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dmj120

Not Really 'success'

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I've been helping my friend to increase his confidence --via flicking, throttle control and opening the turns up with later less lazy turn-in :).

 

He has the twist2 book and we've watched my twist2 dvd. I'm really surprised how enjoyable it is to see someone improve and become more secure; plus, it has solidified a few things with me... hold a line whilst looking in the mirrors, better lines, better throttle control, better body positioning (did the 'turn here' drill, of sorts) and roll-on.

 

The techniques taught is beneficial on multiple levels. I couldn't believe how Josh was so smooth with one hand in the air and constantly looking back. Now, it seems pretty easy.

 

Anyway, thanks for the skills and techniques that allowed me to give a friend a little help. I'm hoping I can make a level 2 class this year.

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I've been helping my friend to increase his confidence --via flicking, throttle control and opening the turns up with later less lazy turn-in :).

 

He has the twist2 book and we've watched my twist2 dvd. I'm really surprised how enjoyable it is to see someone improve and become more secure; plus, it has solidified a few things with me... hold a line whilst looking in the mirrors, better lines, better throttle control, better body positioning (did the 'turn here' drill, of sorts) and roll-on.

 

The techniques taught is beneficial on multiple levels. I couldn't believe how Josh was so smooth with one hand in the air and constantly looking back. Now, it seems pretty easy.

 

Anyway, thanks for the skills and techniques that allowed me to give a friend a little help. I'm hoping I can make a level 2 class this year.

 

Great story! It is one that could be told by many of the coaches - helping someone and seeing the progress is most enjoyable.

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Having the right data, and getting it applied--rewarding for sure!

 

CF

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Honestly, there was a bit of skepticism about helping people and enjoying their successes... but I'll be damned, it be true.

 

Since I'm still learning, and probably not the best teacher, I've done everything short of beat him with the damn book to get his ass to level 1. Hopefully, though eventually, I'll convince him that someone not leaning themselves who is also an experienced instructor will get him from 'gaining confidence' to being confident. BUT I did get him to understand why and perform: Once cracked open .... slowly, continuously.... throughout the remainder of the turn. :D

 

I'm sure this idiot will get to level 1 in the next year or two... sooner the better -dumbass. :rolleyes:

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Here is something that I've studied a little: if people don't have some investment or some level of exchange for a service, they rarely listen very well.

 

I used to give all kinds of advice to my friends, and you know what--almost none of them came to the school! Another thing I have noticed is that while sometimes we have done private coaching (at a race, or another's track day) the results are just about never as good as on the days when we are there as a full team, and totally control the environment, and the riders wanted to be there, and had some exchange for it. Sometimes pointing out where a person is not as strong with his riding skills, making that clear to them (maybe by example), and then where they can get the correct information (school, book, DVD), that can work.

 

CF

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I was one. Give me advice and I'll improve. For some, this does work and they continue to improve, until the advice well runs dry.

Do you ever wonder what credentials the person giving you the advice has??

Are they creditable because they are faster?

Are they creditable because their leathers are clean?

Are they creditable because they are older?

Are they creditable because their bikes don't have a pavement induced paint scheme?

 

Like most, I had a few years of riding experience and figured "track days" were for really good riders. Kept doing my thing, having fun and wondering what else was out there, could I get better? No matter how much "better" I could get, never would I be good enough for a "tack day"

 

Fast-forward to May 2010 - CSS Two Day Camp @ VIR "why did I wait so long?!" It was a WONDERFUL experience. The worst part, it didn't start soon enough and stopped too early. Seriously, my anticipation level was high and the professional albeit laid back style of all the CSS Staff was OUTSTANDING. Guess you could say they know what they are doing and have been down the track once or twice.

 

Listen - practice - LISTEN - practice - LISTEN "understand" practice and magic will happen - you will get better. We might want to go faster and get better right now however, the CSS system; classroom, track and de-brief is a very sound application and works wonders. Remember the drills as you progess thru the day. When you improve on one drill and move to the next, you will be suprised at what is happening before you know it.

 

Get out of the parking lot and onto the paddock, leathers up and go. Before you go - do what you are doing - educate yourself from books and DVDs - that advice is worth the price. When you get there, become a sponge - soak it all up. Before you know it, you could be out there giving better advice than you've received.

 

Enjoy

 

 

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Fast-forward to May 2010 - CSS Two Day Camp @ VIR "why did I wait so long?!" It was a WONDERFUL experience. The worst part, it didn't start soon enough and stopped too early. Seriously, my anticipation level was high and the professional albeit laid back style of all the CSS Staff was OUTSTANDING. Guess you could say they know what they are doing and have been down the track once or twice.

 

Listen - practice - LISTEN - practice - LISTEN "understand" practice and magic will happen - you will get better. We might want to go faster and get better right now however, the CSS system; classroom, track and de-brief is a very sound application and works wonders. Remember the drills as you progess thru the day. When you improve on one drill and move to the next, you will be suprised at what is happening before you know it.

 

Get out of the parking lot and onto the paddock, leathers up and go. Before you go - do what you are doing - educate yourself from books and DVDs - that advice is worth the price. When you get there, become a sponge - soak it all up. Before you know it, you could be out there giving better advice than you've received.

 

Enjoy

 

First, let me say "yup!" the day starts too late and ends way to soon... but then again I've felt the same about every track day except 1 (a weekend thing). I HATE the last time out... I feel that little boy inside starting to through a fit when it's time to start packing up :(. But that is one of the reasons that I know how much I truly enjoy being out there -- for a track day for training.

 

Also, as Keith has said, there's a lot of advise out there ;) - my main objective was to get my friend to begin to understand what the book and dvd was saying, and to get him, at least, a little safer. Especially, when I was able to say "dude, you're doing ____; I know, 'cause I did it too. See the difference these couple things make?" Just the few things from the dvd about throttle control made such a difference in his riding, confidence and enjoyment that even though we went slow - so much so, that the ride was 4 times longer than I (a beginner/intermediate guy) would have ever taken. But at every stop, once his helmet came off and the Ora of 'yeah' that surrounded him made it one of the best rides. ---ok, rant done.

 

The techniques and crawl before you walk methodology works -- without you even realizing it. I think that is the part of the program that I like; not the do this, but the if you do this, it'll feel like that -- in other words, attacking the cause, not the symptom.

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