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RocketPunch

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Posts posted by RocketPunch


  1. I was wondering if it's a good idea to install tank traction pads (i.e. StompGrip, TechSpec, etc.) on the tank? what are pros and cons?

     

    Pros: More stability when cornering and especially under braking, traction provide essential weight transfer point from rider to center mass of bike, and frees the rider's arms/hand to "control" the bike and not using it as a brace.

     

    Cons: It cost money. Probably the best $40 I ever spent.


  2. I see someone had already made a thread.

     

    I am also at that 2 Day Camp and Lyle is also my coach (Yellow #25), and I picked up a lot from his coaching ^_^.

     

    I had a great time learned a ton and the S1000RR totally rips. The bike is so compact like a 600 but with insane amount of hp, seat height is no higher than my R6; Very easy to handle and go fast. The brakes are even more impressive than the power it makes.

     

    Thunderbolt is a great circuit! Got a good mix or corners and elevation changes, very fun. I am planning to do my Level 3 & 4 as soon as I can.

     

    Thanks!! ^_^

     

    Some track shots of me and some pictures I took at the event, enjoy!

     

    30630_394416969293_544884293_3948679_838894_n.jpg

     

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    30630_394416854293_544884293_3948663_5313927_n.jpg

     

    30630_394416859293_544884293_3948664_8205143_n.jpg

     

    30630_394416869293_544884293_3948665_5583448_n.jpg

     

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    30630_394416944293_544884293_3948676_2464648_n.jpg

     

    30630_394416959293_544884293_3948677_3261894_n.jpg


  3. It depends on the club, but even the best club with best rules can't guarantee there will be no idiots running in them. I learn to ride, got my M class for the pure reason so I can do trackdays, keep my fast riding at the track and so I don't have to do it on the street. There is an obvious reason to the "passing on the outside" rule. If I want a low risk activity, I can resort to oversize vacuum tube spectating and I am not saying it because I am 22 and think I am invincible. I simply think if you want to ride fast, you should keep it off the street and take it to the track.

     

    Until the day people can think of a fail-safe way to run a trackday or school where you do not need to sign any release forms and can guarantee you won't get hurt or no one will crash, don't see how it can get better.


  4. Just to beat a dead horse some more...

     

    ... here's a video of our mechanic Will at vegas last weekend. Now if you know Will, you know he is not prone to doing stuff that is going to hurt HIS bikes. He is the one that is going to have to fix them after all. And yet he never uses the clutch to downshift, is smooth as silk and one of the fastest riders I know.

     

     

    Sorry the angle isn't that great, but it is only a couple minutes long to bare with it.

     

    Nice vid. I recall I did it by accident a few times, and I was like....wtf just happened... :blink::lol:


  5. Just to beat a dead horse some more...

     

    ... here's a video of our mechanic Will at vegas last weekend. Now if you know Will, you know he is not prone to doing stuff that is going to hurt HIS bikes. He is the one that is going to have to fix them after all. And yet he never uses the clutch to downshift, is smooth as silk and one of the fastest riders I know.

     

     

    Sorry the angle isn't that great, but it is only a couple minutes long to bare with it.

     

    Nice vid. I recall I did it by accident a few times, and I was like....wtf just happened... :blink::lol:


  6. Now the search continues to the boots and gloves. I'm thinking of getting a more casual pair for now to save money (rather than a full-blown racing pair since the only ones that would fit my tree trunk calves are the $$$Sidis). What's the school requirement? And for gloves?

     

    Don't see it being specified on CCS's site, but gauntlet glove is generally the standard for schools and track days. You don't have to spend a lot on boots and gloves, or even the suit. I would also suggest a back protector if don't already have one.

     

    How much did you pay for your used A*?


  7. Hello Fellow Bikers,

     

    Just a quick post to introduce myself. I am a new rider to the Sport bike scene as last summer was my first sport bike. It was an 2008 Honda CBR1000rr and as great as that bike is I just felt out of place on it since I was coming of a Victory Vegas Cruiser.

     

    But after a few months of riding I began to really love the speed and control of the Sport Bikes. I really thought that since I was in my 40's a cruiser would be more comfortable to ride. I was wrong...

     

    So I sold the Honda in November and ordered my new BMW S1000rr.

     

    Hopefully I can get to the two day school this year.

     

    And living in the North East (New Brunswick, Canada) I can't wait for the snow to be gone and the warm weather to come so I can continue improving my riding skills.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Bootre

     

    Good choice on bike. Where will you be doing your CCS?


  8. I was wondering if anyone knew a place to get a decent suit without breaking the bank. I have a wife and kid that I support on one pay check so can't really pay thousands. Thanks for your help and input in advance.

     

    Joe

     

    You can get a good brand new suit for $300~$400 USD easy, for around $600 USD can get a custom suit. They might be cheap, but they are by no means "no name" brands. Comfort is the key, if you can spend a bit more on a custom suit.

     

    You don't HAVE to buy A*'s or Dai's, spend the money on track days instead..... :lol::lol:


  9. Good points Harnois, we just need some 500 mile full throttle batteries, eh? Or another source of energy yet...

     

    IMO, fuel cell is the future.

     

    And, I have seen slipper clutches not work (meaning the rear did lock up, bounce around).

     

    I did screw up a downshift a little bit while doing some "spirited" riding on the street and the rear end kicked out a little bit when I downshifted to 2nd. I'm pretty sure my 08" GSXR600 has a slipper clutch on it stock. It didn't lock but it was fairly close to it. It let me back it into the corner a little bit by accident. I backed my dirtbike into many corners but doing it on a sportbike was a completely different experience which I hope I don't do again soon! :huh:

     

    I wasn't to far off matching the RPMs either. It was probably about 2,000rpm lower then I needed when I let the clutch out. It could have been more, its not something I was paying to much attention to at the time.

     

    Don't the slipper clutch needs to be dialed in to match the type of riding? I am pretty sure most people riding on the street never bothered to spend the time to adjust the slipper clutch, just like most people don't realize the OEM rear spring is most likely over sprung for their weight.

     

    This became a bigger problem when the rider solely depends on the slipper clutch thinking nothing he/she can do that will lock the rear up.

     

    I hadn't heard of synchro-rev but I read about it and it sounds like it would be pretty fun in a car, or bike I guess!....

  10. ...In a couple decades we'll have powerful long-range electric bikes and this whole silly shifting business will be a thing of the past that only old guys remember, so what's the point in even worrying about it?

    :D

     

    Don't have to wait for decades, the slipper clutch had already done that for bikes. Just like what DSG transmission and Nissan's SynchroRev Match did to the skill of heel & toe downshifting....


  11. If what he meant by dropping 3 gears with 1 blip meant disengage the clutch > drop 2 gears > blip > drop the last gear; it will work.

     

    However, I don't think it will works as well as stepping the rev matching down one gear at a time as you decelerate, and I think more concentration will have to be diverted to keep track of multiple downshift with one clutch action. I personal feel the blip>drop, blip>drop more rhythmatic and natural, which in my case helps me put more concentration on something else.


  12. In the DVD, A Twist of The Wrist II, it is recommended to blip the throttle between each gear change. If you know you need to drop 3 gears before a turn could you not just keep the clutch disengaged while you drop the gears down and just blip the throttle once?

     

    The blip will not last long enough to make the "rev matching" effective after banging 3 gears down; but let say you did managed to bang 3 gears down for the blip, you will also render the concept of "rev matching" useless as now you will for sure over rev the bike and lock the rear up (no-slipper clutch bike)


  13. Hey guys,

     

    I had been trying to get a group of us Triumph riders to sign up, but everyone's been taking their sweet time deciding while there weren't too many spots left. I've been wanting to do take the class for a long time now, so I signed myself up today to make sure I got a spot!

     

    A few questions:

    1) I'm signed up for 3 single days: Level I on May 10, Level II on May 11, and Level III on May 14. Do you guys think that's too much in too little time to really maximize the experience? I'm a long time street rider, but have never been on the track.

     

    2) I've signed up to use my own bike mainly because of the costs. I have a 2008 Triumph Street Triple, and I know there are people who use it on the track... but it's got a handle bar and is designed to be ridden in an upright position. I'm replacing the rear shock with one from the Daytona 675 (the sister, sport model) this winter, but the stock front forks weren't really intended for the track and have no adjustability. On the one hand, I think using my bike would really allow me to gain more confidence on it. But on the other hand, I'm not sure if I'll be missing out not learning on a real sportbike? Also, how much wear and tear would I be putting on my bike?

     

    3) Anyone else going from the Tri-state area?

     

    Looks like I've got lots of studying to do this winter! I really can't wait for the class!!!

     

    Cheers,

    JT

     

    I am from Albany. Doing back to back track days are very common, so I believe you should be fine. If you are already in a routine doing exercises keeping the physical and stamina up, you should not have a problem at all. Otherwise it is never too late to start.

     

    I am doing a 2 day at NJMP in May, if you have the means consider doing the 2 day camp and get to ride the S1000RR at the same time.... ^_^

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