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When I first started getting serious about track riding, I kept a small log, probably not very beneficial, but better than nothing. I've since stopped altogether. I'm going to do a new track Sunday, and am going back to it. My question is: how many of you keep a log of your riding and sessions? Do you just follow the TOTW examples, or do you have your own system? Is this something that is taught at the school?

And another question is regarding "products." Do you start at the end, like TOTW suggests, or do most adjust from the beginning from the corner, or just where you are having problems? I always adjust during cornering. But at the same time, I haven't really improved much in the last year.

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Although a few have read this, and none have replied, I will still update as to the outcome of my work during the trackday. My notebook is sweat-filled, but turned out to be very effective.

I came off the track, and charted RP's I was picking up (as initially I was all over the place, I got lots from the outside of corners), and was able to adjust my lines without difficulty. The RP's are there, and since I was trying to remember them to put them in my book, they're better embedded in my brain and I have more because I was looking for them all over so that I could place them. The mental picture of the track was clear, and even brake points were plotted out. It was a brand new track for me, and was very easy to learn, although it was tricky. I don't know that it would have been so easy without my picture references.

I watched the line of a rider on a video a few days before going out, and it gave me an idea of the track. I have read that it's not very helpful, but I really do think it is. I didn't take the lines that the rider on the video did, but knowing roughly what I was getting into with solid objects on the track was great. It was probably a superstreet rider on a Hayabusa by watching him ride, and the BP and lines of the riders around him.

I didn't monitor my times, but do know that I progressed through the day. There were a couple sections where even the advanced riders couldn't pull away from me.

If there is anyone who doesn't draw out a track and write down RP's, even if you only do it your first time on a track, I would recommend it. Now with the notebook in hand I will definitely take it with me when I go back out to Firebird Main, and am planning on doing the same at East and West tracks.

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Although a few have read this, and none have replied, I will still update as to the outcome of my work during the trackday. My notebook is sweat-filled, but turned out to be very effective.

I came off the track, and charted RP's I was picking up (as initially I was all over the place, I got lots from the outside of corners), and was able to adjust my lines without difficulty. The RP's are there, and since I was trying to remember them to put them in my book, they're better embedded in my brain and I have more because I was looking for them all over so that I could place them. The mental picture of the track was clear, and even brake points were plotted out. It was a brand new track for me, and was very easy to learn, although it was tricky. I don't know that it would have been so easy without my picture references.

I watched the line of a rider on a video a few days before going out, and it gave me an idea of the track. I have read that it's not very helpful, but I really do think it is. I didn't take the lines that the rider on the video did, but knowing roughly what I was getting into with solid objects on the track was great. It was probably a superstreet rider on a Hayabusa by watching him ride, and the BP and lines of the riders around him.

I didn't monitor my times, but do know that I progressed through the day. There were a couple sections where even the advanced riders couldn't pull away from me.

If there is anyone who doesn't draw out a track and write down RP's, even if you only do it your first time on a track, I would recommend it. Now with the notebook in hand I will definitely take it with me when I go back out to Firebird Main, and am planning on doing the same at East and West tracks.

 

You should consider writing in your note pad which gear you are in and your rpm at your turn in point! With this information you can increase your entry speed by 100 rpm at a time, gradually until you really find the limit of your chosen line, or your tyres! even if you just try this at one corner, you will be surprised with the results!

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You should consider writing in your note pad which gear you are in and your rpm at your turn in point! With this information you can increase your entry speed by 100 rpm at a time, gradually until you really find the limit of your chosen line, or your tyres! even if you just try this at one corner, you will be surprised with the results!

I saw in TOTW that the example from the rider did have the gear, and I did that, but there are only downshift points on the track, then it 's on the straight, and up, up, up until it's time to brake. If I hit a track that requires more shifting it will come in handy, so I'll keep doing it for habit. I don't know how to gage rpm's without looking at the tach. Is it something I just need to learn to feel on the street, or (and I doubt this is the answer) am I supposed to look down when I'm shifting?

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I've been meaning to reply to this thread since you first posted it.

 

I've got notes on suspension settings for different tracks... and I have also just launched a website where I chronicle my riding sessions.

 

I don't have a riding dairy like yours Hubbard, but I might start one. For things like reference points, racing lines and laptimes, as well as notes on what areas of my riding need the most work.

 

I don't know how much graphing the data. Unless you have it set up automatically, it seems like a lot of manual work that could be better spent just reviewing your notes.

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