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Hi,

 

This might be a bit of a silly question. :blink:

I've been riding on the street for years, and a couple years ago, riding the twisties I ended up behind a couple trucks that (for safety reasons) I did not pass...

 

After passing them I started feeling a bit funny, then in a couple minutes I was dizzy, so I pulled over and got off the bike, completely dizzy and nauseated. :o I don't think it was the fumes from the trucks, more like a near object moving in front while waiving in the curves.

 

I had this problem before but I was either in a boat, or on a rough airplane flight.

So I'm a bit concerned, not much, about this happenning in the middle of a ride session and having to stop (it would really suck)... And I'm not sure if dramamine or other meds are recommended...

 

Go ahead, laugh, but also share any comments... :lol: Thanks

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Hi,

 

This might be a bit of a silly question. :blink:

I've been riding on the street for years, and a couple years ago, riding the twisties I ended up behind a couple trucks that (for safety reasons) I did not pass...

 

After passing them I started feeling a bit funny, then in a couple minutes I was dizzy, so I pulled over and got off the bike, completely dizzy and nauseated. :o I don't think it was the fumes from the trucks, more like a near object moving in front while waiving in the curves.

 

I had this problem before but I was either in a boat, or on a rough airplane flight.

So I'm a bit concerned, not much, about this happenning in the middle of a ride session and having to stop (it would really suck)... And I'm not sure if dramamine or other meds are recommended...

 

Go ahead, laugh, but also share any comments... :lol: Thanks

 

Not laughing at all, that sounds pretty uncomfortable! Something to think about - I occasionally get motion sickness on boats or in cars or buses, and there are two things that make it happen - diesel fumes, and staring at something that is not moving the same way I am. So if I try to read a book , or play cards, on a bus or in a boat I get nauseous. If I am also in a place where I get some diesel fumes it happens much quicker and it's much worse. Diesel fumes alone will make me nauseous and dizzy even without any motion.

 

So I can see how the back of a truck taking up most of your field of vision AND poisoning you with fumes could make you feel lousy.

 

I can't imagine that would EVER happen to you on the track, because what you SEE will relate properly to what you expect to see, and the fumes from race fuel from other bikes smell pretty damn good, actually, if you ask me! :)

 

Definitely don't take any medicine. Please. It will impair your riding. I am confident you won't have any motion sickness problems. If you are new to track riding, you'll probably have some butterflies in your stomach - don't confuse that with motion sickness, I think EVERYBODY gets a little nerves the first few times out, it doesn't mean you are getting sick and it goes away once you get a few laps in. :)

 

Um, since we are talking about illnesses here, did anyone warn you yet that track riding is extremely addicting? It has side effects like extreme expenditures, shortness of time, malaise at work, and can cause radical rearrangement of your priorities...

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Um, since we are talking about illnesses here, did anyone warn you yet that track riding is extremely addicting? It has side effects like extreme expenditures, shortness of time, malaise at work, and can cause radical rearrangement of your priorities...

 

 

Now I"M laughing :lol: ... Thanks I also think it was the blocking of the field of view and the corresponding fumes...

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I can say this, I live in Florida and when I go to Deals Gap( The Dragon) in North Carolina up in the mountains I get dizzy from riding the road the first few runs. It is 318 turns in 11 miles up and down in the mountains and that kinda change really gets your head spinning at first. Some of my friends get it too, after a couple of runs though you body get use to it and your ready to go. I would have to say though it was probably the fumes from the trucks. Being a medic and listening to the order and how you said it came on it sounds like you sucked in fumes.

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I can say this, I live in Florida and when I go to Deals Gap( The Dragon) in North Carolina up in the mountains I get dizzy from riding the road the first few runs. It is 318 turns in 11 miles up and down in the mountains and that kinda change really gets your head spinning at first. Some of my friends get it too, after a couple of runs thought you body get use to it and your ready to go. I would have to say though it was probably the fumes from the trucks. Being a medic and listening to the order and how you said it came on it sounds like you sucked in fumes.

 

Some one had this really obnoxious fumey stuff at the track a while back--smelled like laundry detergent or something. I'd heard you can get stuff and add to the fuel, but it was awful.

 

Not quite the same, I know.

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I can say this, I live in Florida and when I go to Deals Gap( The Dragon) in North Carolina up in the mountains I get dizzy from riding the road the first few runs. It is 318 turns in 11 miles up and down in the mountains and that kinda change really gets your head spinning at first. Some of my friends get it too, after a couple of runs thought you body get use to it and your ready to go. I would have to say though it was probably the fumes from the trucks. Being a medic and listening to the order and how you said it came on it sounds like you sucked in fumes.

 

Some one had this really obnoxious fumey stuff at the track a while back--smelled like laundry detergent or something. I'd heard you can get stuff and add to the fuel, but it was awful.

 

Not quite the same, I know.

 

 

 

 

Actually it is a lot closer to it then one might think Cobie. A lot of peoples senses get effected in bad ways just from smells alone. Even to the extreme of severe allergic reactions requiring immediate medical attention to stay alive. So for a smell to make one get loopie is not to far off. Unfortunately for me my job requires me to be around truly funky and nasty smells so I have built up an iron nose for it. lol But I still have my limits with some smells like everyone else. lol

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Actually it is a lot closer to it then one might think Cobie. A lot of peoples senses get effected in bad ways just from smells alone. Even to the extreme of severe allergic reactions requiring immediate medical attention to stay alive. So for a smell to make one get loopie is not to far off. Unfortunately for me my job requires me to be around truly funky and nasty smells so I have built up an iron nose for it. lol But I still have my limits with some smells like everyone else. lol

 

There are some airport fragrance counters that are really strong, can't handle it.

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So Chris,

 

Did you feel motion sick on the Dragon when we were barreling up and down the thing throughout the days or was it when we did our night runs in the pitch black. I'll still never know how you were able to spot your way through those turns while your headlamp was doing nothing but lighting the wall of rock along the road. All I know is that I am glad that I had your tail light to spot while we were leaned over pushing through all that.

 

Best regards,

-scott

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So Chris,

 

Did you feel motion sick on the Dragon when we were barreling up and down the thing throughout the days or was it when we did our night runs in the pitch black. I'll still never know how you were able to spot your way through those turns while your headlamp was doing nothing but lighting the wall of rock along the road. All I know is that I am glad that I had your tail light to spot while we were leaned over pushing through all that.

 

Best regards,

-scott

 

It was during the first few runs when we first got there. The night runs for me are the most fun. I think my night vision is stronger then most because of my job. It is pitch black inside a burning house and you learn to use very small subtle differences in the darkness to find your way around. After 10 years of this I think it has made me comfortable trusting my vision in the dark, as you saw following me. hehe

 

Chris

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