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Hi Doc,

 

Many different opinions on this. Recently I tried the Dr. Al Sears techniques, of short exercise, followed by rest. He has a whole method for using the heart to monitor one's condition.

 

I gathered from what he wrote, long, light cardio is not good (he cites some marthoners dropping dead at 27) for many reasons. This is way more to this (http://www.alsearsmd.com/catalog/).

 

But I'd like to get your take on increasing endurance and stamina.

 

Best,

CF

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Running short distances with loads, like a backpack or weight wrapped around your legs.That will make normal business a cakewalk.It is how the shaolin monks train.

 

They consider a good runner someone who can run 50 km with 50 kgs in lead shot strapped to each leg, continuously, and not " Draw excessive breath " or breathe heavily at the end of it.LOL....

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I've been doing "PACE" from Al Sears for about 1 + 1/2 years now, you get in real good shape, put on 3 kilos though which is probably muscle (at least I hope that's what it is ;-) ). It's definitely better than cardio (at least for me), I find it a lot easier now to move around on the bike and giving steering impulses.

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A principle I learned long ago, and reinforced by the recent explosion in CrossFit'ting, is you have to train with high intensity. "Light" or "recovery" training is mostly useless to your body, unless maybe you have specific problem which can't be overcome by changing exercises (i.e. recovery from a medical problem). The key is to train unpredictably and with generous variety. 5k run today, calisthenics session tomorrow, then a heavy weights session, then 400's, and so on (all done "hard", no easy days). The idea is not new but is effective.

 

I haven't read Dr. Sears but have added it to the to-do list.

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im doing the bodbot routine , it uses algorithms to calculate and change your workout intensities which is great (but a bit buggy as of now)

 

had sore but movable/usable arms/legs for 3 days in a row , recovered within 2 days (which is rare for me , esp if i overtrain unexpectedly)

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I'm a slacker compared to you boys.

 

50kg to each leg for 50km!!! That guy is a fricking animal!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I"m gonna pester the doc on this section too, like to see how he will answer my original question.

CF

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I'm not good at motivating myself at the gym, so I've found that there are a couple of great classes at my gym: 1st a strength and conditioning class, 2nd is a core/abs class. Both classes I'm typically the only guy in them, but I don't care there are some cuties my wife included

 

For the conditioning class, I have to double up weight bars/dumbbells typically because they only have weights up to 20lbs, but its high reps with medium weight, and typically goes squats/lunges/ Into upper body/back to squats lunges the. Ends with core work.

 

The core class is the Les Mills cxworx and it changes every 4-5 weeks or so.

 

With the conditioning class my typical heart rate is up around 155, and I'm 40, I'm not worried about adding bulk, just conditioning and strengthening what I have. So I do 2 set/cond classes, 3 core and another 3 hours broke up on the stationary bike.

 

Been on this routine for about 2 months and am starting to feel the results!

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I hate typing on my cell phone. - sorry about the spelling issues in the previous post. Couldn't see where to go back in and edit it.

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A short note on this: I went skiing this last weekend, Taos, NM (my dad still lives there, I learned to ski there as a kid).

 

So as a 53 year old, that doesn't really exercise much, going to 9-12,000 feet from sea level--pretty much kicked my ass.

 

But...I did as well as my brother and son, both lots younger. I have to attribute not completely dying to the PACE program which I worked on very minorliy for a week or 2 before.

 

My 2 cents!

 

CF

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Sorry for the delay :D

 

Monitoring heart rate to determine workout intensity is one of the best ways I know to determine when you have reached your limit of healthy endurance training. Muscle confusion (changing exercises often) prevents the body from adapting and becoming too economical. However, when it comes to riding or any other sport, you want those muscles to have high endurance without fatigue. So maintaining the main muscles of riding on a regular basis is advised.

 

Studies have shown that working out/exercising every day will cause a sports injury within the first year. At least one day per week of rest allows safer exercise and better progress.

 

Oh and one more thing :) ...muscles are connective tissue like the skin. It takes approximately 6 or 7 days to fully recover from a strenuous workout. The same amount of time it takes your skin to recover from a scratch. I found for best results to work one muscle group very hard once a week allowing it to fully heal before you work it again.

 

Best,

Dr. Price

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Oh and one more thing :) ...muscles are connective tissue like the skin. It takes approximately 6 or 7 days to fully recover from a strenuous workout. The same amount of time it takes your skin to recover from a scratch. I found for best results to work one muscle group very hard once a week allowing it to fully heal before you work it again.

 

Best,

Dr. Price

 

I have had excellent results over the past months doing that. To go along with rest days, there is getting a good nights rest. I would say getting 6-8 hours sleep to complement your workout is just as important as the workout itself. At least that is the way it works for me.

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  • 3 months later...

Crash.net:

As the time goes on do you feel you have to train any harder?

 

Colin Edwards:

I don't have any regimented gym time where I've got to go this day or that day. Recently my wife was training for the triathlon so I trained with her, I just stay fit.

 

My daily routine is more taking the kids out in the boat or playing baseball in the yard.

 

Now that everybody's running on Bridgestones rather than the Michelins, the bike's got a lot heavier and we had to figure out how to make the bike light turning again because they're getting pretty strenuous.

 

I think too much of an obsession with training is more a brain thing. Some guys have this brain thing where if they haven't trained for a week or missed a certain day, they turn up at the race track thinking 'I missed that days training, I'm not as fit as I could be' and they've already set themselves up for failure.

 

I had a team-mate like that one time and he used to be his own worst enemy. I just choose not to worry about that. It's more important to be mentally fit.

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