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Key To A Good Start?

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Since I started racing, my starts have been less than stellar, if not downright awful which often leaves me playing catch up through the race. Any tips for getting a good start would be appreciated. I'm going to try to get out for a drag race test and tune soon to see if i can improve. I'm on a ZX6R (636).

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There's this guy who races CCS who absolutely cracks the throttle and throws his body into the tank simultaneously. It's a spectacle to watch.

If you don't want to try that, you could just find a spot that's secluded (I used to practice at some loading docks behind a warehouse on Sundays) and practice. Learning the sound of the RPM's and working to keep them up during launch. Just doing it in first will get you better.

If you have someone to practice with, and/or someone to time you at a certain distance will be a good way to measure your success. Someone to flip the signs to signify a start will also benefit you. Redundance is the best teacher.

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Since I started racing, my starts have been less than stellar, if not downright awful which often leaves me playing catch up through the race. Any tips for getting a good start would be appreciated. I'm going to try to get out for a drag race test and tune soon to see if i can improve. I'm on a ZX6R (636).

 

Not dropping the throttle or blipping it is a good place to start.

 

What are you starts like, what do you do?

 

CF

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I used to bring the revs up to about 5000 rpm, at the drop of the flag, try to feed the clutch out progressively while adding throttle. Both feet were on the ground with my weight forward as much as possible. I would often end up in too much of a wheelie and have to get out of the gas. I have since changed to just trying to get a fast street start with no revs. I suspect my issues stem from how quickly I release the clutch. I have started keeping only my right foot on the ground with the left ready for my shift to second and trying to get my right back on the pegs asap.

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I used to bring the revs up to about 5000 rpm, at the drop of the flag, try to feed the clutch out progressively while adding throttle. Both feet were on the ground with my weight forward as much as possible. I would often end up in too much of a wheelie and have to get out of the gas. I have since changed to just trying to get a fast street start with no revs. I suspect my issues stem from how quickly I release the clutch. I have started keeping only my right foot on the ground with the left ready for my shift to second and trying to get my right back on the pegs asap.

 

Ever think of visiting the local drag night?

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I used to bring the revs up to about 5000 rpm, at the drop of the flag, try to feed the clutch out progressively while adding throttle. Both feet were on the ground with my weight forward as much as possible. I would often end up in too much of a wheelie and have to get out of the gas. I have since changed to just trying to get a fast street start with no revs. I suspect my issues stem from how quickly I release the clutch. I have started keeping only my right foot on the ground with the left ready for my shift to second and trying to get my right back on the pegs asap.

You need to raise your RPM's. Slow your clutch release, and try to keep your RPM's up until you are topped out and need to shift. Going to the drag strip is the best place because you can learn from other riders and measure your progress, but it's understood that there aren't drag nights every week.

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.....and have a point in the sign turns (that's what we start from unless you have lights) when you get your RPM's up before the start. When the light goes off, you're ready to go.

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i had hoped to get out for drag race day before our next race weekend, but that won't happen due to scheduling conflicts. Thanks for the advice though, is there a specific rev range most people on 600's start from?

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i had hoped to get out for drag race day before our next race weekend, but that won't happen due to scheduling conflicts. Thanks for the advice though, is there a specific rev range most people on 600's start from?

I haven't done it in a really long time, but will practice it for a while Sunday when I go out. I think it's around 6-7,000 for our bikes, but I keep it in the powerband, so I stick it up to 9,000 and try to keep it there while accelerating.

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Some guys suggest both feet down to help with straight start, but getting the feet up early helps for sure.

 

10k on a 600 is what some of our guys do.

 

Cf

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Some guys suggest both feet down to help with straight start, but getting the feet up early helps for sure.

 

10k on a 600 is what some of our guys do.

 

Cf

It lessens worrying about balance changes. That's a lot more weight to shift if you have to shift your pelvis and adjust the arch your back while trying to keep weight over the tank. Keeping the left foot up just means you have to pick up your right foot and you can be on your way. The weight is over the tank already, and it lessens the adjustment to be made.

While I was working on this and taking off with both feet down, I would have one foot up before the other anyway. Keeping one up before the start just made more sense. I used to keep my right foot up. Go figure. Still working on correcting it to this day.

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I race a 10. I set my RPM to 5k for starts. If I go more than that I burn out the clutch in a weekend. If I start from idle, the bike tends to bog when you give it full throttle.

 

So my process went like this. First I started from the max torque of the bike, 9k. That burned out clutches. Then I started from idle. That bogged. Then 3k - not quick enough. Now 5-6k is where I start from.

 

Just prior to the green flag, I bring the RPMs up and hold them there. Front brake on, letting out the clutch just enough to feel it. At the green flag, it's full throttle, release the front brake and a quick but controlled release of the clutch. Ideally to a small wheelie, 3-6 inches off the ground.

 

As for wheelies, getting your upper body forward and low is a great idea but it doesn't do much until your feet are on the pegs. If your feet are off the pegs, all of your weight is on the seat as far as the bike is concerned. That means a high center of mass which makes for easier wheelies. Getting weight onto the pegs lowers the center of mass and will reduce the tendency to wheelie.

 

If you could somehow start from underneath your bike, that'd be the bomb! <_<

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If you go to the top of the page, click on UK School Homepage! At the bottom right there is a link to rossi's top 10 riding tips video, on there one of his tips is standing starts on an R6, that may help you!

I posted a link to the video on here before but cant find it now!

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If you could somehow start from underneath your bike, that'd be the bomb! <_<

 

You can get "Mr. Recovery" Colin Edwards to show us how to do that :rolleyes:

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If you go to the top of the page, click on UK School Homepage! At the bottom right there is a link to rossi's top 10 riding tips video, on there one of his tips is standing starts on an R6, that may help you!

I posted a link to the video on here before but cant find it now!

 

Ace--I had a quick look didn't see it. If you do find it, please stick it up here.

 

Best,

CF

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LINK TO ROSSI VID

 

You have to sign up to see it.

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I race a 10. I set my RPM to 5k for starts. If I go more than that I burn out the clutch in a weekend. If I start from idle, the bike tends to bog when you give it full throttle.

 

As for wheelies, getting your upper body forward and low is a great idea but it doesn't do much until your feet are on the pegs. If your feet are off the pegs, all of your weight is on the seat as far as the bike is concerned. That means a high center of mass which makes for easier wheelies. Getting weight onto the pegs lowers the center of mass and will reduce the tendency to wheelie.

 

Maybe burning out the clutch is why other 600 riders start at 7 instead of 9 grand.

 

How do you position your feet from a start? Sounds like you would prefer keeping at least one foot a peg?

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I race a 10. I set my RPM to 5k for starts. If I go more than that I burn out the clutch in a weekend. If I start from idle, the bike tends to bog when you give it full throttle.

 

As for wheelies, getting your upper body forward and low is a great idea but it doesn't do much until your feet are on the pegs. If your feet are off the pegs, all of your weight is on the seat as far as the bike is concerned. That means a high center of mass which makes for easier wheelies. Getting weight onto the pegs lowers the center of mass and will reduce the tendency to wheelie.

 

Maybe burning out the clutch is why other 600 riders start at 7 instead of 9 grand.

 

How do you position your feet from a start? Sounds like you would prefer keeping at least one foot a peg?

 

Yeah, I like to keep one foot on a peg. I prefer to keep the right one up on the peg to stay anchored. The left foot is going to be moving anyway to shift so having it be the down foot makes sense to me.

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I race in a class where i'm the only Amateur, the others are Pros. when everything is right....which it has been lately....i'll pull 5 -6 lengths on them. So, I'm on an '07 R6. Hold the rpm at 10,000 ..right on the ground...over the tank..btw i weigh 230....and ABUSE the clutch...feed it out and dont let the rpm drop....depending on gearing....short shift if necessary...my 2 cents

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Clutches are consumables ;) how many times have you heard about Superbike riders not having enough clutch left for a second start, or burning it at the start. Expensive this race game eh!

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When i start a race i try to make sure i do it in one fluid motion, that is, i don't want to be fanning the clutch after the bike moves off the line. First up i engage the bike into 1st gear, then i allow the clutch out to the point where its starting to pull (obviously not enough to make the bike move), when the red lights go out i pick up the revs and SLOWLY let the clutch out, i would rather lose a fraction of a second making sure the bike engages properly rather than waste precious time ''fanning'' the clutch after i have already begun moving. This method has worked very well for me over the years, and almost always get the hole-shot. Hope you can use this advice to your advantage.

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