowing any rider to relax. A bike related example would be too high or too low brake or clutch lever. It puts the rider's wrist into misalignment and restricts fluid movement. The Rules of Technique Here are my guidelines for technique. Any riding technique is only as good as: The validity of the principles it rests on. Example: The benefits of hanging off follow physics and engineering principles. The access it provides to the technology with which the bike is designed and constructed. Are the potentials of chassis, suspension and power able to be utilized as intended? Does the technique embrace them? The consistency with which it can be applied. Does it work in all similar situations? The degree of control it provides for the rider. Can the rider either solve problems or make improvements, or both, by using it? The ease with which it can be understood and coached. Does it take extraordinary experience or skill to apply it, or, can it be broken down into bite sized pieces for any rider to master? Which brings us to my first law of body positioning. Stability Comes in Pairs. Bike and rider stability are always paired―rider instability transfers directly to the bike. Body Positioning has but one overriding guideline: Rider stability. How a rider connects to the bike can bring about harmony and control and fluid movement or turn into an uncoordinated wrestling match. Ideal Stability Having stability AND fluidity of movement sounds conflicting; when something is stable it’s expected to stay put, unmoving, like the foundation of your house or the roots of a tree. But the opposite is true for riding. Comfort And Stability What works well on a paddock-stand doesn't always transfer to real riding. Aftermarket rearsets, which can be adjusted (or which are manufactured) too far up, back, forward or down is an example. In the paddock they feel racy; on the road or track they can fatigue the rider. The fatigue comes from the rider's core not being correctly supported. This causes him to be off balance. Off-balance generates extra effort from muscle tension and poor joint alignment which in turn hampers accurate control manipulations. Awkward looking body position is what you see. Riders often accept or try and work around this, without realizing its negative impact on their riding. Simply Complicated Through research and coaching of tens of thousands of riders of all skill levels, 58 separate elements which influence our body positioning have surfaced. Seemingly simple things such as too tight a pair of gloves or leathers can affect all the other elements. Once the 58 are corrected and integrated, the rider has many more options; opening doors to a wide range of fun, efficient and, you might say, elegant techniques. All of our coaches have been thoroughly drilled on what each of the 58 are and how to correct them. © 2014 Keith Code, all rights reserved. This article may not be reproduced in any form without the author's consent.
    1 point
  42. Speed and Direction When riders say they would like to increase their confidence and control, what do they mean? Aside from pleasing the eye and entertaining discussions about them, all motorcycles have the same six controls–throttle, front brake, rear brake, clutch, gear lever and handle bars. Those six controls are how we change or maintain the speed and the direction of the bike. And, that is all they do and it is all you do while riding. Good control amounts to correctly choosing where and how much you change the speed and direction of the bike. Likewise, any and all decisions you make are based on changing or maintaining speed and direction. The bike is more than likely capable of performing well but in those moments of confidence shattering doubt, the rider isn’t. All dramatic situations on any motorcycle have been and always will be based on the rider's inability to correctly change or maintain its speed or direction. Aside from mechanical failures there are no other "situations". Someone could argue that point: “What about hitting an on or off ramp diesel spill; that doesn’t fit the maxim above?” I’d have to agree. However, the majority of motorcycle accidents these days are single vehicle, loss of control in a corner, crashes–not ones which no one can control. Speed and direction changes can be limited by the individual machine's controllability factors. Its handling of the road's surface and potential for stability are based on its suspension and frame configuration; its throttle response; gearing and braking characteristics and the tires' compatibility with all of the above plus electronic intervention that can alter your direct control over them such as ABS and traction control. Problems in controllability aren't bad. They are the road signs which have lead designers and engineers towards machine improvement from the beginning. For example, it hardly matters whether suspension was first conceived to achieve better traction on bumpy roads or to provide a smoother ride to eliminate the need for kidney belts. Both were situations that caused problems. Suspension did result in a whole new range of potentials for controlling speed and direction and a significantly more hospitable machine for rider comfort. Any rider's true skill level can only be measured by his ability to determine exactly WHERE to change or maintain speed and direction and execute the right AMOUNT of each. There are no other components to skill. While riding, the combinations of speed and direction inputs result in arriving somewhere: for example staying in your lane or using a late apex to handle a decreasing radius corner. Confidence is achieved when the rider is certain that the machine is going in the right direction and will arrive at a predictable location, at the right speed. You might need to be stopped or to swerve before hitting a car which pulled out, or it could be exiting the banking at Daytona wide open at the top of 6th gear doing 175 mph pointed down the straight––not at the wall. It makes no difference, both are determined by where and how much the rider changed or maintained their speed and direction. The ability of a rider to determine speed and direction changes relies solely on the amount of space they have to work with. This is the determining factor for where to change and how much to change them. Judgment could be defined as: fitting the right degree of speed and/or direction change into the amount of available space in order to arrive or not arrive (like missing a pot hole) somewhere. This leads us into the area of the rider’s visual aptitude. On a practical level, always having a destination plotted out in front is wise. The five faults that stand in your way are target fixating on something, compulsive over-scanning, tunneled vision, looking too close or too far ahead. Your visual skill is based on how many of those five are absent– anytime and anywhere you ride. Becoming aware of the five and gaining control over them WILL lead to improvement.
    1 point
  43. On the street my absolute number one priority is safety. On the street I’m constantly trying to remain conscious of the variables outside of my control: most notably these include road conditions (loose gravel or a boulder in the middle of a blind turn), wildlife, oncoming traffic crossing over the double yellow, and the unimaginable/unexpected (like a Porsche making a 3-point U-turn in the middle of a blind corner on Mulholland, yes it happens). The most valuable tool I’ve learned from CSS for increased safety on the street is Wide Vision - without practicing wide vision it’s impossible to look through a corner and reserve attention/awareness for the unexpected. Wide vision and riding at 70-80% of my ability on the street has served me well. That way, hopefully, I become aware of the unexpected ASAP and I’ve got an extra $2-3 in savings to spend on it.
    1 point
  44. I think visual skills are far more important than the others listed. I think your school thinks so too You teach that and throttle control first because it's the foundation of all the other skills in that those two things keep you mentally ahead of the action unfolding in front of you. The only other thing I would add as a skill is being smooth and steady on the controls. If your vision and throttle control are good, I think you'll find that those quick reflexes, bravery, and other skills will get tested less often!!
    1 point
  45. I guess you could miss your shift/clutch timing, but that probably doesn't happen very often. Most people are more likely to miss the rpm match when blipping the throttle. Let's say you need 12000 rpm for a smooth engagement of the next lower gear. If you pull the clutch and only blip to 8000 rpm before releasing the clutch, you will have a shock that will still be softened, especially since the gears are already engaged. If you hammer in the next lower gear with even moderately too few or too many revs, you will hear it very, very well because nothing gives. Doing clutchless downshifting is fine if you master it, and it will be easy for some to learn, harder for others. Personally, there are other things I'd focus on before worrying about acquiring this skill. After all, most world champions have - and do - use the clutch on downshifts, so the practice cannot be considered completely debilitating
    1 point
  46. Another myth perpetuated by the internet and simply untrue. How convenient to omit the other half of the information in your quote. You should be a politician. Do you honestly belive a badly mismatched downshift without using the clutch will not cause greater stress on the gearbox than if you let a slipping clutch take up most of the shock?
    1 point
  47. Okay Stuman, Here's my perfect opportunity to be a smart-ass to keep all of us from being dumb-asses: Tell us why we shouldn't believe the internet and instead believe 'some guy on the internet'?
    1 point
  48. Another myth perpetuated by the internet and simply untrue.
    1 point
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