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mugget

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Everything posted by mugget

  1. I will have to search the forum when I have a chance, pretty sure it was discussed but that would be years ago... At the track right now, felt so much better even in the first session. At this track it feels like I’ve come home. 🙂 Working through some drills, feeling more comfortable with the tyres moving around over all the bumps and creases I know in the track. Looking through my notes on the pickup drill - think they could be wrong somehow... I wrote “How: straighten inside arm”. But that would be the same as pushing the bar to counter steer? It should be straighten the outs
  2. Thanks Hotfoot. I will definitely take it easy and work on the drills, last thing I want is to have SRs kicking in. I’ve been using warmers for a while now, so no dramas there I’m used to pretty much getting stuck into it straight out of the pits - altho usually I can feel the limit of the tyres better - probably a combination of all the different things causing me not to have that same feel straight away made me a bit apprehensive. But I’ll focus on the drills and let it come to me. Great to hear the Twist II video is available online! I loaned my DVD to a friend and he mu
  3. Cheers Yakaru, makes sense. I do actually have my own notebook as well as the CSS workbooks but didn’t take them to the last track days... thought that would be a bit much to manage with all the changes and being so long between rides. But looking back I think that may have been the one thing that would have really helped. Will definitely take them tomorrow. I usually make notes after each session, things I know I need to fix or improve, and little breakthroughs or discoveries I’ve made. I think it’s more the act of putting pen to paper that helps... and if something is working the w
  4. Hi all, Well life has done what it does and kept me off motorcycles for the last 2 years... before that I'd only done track riding for 3-4 years and had done up to Level 3, made some really good progress and found myself in the fastest group at track days. I did a double track day in early September at basically a new track (I'd ridden it once 5-6 years ago), honestly didn't think it would take me that long to get back up to speed but I wasn't doing as well as I'd hoped and probably had unrealistic expectations of being able to just get back into it. Add into the mix that I've put
  5. I didn't really think it would be that special until I saw the below video and after reading your post there it all makes sense. Like you say - what they have done is amazing, you end up with a completely different machine building from ground up as a track/race bike rather than trying to turn a street bike into a race bike. Ducati Desmosedici RR used to be my "dream bike", but the way technology is advancing so quickly and with all this being available to Joe Public (if you have the cash...) well let's just say it's a great time to be alive!
  6. Cheers for the tip! I had completely forgotten about leather sliders, read about them years ago but have never seen anyone who uses them. Does anyone here use them or have a preference? I think there's really only two options - Klucky Pucks from Woodcraft, or Asphalt & Gas sliders? I will be getting myself a pair to try out. I also think the sliders that came with my leathers are really low profile to start with (it's a budget suit). At the narrowest section they only protrude about 17mm (0.6") from the suit.
  7. Interesting point! Cheers! One of the reasons that I didn't want to use my knee as a lean angle gauge is that when your knee touches down, it doesn't mean that you can't lean any more. I prefer to spend my attention on feeling traction at the tyres and use that as my gauge. But I guess I'll just have to make an effort to try and stop pulling my leg in towards the bike... if you expect your knee to touch down, that means it can't surprise you, right?!?
  8. This point caught my attention... how many people actually use the rear brake to tighten their line?? No one. Rear brake does not tighten line, if it seems that way it's because there is always additional rider input beyond simple rear brake actuation - such as body position change, handle bar input etc. So don't worry, you're not doing anything wrong and you're not missing out on anything. On the point of not having confidence in the front tyre - if you look at any mid-corner crash that doesn't involve throttle, there is almost always brake involved. Therefore if you remove the u
  9. I just did a track day, and during the day I got to thinking that I really need to start using my knee sliders and get comfortable using them. After a lot of big improvements in quick succession (suspension upgrades that gave much better feel & improved confidence, started using tyre warmers so I gun it into the first corner and don't waste time) I've found myself getting surprised the few times a knee slider touches down. Sometimes it's just because my inside leg bounces and the slider almost "slaps" the track over a bumpy section, other times it's just that I'm carrying that much l
  10. Just to be clear - when I talk about "maximum lean" in my own riding I'm talking about my lean angle in any given corner, not the actual possible maximum. But if tyres start sliding a lot more than usual in combination with greater than usual lean angle, it probably doesn't mean that I can't lean more, go faster, etc. - but I'd sure be paying careful attention to that feedback and wouldn't push too much more. Yeah plenty of fast guys don't need a massive knee slider budget for a year of racing. I did some training with Wayne Maxwell once and he goes through about 3 sets of sliders a year,
  11. Not using my knee sliders, my thoughts on maximum lean angle and gauging surface traction are that it can be done simply by paying attention to feedback from the tyres and adjusting my riding based on this. For example if I was using more lean angle than usual and noticed increased sliding at maximum lean I'd take that to mean that it's pretty close to the maximum lean angle the tyres can take. The other thing having gone so long without actually using knee sliders is that it's almost at a point where I feel it would be a distraction if I was regularly using them without actually being c
  12. Ok so if someone was exploring trail braking (moreso deep trail braking?) or raising their corner entry/mid-corner speed I can see that could be an area where using the knee slider could be beneficial, perhaps mostly as a safety device to save slides?
  13. Wish I had a computer to look at the video frame by frame... but I don't think there's anything too mysterious happening here... For those who have ever done a quick change of direction through a slalom or short chicane you might have noticed that it takes very little throttle (or any at all, if the steering rate is so quick?) to lift the front wheel as the bike is coming upright on the change of direction. This is because the steering rate is so great, you have the inertia of the bike coming from lean to upright, the mass of the bike combined with that inertia means that it wants to keep
  14. I thought of this when I saw your post... Dave Moss comes out with some very insightful comments every now and then: Take particular note of your clip on angle as well as the position relative to the forks. To me moving the clip ons 30mm in front of the forks is a fairly radical setup, but what I take away from this is that the riders comfort and ergonomic fit is the highest priority. Move the controls to wherever you need them, the bike is always going to steer better for you if you can use the controls more effectively.
  15. Hi all, I was just reading one of Dave Moss post on Facebook and it really got me thinking... here's the post: And here's my comment on that post: Very interesting post... lots to think about. Makes me wonder if I have been missing the benefits of an important learning tool all this time... Like everyone when I started out I viewed "knee down" almost as the pinnacle of riding technique. As time went on I realised that getting a knee down is not an end goal in itself, it's the product of correct riding technique. I also thought that I didn't want t
  16. Seems like we have crossed wires here... The point I am getting at is that there is no reason to view coasting as something bad or undesirable. In fact unless someone is an exceptionally skilled rider and is either using brake or throttle all of the time, then they have to be coasting to some degree! Why is it that people tend to avoid coasting, why does it make them feel uncomfortable? Thinking back to before I had any type of training, I definitely felt uncomfortable when coasting - and this was wholly due to the fact that I didn't have a clear understanding of correct throttle use
  17. Hhmmm... unless it's a fast corner or a slow entry into a faster corner, I tend to have the throttle closed when coming into a corner. PGI - Yes I think that definition of charging a corner is pretty spot on. I don't think it has so much to do with chopping the throttle or abrupt brake control (they are riding errors in their own right). The reason I made that comment about coasting into corners is that it's absolutely the safest way I've found to build confidence and work up to a higher corner entry speed. When you realise what the biggest danger is you'll proba
  18. This caught my attention... why do you call coasting bad? It made me curious because coasting into corners has been one of my preferred corner entry methods for a long time. Consider what happens when you turn into a corner and don't touch the throttle - what would happen to your line? Would that ever be useful to you?
  19. I think there's a lot of emphasis on getting your head low, but that isn't everything... as Cobie alluded to, Level 3 explains everything about it. I would just add that it's similar to knee down - if you are trying to get your knee down - if you're trying to get your head low, then you're doing it wrong. These shouldn't be goals in themselves, but are end results of correct riding technique. Before I did Level 3 I would try and hold my body in all kinds of uncomfortable positions through the corner. Afterwards, I wasn't getting anywhere near as tired, riding took less effort and my
  20. Hhmmm... maybe it's just something you get used to, seeing as there are so many different throttle ratios on different bikes anyway.
  21. Interesting, I've never really felt the need for this sort of thing or a "quick throttle". I think lots of guys swap the R6 throttle onto Gixxers but I've never had a problem that I felt I needed to fix. I do have to wonder how it would affect high-RPM rear wheel slides if you have less throttle range to manage that with... That has always been the one big turn off for me.
  22. Joe really need experience. But there are two kinds of experience - bad and good. It doesn't do you any good if you have "10 years of riding experience", but it's all bad experience! You can gain good experience through the application of systematic training that teaches the core basics of motorcycling. I wish I had started on a dirt bike - lower speeds and having a little spill at low speed on dirt sure is a lot less intimidating than crashing on the street (or heaven forbid, track)! Don't over estimate what is required of you at CSS just because they're held on a race track... My
  23. Just coming back to this thread now as I've had some new questions raised after talking with someone who was adamant that all engines should always be fuelled with the highest possible octane rating, that they will always run better with a higher octane fuel. So - is it actually true that a higher octane fuel will "burn slower", or do the additives only change the volatility? Meaning that higher octane fuel is more resistant to pre-ignition, but that once there is spark both low/high octane fuels will ignite just as easily and burn just as quickly?? This also lead me to the subject
  24. Haha yeah that is a cool photo from practice. On the grid before the race one of the commentators asked him why he was trying to get his helmet on the ground, he said he was just enjoying himself! And after the race on the cool down lap he did actually touch his helmet on the ground. Not trying to achieve anything other than just playing around! Lean angle is already so high, so he just decided to dip his head down & see if it was possible. Maybe he also saw the "Ghillie Man" video and wanted to join the club.
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