Jump to content

marioo

Members
  • Content Count

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

marioo last won the day on August 6

marioo had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

About marioo

  • Rank
    Squid

Previous Fields

  • Have you attended a California Superbike School school?
    Yes
  1. When you are working body position on stands, look for RPs in relation to the bike so you can replicate it on the track. Where is your head in relation to the wind screen, chest to the tank, angle and extension of your arms. Another thing you might add to your homework is to look at the track on google earth. That's actually my homework this weekend. I am racing there next weekend with WERA. One thing I do for my track notes is PDF print each turn and sometimes additional sections, and add my RPs. Usually a little X is all I use. Nothing fancy just pre-planning a path and visuals to pick
  2. Hi Apollo Part one "screwdriver hand". Try transitioning to lower body positions when your bike is on stands. Position your hand on the grip in a normal position during turn entry, only snugging up the index finger and thumb all other fingers completely loose. As your upper body drops in keep your wrist straight with your forearm/elbow and relaxed. Screwdriver hand will happen automatically if you relax and let it. Once you get that part down and want to apply it on track, you will be finding new positions that you prefer on the grip, usually a little closer to the end. That's the pa
  3. RChase I am also riding an S1000RR (and racing it), moving up from a bike that had half the HP. I completely get where you are coming from. I agree that you have a combination of factors going on. The best way to deal with them is one at a time. Life above 100mph. Think about it, most people you walk up to on the street have never been 100mph in a car let alone on a motorcycle. Things start happening pretty fast. Your visual and motor skills need to adjust to get the correct timing. I would have to guess humans weren't designed to go that fast, probably why we get so passionate about doin
  4. Ya that is funny. Not all the pages came up...or I missed em. I thought it was odd the way the story ended. Also saw your racing blog congrats.
  5. Hi Yellow Duck First of all I have to let you know I agree with Bullet about asking question instead of just giving answers, it works cause your the only one that knows the answer to what's in your head. The answer doesn't matter if you don't believe it. Second, you haven't convinced me you don't trust your tires. Sounds like you trust your tires everywhere but one place. I am convinced your scared to go slow in second gear and bang the bike over to max lean angle. That's probably more of a survival instinct than an SR. As discussed earlier, the bike is inherently less stable at low speed
  6. I am just finishing a personal experiment on trying to find the best weight for me as a racer. Of course this is not scientific, just the results I found. My conclusion is the harder you ride, the more weight and muscle to fat ratio matter. I am 5'11" and normal morning strip weight was 180lbs. My experiment weight ranged from 165 lbs to 195 lbs. My muscle to fat ratio varied also but to keep that short, it matters. When I was racing on small bikes (NSR50, ninja 250) it was obvious that my weight and surface area were handicapping me against smaller riders. I found myself tucking in the b
×
×
  • Create New...