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Giving Me Fits


Jaybird180
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I have a set of turns that I use as one of my practice areas. If you're around then you may have heard or ridden "Harry S". It's the final section that in my mind, I cannot seem to find the ideal line(s).

 

Best description I can give is that the entrance is a slight uphill, on cambered right turn that feeds into a constant radius downhill turn. The last part of the turn (tricky part) becomes (what seems) a decreasing radius with a crest on the inside at the exit.

 

Finding a good line is further hindered by the fact that there is a crack following most of the turn. I like to be on the outside of the crack at entrance, follow the turn, and then change line to cross the crack near the end of the downhill portion just prior to the decreasing radius and aim for the inside, where I can then get over the crest and let 'er drift just a bit to the outside.

 

I wish I had some footage to help.

 

This stuff plays over in my mind, and I can't seem to get comfortable with the last part.

 

I think I have a good line because I can use Throttle rule #1 on the outside of the "bowl" and allow other riders to hug the inside while I continue to motor along a few mph faster.

 

Any advice for my favorite practice area?

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TOTW 1 talks about variable camber.

 

The bottom line is that you want to plan your line through variable camber corners to be at your greatest lean angle at the least amount of camber.

 

Or, in other words, the line that allows you to follow throttle rule #1.

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TOTW 1 talks about variable camber.

 

The bottom line is that you want to plan your line through variable camber corners to be at your greatest lean angle at the least amount of camber.

 

Or, in other words, the line that allows you to follow throttle rule #1.

How should I gauge my desired product for this "practice area"? My corner speed has picked up 10 mph so how do I know when I'm "done"?

 

I guess that question can be asked of any type of riding, but this in particular is non-competitive. My only judgment is the satisfaction and happiness of when I know that I got it right, which doesn't happen often.

 

I don't understand your reference about least camber and greatest lean. A line change solves the camber problem. I also realized that I may be placing too much attention on this crack, allowing IT to dictate my line selection.

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TOTW 1 talks about variable camber.

 

The bottom line is that you want to plan your line through variable camber corners to be at your greatest lean angle at the least amount of camber.

 

Or, in other words, the line that allows you to follow throttle rule #1.

I don't understand your reference about least camber and greatest lean. A line change solves the camber problem. I also realized that I may be placing too much attention on this crack, allowing IT to dictate my line selection.

 

Camber is "banking" on the track. Camber can be positive or negative. Or both if the road is crowned (high in the middle) or troughed (low in the middle). So, the least amount of camber is the least amount of banking. The road surface can "fall away" from your line or the apex and this is called negative camber.

 

If the corner is banked early and it goes away, it is the same as a decreasing radius and the point where least camber occurs is your limit for the corner, ie. if you hold a consistent line, that is the point where your max lean will occur by default as the road will be leaning up to meet your inside knee. If the corner is banked early and you are at max lean, you will need to lift up when you get to the point of least camber.

 

However, if the corner is more banked later in the turn, the corner acts like an increasing radius and the lean limit is only imposed by the lower camber near the entry.

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Camber is "banking" on the track. Camber can be positive or negative. Or both if the road is crowned (high in the middle) or troughed (low in the middle). So, the least amount of camber is the least amount of banking. The road surface can "fall away" from your line or the apex and this is called negative camber.

 

If the corner is banked early and it goes away, it is the same as a decreasing radius and the point where least camber occurs is your limit for the corner, ie. if you hold a consistent line, that is the point where your max lean will occur by default as the road will be leaning up to meet your inside knee. If the corner is banked early and you are at max lean, you will need to lift up when you get to the point of least camber.

 

However, if the corner is more banked later in the turn, the corner acts like an increasing radius and the lean limit is only imposed by the lower camber near the entry.

 

Your reply makes sense. I took some time today to drive the course several times in my car and I learned a few things that I think will help. Thanks for the words about banking acting as a decreasing radius, makes sense.

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If the camber decreases the the end, couldn't you change your apex and use throttle control to have the bike already coming up instead of picking it up?

When the weather improves I'm going to try a new line. I think that will solve many of the problems. Shame it's only 44deg F today.

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If the camber decreases the the end, couldn't you change your apex and use throttle control to have the bike already coming up instead of picking it up?

 

Yes. Absolutely. That's the whole point. To choose your line and lean angle to follow standard throttle and steering. As the point of least camber is your point of greatest potential lean angle, you would choose a line/lean angle that allows you to not need to make mid-corner adjustments for the change in camber. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

 

So, if it happpens that the point of least camber is right at the exit, then, like any other corner, you would want to be oriented so as to be able to exit with the best drive possible, ie. "coming up" for the exit.

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