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Steering Transition!


Guest IgnativsElvis
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Guest IgnativsElvis

Firstly; this is still ?counter-steering? just with a slight twist.This transition works especially well when you need to steer the bike after hard braking (ie: a hairpin after a long straight).I use the pressure of my arms on the handlebars from braking, to pre-load the pressure I want to use to counter-steer for the corner (any excessive pressure to what I need is shifted to the legs).As I get to my turning point, I release the brake and I also release the pressure on the outside handlebar, which now leaves pressure only on the inside handlebar (counter-steering). So basically I don?t press the inside handlebar, I release the pressure on the outside handlebar to steer.Stand facing a table about 2 feet in distance, then lean and place your hands on the table about shoulder width apart. Allow your body weight to rest on both hands; it should feel a bit like braking. Now just release the pressure from one of the hands. You?ll notice that there is now twice as much pressure on the other hand.You can?t totally eliminate the pressure on the handlebars when you?re braking hard, so you might as well make use of it. Enjoy!

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Firstly; this is still ?counter-steering? just with a slight twist.This transition works especially well when you need to steer the bike after hard braking (ie: a hairpin after a long straight).I use the pressure of my arms on the handlebars from braking, to pre-load the pressure I want to use to counter-steer for the corner (any excessive pressure to what I need is shifted to the legs).As I get to my turning point, I release the brake and I also release the pressure on the outside handlebar, which now leaves pressure only on the inside handlebar (counter-steering). So basically I don?t press the inside handlebar, I release the pressure on the outside handlebar to steer.Stand facing a table about 2 feet in distance, then lean and place your hands on the table about shoulder width apart. Allow your body weight to rest on both hands; it should feel a bit like braking. Now just release the pressure from one of the hands. You?ll notice that there is now twice as much pressure on the other hand.You can?t totally eliminate the pressure on the handlebars when you?re braking hard, so you might as well make use of it. Enjoy!

 

 

 

you need to do level 1

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... Allow your body weight to rest on both hands; it should feel a bit like braking. Now just release the pressure from one of the hands. You?ll notice that there is now twice as much pressure on the other hand.You can?t totally eliminate the pressure on the handlebars when you?re braking hard, so you might as well make use of it. Enjoy!

 

Well.... I'm not too sure about what you're describing; as it sounds a bit counter-productive/-intuitive. First, what about "blipping?" You can't blip the throttle and hold the brake lever steady with this 'added' weight on your hands; true, more advanced than your example - just a thought. Also, there could be a possibility that your description could initiate or, at least, exacerbate SR #2 - Tightening on the bars -- do you really want the added distractions (bumps, undulations, etc.) of the road surface to take any of your attention? I'm also wondering about the "correct" pressure. If you don't have enough pressure to counter steer, you'd have to add a little after your suggestion... why not forgo the worrying of using 'braking pressure' to counter steer, and just counter steer with whatever amount of inside pressure that you need once you need it.

 

Plus, in my mind, there's a timing and 'too many things' issue; not to mention trail braking. Your approach sounds to have one thing rely upon another. I equate Keith's methodology to "baby steps." Perform one task, move to the next task, then to the next, and so on. One put together, it may appear as everything is simultaneous, but that's just because of the fluidity and cohesion of all the individual steps.

 

I applaud your inquisitiveness. The mere fact that you're thinking so intensely suggests, to me anyway, that you're on the right track. As Oz mentioned, try to get to Level 1, you'll be amazed how these questions can be picked apart [examined in detail] and compared to the techniques taught at the CSS course -- I sure was.

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+1 for getign to level 1. Isolting the forces I was putting onto the bike was a revelation - once I stopped trying to tell it what to do all the time I found it really didn't need telling after all. Part of this is leaning on the bars for the right reason - steering - not for the wrong ones.

 

A good discussion here on body position and braking:

http://forums.superbikeschool.com/index.php?showtopic=2234

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