Jump to content
JTNYC

Thunderbolt Here I Come! Bike Question

Recommended Posts

Hey guys,

 

I had been trying to get a group of us Triumph riders to sign up, but everyone's been taking their sweet time deciding while there weren't too many spots left. I've been wanting to do take the class for a long time now, so I signed myself up today to make sure I got a spot!

 

A few questions:

1) I'm signed up for 3 single days: Level I on May 10, Level II on May 11, and Level III on May 14. Do you guys think that's too much in too little time to really maximize the experience? I'm a long time street rider, but have never been on the track.

 

2) I've signed up to use my own bike mainly because of the costs. I have a 2008 Triumph Street Triple, and I know there are people who use it on the track... but it's got a handle bar and is designed to be ridden in an upright position. I'm replacing the rear shock with one from the Daytona 675 (the sister, sport model) this winter, but the stock front forks weren't really intended for the track and have no adjustability. On the one hand, I think using my bike would really allow me to gain more confidence on it. But on the other hand, I'm not sure if I'll be missing out not learning on a real sportbike? Also, how much wear and tear would I be putting on my bike?

 

3) Anyone else going from the Tri-state area?

 

Looks like I've got lots of studying to do this winter! I really can't wait for the class!!!

 

Cheers,

JT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi JT,

 

3 days in a row can be too much (some hard core guys do 4!), but if you can put a few days in between, that should be fine.

 

There are pluses and minus of riding your bike or ours.

 

The training is the same, and will apply to any bike. With ours, it will be set up and handle well, you know the tires will be in good shape, and you will be on the same bike as your coach. This format has worked well, really takes any questions of bike/tire out of the equation. Also, tire wear is pretty severe on a track, you could save the cost of doing the school by tire wear.

 

A couple of other factors,related: some riders just never feel like they can cut loose on their bike and "worry" a bit about it while on track. With our bike, the most you would ever pay would be the damage deposit, and it doesn't usually go to the full amount. Parts are at a discount, and there is no labor cost.

 

When I have asked, students usually say they are used to our bikes in 1-2 sessions.

 

The plus of ridng your bike is you know it, and we can also often help you with pointers on it: tires, suspension, etc.

 

Many do a cocktail: ride our bike 1-2 days, then ride your own.

 

Let us know if any other questions, or call the office any time.

 

Best,

Cobie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys,

 

I had been trying to get a group of us Triumph riders to sign up, but everyone's been taking their sweet time deciding while there weren't too many spots left. I've been wanting to do take the class for a long time now, so I signed myself up today to make sure I got a spot!

 

A few questions:

1) I'm signed up for 3 single days: Level I on May 10, Level II on May 11, and Level III on May 14. Do you guys think that's too much in too little time to really maximize the experience? I'm a long time street rider, but have never been on the track.

 

2) I've signed up to use my own bike mainly because of the costs. I have a 2008 Triumph Street Triple, and I know there are people who use it on the track... but it's got a handle bar and is designed to be ridden in an upright position. I'm replacing the rear shock with one from the Daytona 675 (the sister, sport model) this winter, but the stock front forks weren't really intended for the track and have no adjustability. On the one hand, I think using my bike would really allow me to gain more confidence on it. But on the other hand, I'm not sure if I'll be missing out not learning on a real sportbike? Also, how much wear and tear would I be putting on my bike?

 

3) Anyone else going from the Tri-state area?

 

Looks like I've got lots of studying to do this winter! I really can't wait for the class!!!

 

 

 

Cheers,

JT

Hi JT,

I have signed up to use school bike also because of cost too--even with over $1250 deposit and this is my 4th time in coming March in Sears Point. Considering one crash (though it has not happened yet) may cost more with own bike.

In addition, saving tire cost and preparing the coolant etc plus the chance to ride the new BMW, seems worths it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys,

 

I had been trying to get a group of us Triumph riders to sign up, but everyone's been taking their sweet time deciding while there weren't too many spots left. I've been wanting to do take the class for a long time now, so I signed myself up today to make sure I got a spot!

 

A few questions:

1) I'm signed up for 3 single days: Level I on May 10, Level II on May 11, and Level III on May 14. Do you guys think that's too much in too little time to really maximize the experience? I'm a long time street rider, but have never been on the track.

 

2) I've signed up to use my own bike mainly because of the costs. I have a 2008 Triumph Street Triple, and I know there are people who use it on the track... but it's got a handle bar and is designed to be ridden in an upright position. I'm replacing the rear shock with one from the Daytona 675 (the sister, sport model) this winter, but the stock front forks weren't really intended for the track and have no adjustability. On the one hand, I think using my bike would really allow me to gain more confidence on it. But on the other hand, I'm not sure if I'll be missing out not learning on a real sportbike? Also, how much wear and tear would I be putting on my bike?

 

3) Anyone else going from the Tri-state area?

 

Looks like I've got lots of studying to do this winter! I really can't wait for the class!!!

 

Cheers,

JT

 

JT,

 

just done level 3 on my 2006 speed triple. My thoughts are that you could do level 1 and 2 on your bike, as there is not a great deal of hanging off the bike. I mean, this is the bike you'll be riding for a while presumably? I don't think you'll miss suspension adjustment too much on level 1 and 2, you'll be concentrating on other issues.

 

Level3 - up to you. I'm 6'6" tall and 240lbs, I've had my suspension uprated and it has a fully adjustable front end on it. If you're comfortable with your bike, be happy and use it for level 3. I have a few issues locking on to the bike due to LLS (long leg syndrome) but I'm working on it (locking on that is - I think the LLS is permanent - at least I hope it is!). Suspension adjustments can lead you astray, they shouldn't be the focus...throttling on can cure most of an evil handling bike's ills.

 

In TOTW2 it is mentioned that John Kocinski won a championship one season with no suspension adjustments to his bike between tracks. It was all about his throttle control making the bike stable, albeit from a pretty good initial set up.

 

So that's my two-bob worth. 1 and 2 on your bike, 3 if you want, if you fit the bike real good, don't blame the suspension, use the throttle to keep it in the sweet spot.

 

Happy Festivus

 

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey JT,

 

 

It really comes down to what you prefer. A cocktail would be nice because you'll also have the chance to ride another bike, but I do understand the cost savings. I'm in the tri-state area and will be attending Level's 1 & 2 on May 10th and 11th. There are 3 of us going those two days and we're probably going to ride down. My buddies are going to ride the school's bike and I'm riding mine, I'm just going to switch out the fairings to race fairings. Let me know what you decide and maybe set something up to save on hotel costs.

 

 

Harry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice, everyone!

 

Cobie:

The way the schedule worked out, I'll have 2 days off between Levels II and III (while the school hosts a 2-day camp) at Thunderbolt. I'm hoping that it would give me enough time to rest up, while giving me an opportunity to come back and ask all the questions that may come up after the first 2 days.

I can totally see how I may worry too much and not push as hard as I could on my bike... How likely (or often) have students crashed? Has there been more crashes on the school's bike vs their own?

 

It was actually 50 here in NYC yesterday (Sun) and I went out for a nice ride. I've been reading TOTWII and had just watched the TOTWII DVD, so I experimented with some of the things that were covered in the DVD. I also tried to lean forward in a more sportbike-like position, but the geometry of the handle bar (being so high) makes it a little awkward (I feel like I'm "crawling" on my bike with my arms folded) and doesn't really allow my body to lean against the tank. From what dbtriple said, this seems to be more of an issue in Level III which covers body positioning, right?

 

ps, I'm really looking forward to meeting you in person.

 

dbtripple:

Thanks a lot for the info.

 

Did you do levels I and II on your bike or the school's? What is the long leg syndrome? I imagine it must be a lot easier for tall people to drag their knees due to the length of their legs?

 

Also, on the track, did you ride in the "normal" upright position or the tucked-in position?

 

I'm 5'8" and about 170lbs. I'm very comfortable on my Street Triple, but it seems like my legs are slightly too short for most sportbikes... I usually need to tip toe a little to reach the ground.

 

Yea, I really love my Street Triple and plan on riding it for at least a few years. I think I will follow your suggestion and do Levels I and II on my bike, and then III on the school's bike since it seems like I may benefit more that way (also to have something to look forward to the first 2 days).

 

Harry-nyc:

I'm also taking levels I and II on May 10th and 11th, and then I'll be back to take Level III and the 14th. It would be cool if we can all ride down together. I would definitely be interested in setting something up for hotel, too! You can reach me at messagejeff@gmail.com

 

ps, any chance you would be interested in taking Level III on Friday, too?
;)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbtripple:

Thanks a lot for the info.

 

Did you do levels I and II on your bike or the school's? What is the long leg syndrome? I imagine it must be a lot easier for tall people to drag their knees due to the length of their legs?

 

I can't speak for dbtripple's version of "Long Leg Syndrome", but since I'm 6'6" as well, I can at least add my own perspective: when you have (very) long legs, you tend to have very sharp angles in the lower joints (knee, ankle) and the bike dimensions can make it difficult finding a good, stable body position on the bike. All this can also make it a bit awkward moving around on the bike and cause fatigue on longer drives.

 

WRT your own vs a school bike: I've done all my levels (1-4) on my own bikes. Yes, you may be a little bit more cautious about dropping the bike, but I think that's just a good thing since charging around the track will most likely lower your learning during the day(s).

 

Hope this helps,

 

Kai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbtripple:

Thanks a lot for the info.

 

Did you do levels I and II on your bike or the school's? What is the long leg syndrome? I imagine it must be a lot easier for tall people to drag their knees due to the length of their legs?

 

Also, on the track, did you ride in the "normal" upright position or the tucked-in position?

 

I'm 5'8" and about 170lbs. I'm very comfortable on my Street Triple, but it seems like my legs are slightly too short for most sportbikes... I usually need to tip toe a little to reach the ground.

 

Yea, I really love my Street Triple and plan on riding it for at least a few years. I think I will follow your suggestion and do Levels I and II on my bike, and then III on the school's bike since it seems like I may benefit more that way (also to have something to look forward to the first 2 days).

Dear JTNYC,

 

I have done all levels on my own bike. After all its the one I'll be riding!

 

Just being silly about having long legs (LLS). Level one and 2 I did in the "normal" position, starting a bit of body leaning in level 2. Level 3 has shown the importance of using the body position more fully. In fact level one and two would have been better this way too, but it wasn't happening for me!

 

Regarding getting the knee down...I was disappointed it didn't occur for me at level 3 but it's not the end of the world. It will come if I get a better lock on to the tank - the photos from the track day showed me I still have some work to do. I've seen plenty of photos of blokes with the knee down since I did level 3, and good on them, they've got the knee down - but they're all crossed up and the bike is leaning way too far, which is the reverse of what you want....its about standing the bike up to the fatter part of the tyre, to get better drive out. If it happens for me some day, it will be for the right reasons, not just for its own sake. I think the length of the legs is irrelevant, it puts the knee further into the air as well as further out, the angle of the leg is probably more critical than the length.

 

I am aware however that I may just be a pussy who is afraid of leaning it far enough!

 

cheers mate and go the mighty Triumphs. Actually, I was watching some Aussie BEARS racing the other night and one of the commentators said of Triumphs "they're like HArleys, you either love them or you hate them"! Well what a load of rubbish that is, they're nothing like harleys, they stop, go and handle for a start, and you don't need to be pretend to be hard as nails to own one either! I should complain to the biking gods I suppose, but you'll have to do.

 

cheers

 

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dbtripple:

Thanks a lot for the info.

 

Did you do levels I and II on your bike or the school's? What is the long leg syndrome? I imagine it must be a lot easier for tall people to drag their knees due to the length of their legs?

 

I can't speak for dbtripple's version of "Long Leg Syndrome", but since I'm 6'6" as well, I can at least add my own perspective: when you have (very) long legs, you tend to have very sharp angles in the lower joints (knee, ankle) and the bike dimensions can make it difficult finding a good, stable body position on the bike. All this can also make it a bit awkward moving around on the bike and cause fatigue on longer drives.

 

WRT your own vs a school bike: I've done all my levels (1-4) on my own bikes. Yes, you may be a little bit more cautious about dropping the bike, but I think that's just a good thing since charging around the track will most likely lower your learning during the day(s).

 

Hope this helps,

 

Kai

 

Kai mate,

 

I can certainly relate to what you are saying regarding cramping up of the joints. Long rides, such as the 1000km trip to see the Motogp at Phillip Island can leave me somewaht crippled after a stint, and that is on the luxurious (by comparison to "real" sportsbikes) Speed triple.

Moving around on the bike......wasn't so bad. I mean I was fairly well prepared, but was sore for 3 days after, I'll try again next year at a track day after more thorough preparation and see. Ideally I'd like to try a proper sportsbike someday, but for now the dollars just aren't there.

 

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kai mate,

 

I can certainly relate to what you are saying regarding cramping up of the joints. Long rides, such as the 1000km trip to see the Motogp at Phillip Island can leave me somewaht crippled after a stint, and that is on the luxurious (by comparison to "real" sportsbikes) Speed triple.

Moving around on the bike......wasn't so bad. I mean I was fairly well prepared, but was sore for 3 days after, I'll try again next year at a track day after more thorough preparation and see. Ideally I'd like to try a proper sportsbike someday, but for now the dollars just aren't there.

 

db

 

Don't do it, you might get hooked :), then you'd have to get another bike (or trade in).

 

Actually, for guys shorter than you two gents (most of us I would think), sportbikes aren't that comfortable for long rides either. But, I don't tour on a bike, so riding at the track it is the "right" position. I had one coach that was 6'7" 330 lbs (yeah, a big boy). He didn't whine too much.

 

Best,

CF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys,

 

I had been trying to get a group of us Triumph riders to sign up, but everyone's been taking their sweet time deciding while there weren't too many spots left. I've been wanting to do take the class for a long time now, so I signed myself up today to make sure I got a spot!

 

A few questions:

1) I'm signed up for 3 single days: Level I on May 10, Level II on May 11, and Level III on May 14. Do you guys think that's too much in too little time to really maximize the experience? I'm a long time street rider, but have never been on the track.

 

2) I've signed up to use my own bike mainly because of the costs. I have a 2008 Triumph Street Triple, and I know there are people who use it on the track... but it's got a handle bar and is designed to be ridden in an upright position. I'm replacing the rear shock with one from the Daytona 675 (the sister, sport model) this winter, but the stock front forks weren't really intended for the track and have no adjustability. On the one hand, I think using my bike would really allow me to gain more confidence on it. But on the other hand, I'm not sure if I'll be missing out not learning on a real sportbike? Also, how much wear and tear would I be putting on my bike?

 

3) Anyone else going from the Tri-state area?

 

Looks like I've got lots of studying to do this winter! I really can't wait for the class!!!

 

Cheers,

JT

 

I am from Albany. Doing back to back track days are very common, so I believe you should be fine. If you are already in a routine doing exercises keeping the physical and stamina up, you should not have a problem at all. Otherwise it is never too late to start.

 

I am doing a 2 day at NJMP in May, if you have the means consider doing the 2 day camp and get to ride the S1000RR at the same time.... ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am from Albany. Doing back to back track days are very common, so I believe you should be fine. If you are already in a routine doing exercises keeping the physical and stamina up, you should not have a problem at all. Otherwise it is never too late to start.

 

I am doing a 2 day at NJMP in May, if you have the means consider doing the 2 day camp and get to ride the S1000RR at the same time.... ^_^

 

Rocket,

 

Well, you answered my other questions, and are already signed up, so we'll see you there. That S1000 is going to be a hoot to ride at that track, big fun :)

 

CF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry I'm late to the thread. Anything that reads Thunderbolt and I'm typically on it like a hound.

 

JT, you made a great choice in venue and attending the school. For me, I was eager to try the school bikes during my first camp. At the time the school was using the ZX-6R and I hadn't ridden a Kawasaki in nearly 15 years. In your instance, you will have the opportunity to ride one of the most anticipated motorcycles launched in recent memory with the new BMW.

 

You can't make a bad choice after making two really good ones. Let us know what you decided and be sure to say hello. I look forward to meeting you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey Jody,

 

Are you signed up for those 3 days, too? It would be great to meet you, too. Not sure how to find you, but I'll be riding my black Triumph Street Triple down there so you can look for my bike (I doubt there will be too many there, if at all).

 

Now that I've got the bike more or less figured out, the next thing is gear. Not sure whether to buy a suit and boots or just rent...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure whether to buy a suit and boots or just rent...

...my 2 cents: BUY! You need this equipment anyway. But then it's easy to spend someone else's money.

Rainman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure whether to buy a suit and boots or just rent...

...my 2 cents: BUY! You need this equipment anyway. But then it's easy to spend someone else's money.

I agree with Kevin: Buy ... if you at all can find some leathers that suit you (no pun intended). If you cannot find leathers that fit you well, consider renting if you know you'll have a set made-to-measure (it ain't cheap). You should be able to pick up boots, gloves and back protector that fit you like the proverbial glove. If the first shop don't have stuff that fits you, visit other shops that carry other brands.

 

Oh, and remember those earplugs!

 

Cheers, Kai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For sure having your own gear that fits you well is important. A couple of things to consider though:

 

What are you going to do with us? What if a person gets a full 1 piece suit, and finds he does 98% of his riding commuting and doesn't use it? In that case maybe an Aerostich type suit might be better investment.

 

I personally like vented leather. Cold days put plastic on the inside, and jacket on the outside, and that's as good as I need---too coldl for that, I'm not going to ride.

 

Inner suits are really helpful. Again, I use a vented one warmer months, and under armour type gear in colder times.

 

Makes a huge difference on comfort, and getting in and out of the leathers--I make sure I have this gear with me all the time, it's so much more comfortable.

 

If you aren't use to full leathers, if you are coming out, you can try our gear on, whether you rent it or not. That's a good idea, find out what is out there. We have new boots and gloves (and back protector) sponsor now, Alpinestars, they have good gear.

 

CF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice, everyone.

 

Most of my riding is just casual but I do ride twisties every now and then (I plan to do more of it this year). I haven't done any track days yet, but I imagine that could change after the school in May. I'm open minded ;)

 

I found a pretty good deal on the local craigslist and bought an Alpinestars MX-1 suit. Apparently the seller gave up riding after a friend's tragic motorcycle accident and he actually never got to use the suit so it was basically brand new. Aside from the good price, it was the only suit out of the 5 that I've tried on at dealers that actually fit (or I could fit myself into) due to my massive legs.

 

The only thing that I'm not sure about it is that it's in all black.

 

Now the search continues to the boots and gloves. I'm thinking of getting a more casual pair for now to save money (rather than a full-blown racing pair since the only ones that would fit my tree trunk calves are the $$$$$$Sidis). What's the school requirement? And for gloves?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now the search continues to the boots and gloves. I'm thinking of getting a more casual pair for now to save money (rather than a full-blown racing pair since the only ones that would fit my tree trunk calves are the $$$Sidis). What's the school requirement? And for gloves?

 

Don't see it being specified on CCS's site, but gauntlet glove is generally the standard for schools and track days. You don't have to spend a lot on boots and gloves, or even the suit. I would also suggest a back protector if don't already have one.

 

How much did you pay for your used A*?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How much did you pay for your used A*?

 

I paid about $500. It's basically brand new w/o tags and this model comes with a back protector

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How much did you pay for your used A*?

 

I paid about $500. It's basically brand new w/o tags and this model comes with a back protector

 

Might consider getting a hard back protector, some clubs require one and certainly as you level up you will need one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How much did you pay for your used A*?

 

I paid about $500. It's basically brand new w/o tags and this model comes with a back protector

 

Might consider getting a hard back protector, some clubs require one and certainly as you level up you will need one.

 

It was like seat belts for me--never used one, till I was requried to, now feel naked w/out the belt (or back protector) on.

 

CF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...