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How About A Newbie


mha
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Question for instructors:

Do you or would you take on a total newbie? In other words a person who has absolutely no experience on motorcycles and is only just starting to ride. See forum under Kook. Reason I ask is that being a new rider it would be good to learn good techniques and not pickup bad habits or stupid ideas from other common street riders. What a better place to learn and become proficient then under experienced and proven race instructors.

Good Idea?

Muhaha

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Question for instructors:

Do you or would you take on a total newbie? In other words a person who has absolutely no experience on motorcycles and is only just starting to ride. See forum under Kook. Reason I ask is that being a new rider it would be good to learn good techniques and not pickup bad habits or stupid ideas from other common street riders. What a better place to learn and become proficient then under experienced and proven race instructors.

Good Idea?

Muhaha

 

Hi Muhaha and welcome to the forum :)

 

I'm no instructor, but from what I've read on the sign up page, the SBK school require that "Students must have some riding experience -- we do not train first time riders." You'll have to clarify what "some" means, but probably doing the rider safety foundation course would be a good start. I believe that's the equivalent of getting your road license. At least then you'd know the basic controls and functions. After you learn the basics would be a perfect time to get into GOOD habits in the school so they can catch any bad habits early and help you to become a great rider. Good luck and hope to see you out there sometime :)

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Question for instructors:

Do you or would you take on a total newbie? In other words a person who has absolutely no experience on motorcycles and is only just starting to ride. See forum under Kook. Reason I ask is that being a new rider it would be good to learn good techniques and not pickup bad habits or stupid ideas from other common street riders. What a better place to learn and become proficient then under experienced and proven race instructors.

Good Idea?

Muhaha

 

No, we don't take total newbies. You need to be able to concentrate on the drill that you're working on out in the track without being totally engrossed in figuring out what control to use.

 

Making an analogy with your study in martail arts, it'd be like taking a newbie fresh off the street, teaching them 10 or more moves and then sparring with them. They'd just be reacting with no real idea of what they were doing, when or why.

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The only thing I'd say that the other posters didn't get into is how I'd go about this.

1) get your bike and take a BASIC safety course they are not going to teach you much about riding but it will probably be more knowledge than you started with, and that's a good thing.

 

2) get Keith's book "A Twist of the Wrist 2" and start to read it as you enjoy riding your new bike!

 

3) after you feel like you know where all the controls are on your bike without having to think about it much, you should find some nice twisty roads and ride them AT OR UNDER THE SPEED LIMIT. I can tell you that when I started riding I did not feel comfortable riding as fast as the law permitted in my local canyons. Only go as fast as you feel safe, keeping in mind that there may be obstacles you are not aware of around a bend in the road.

 

4) eventually (probably quite quickly!) you will feel comfortable going the speed limit, even in the twisties, and you will be tempted to go above it. Don't do it. That's what the track is for (yay!), so at this point you can either book yourself a track day or sign up for the Superbike School. Although I went the track day route, I think the CSS route is better. I have found that most track organisations are not running a very tight ship, certainly not compared to the incredible professionalism of the CSS. You will benefit from being able to experience the track through the control and intelligence of the CSS staff.

 

Well, that's my two cents worth of advice anyway!

 

Welcome to the forum and make sure that you have FUN! Sometimes you have to push aside other peoples comments, feelings, and bad advice and remember look at all the good parts of life (or motorcycle riding!) to do that.

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4) eventually (probably quite quickly!) you will feel comfortable going the speed limit, even in the twisties, and you will be tempted to go above it. Don't do it.

 

This is some of the best advice you'll ever get.

 

Start with A Twist Of The Wrist before you get the second book. I'd suggest finding a big parking lot on a Sunday morning, and doing a couple hours of practice drills and investigating what you've learned. If you lived in Arizona, I'd offer to help. Learn about leaning, countersteering, looking into the corner, etc. Watch racing, and put together what is going on compared to what is in the book. You'll learn a lot. Really. Apexing, accelerating, body position, it will all help. You'll see the best riders in the world putting into practice a lot of what you'll read in the books.

 

Keep in mind to give a little time to practicing what you've learned in MSF. Those are the basics of what will help you on the street. It will change some as you progress (rear brake? Psh) but the very basics will stay the same. I have drills for my wife that I can give you. They're nothing like you'll learn from the school, but they'll help a little.

 

Even the dumbest question will be answered and broken down on this site. The people on here who post have your best interest in mind. Read some of my older posts for example (under hubbard_28), and you'll read some pretty dumb stuff. I've learned so much on this site. You will NEVER get too advanced to come onto this site and ask questions, that much I'll guarantee. Someone will know the answer to any question you'll have.

 

You've entered the world that is both fantastic and dangerous at the same time. Pay attention to the basics. Learn how to do it right, and you'll have the time of your life. Do it wrong and you're almost guaranteed to pay a hefty price.

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Just get both books, LOL. For me TOTW2 was easier but I have really heard it both ways. I don't know where you live but if you're near AZ I'd take Jasonzilla up on his offer to ride with you a bit, either way I'd check out the drills he gave his wife... actually Jason if you could PM me I'd like to check them out for my wife! As soon as she's had a bit of experience I want to go to CSS with her. I just did levels 1 and 2 and I already want to do them again, LOL. I'll send you a PM.

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Question for instructors:

Do you or would you take on a total newbie? In other words a person who has absolutely no experience on motorcycles and is only just starting to ride. See forum under Kook. Reason I ask is that being a new rider it would be good to learn good techniques and not pickup bad habits or stupid ideas from other common street riders. What a better place to learn and become proficient then under experienced and proven race instructors.

Good Idea?

Muhaha

 

HI Muhaha (great forum name),

 

We don't yet have a newbie program, but who knows what the future might bring!

 

You have already gotten some solid advice. The Twist books are the ones, last time I asked Keith he suggested a person start with Twist 1. Practicing in a easy/less busy/less crowded place, until you get more comfortable would be good overall idea. When I trained my wife, she did the MSF (good as it had small bikes, but seems to depend a little on how good the coach/coaches are). Then we went to a parking lot (I rode the bike there) and practiced the very basic actions with her--like, letting out the clutch, etc.

 

Then we went and did the least crowded side streets we could find, she followed me. Did that a bit, then got her on the freeway and to the curvy roads asap. She was never a huge fan of city traffic, but became an excellent rider. Of course, had her at the school a few times too.

 

Let us know what you do!

 

Best,

Cobie

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Thanks Cobbie and the rest I'm going to pickup those two books! And yes I'm going to work at it for the next 6 months and try and get experienced in my skills and I WILL GO TO YOUR SCHOOL! sometime next year (work permiting)

And I'd take you guys up on your offer to teach me to ride but alas I'm not in Arizona, I'm about 3,500 miles away in Hawaii, that's where the surfing and freediving come into play. We don't have really any open country or wide spaces but I'm looking for a training school to improve rider skills here. I am inspired!

Thanks,

Muhaha

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